Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

The Terrine Topic


MatthewB
 Share

Recommended Posts

  • 3 months later...

gallery_16307_215_7107.jpg

This past week I've been making a "the devil made me do it" terrine full of wild ingredients. Guinea fowl, pork throat, chestnuts, and a secret chocolate ingredient which I am loathe to disclose lest you all kick me out of eG. The recipe is long but not complicated, and you can find it here.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This past week I've been making a "the devil made me do it" terrine full of wild ingredients.  Guinea fowl, pork throat, chestnuts, and a secret chocolate ingredient which I am loathe to disclose lest you all kick me out of eG.  The recipe is long but not complicated, and you can find it here.

Abra, this seems like a perfect excuse to do some baking. I have a question about one of the other ingredients though. I may be wrong, because I certainly have never looked for it before, but I have a hard time imagining that I will find pork throat at my grocery store here in southern California. And I have no idea what type of meat it is. Can you recommend a substitute?
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Oh dear, Nibor, I really don't know. The throat is just that, not the inside where you swallow, but the outer portion that hangs under the jaw of the pig. It's very fat, maybe as much as 85% fat, supposedly very flavorful, and from what I've read it's a principal ingredient in most French patés and sausages. It adds fat to the mixture that doesn't melt out in the cooking, thereby producing a creamy texture. Now that I have access to it I realize why terrines and patés I made in the US never had the "right" texture or mouthfeel.

That said, American pigs all have throats, and that meat must be available somewhere. I'd start by asking a good butcher, and if you have no luck there, maybe make the rounds of some ethnic markets.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Oh dear, Nibor, I really don't know.  The throat is just that, not the inside where you swallow, but the outer portion that hangs under the jaw of the pig.  It's very fat, maybe as much as 85% fat, supposedly very flavorful, and from what I've read it's a principal ingredient in most French patés and sausages.  It adds fat to the mixture that doesn't melt out in the cooking, thereby producing a creamy texture.  Now that I have access to it I realize why terrines and patés I made in the US never had the "right" texture or mouthfeel.

That said, American pigs all have throats, and that meat must be available somewhere.  I'd start by asking a good butcher, and if you have no luck there, maybe make the rounds of some ethnic markets.

Fat! Yum. OK, I will start looking. I used to make 2 duck terrines every other week, on the day before my cleaning lady came (what a mess). I froze slices and then could have one, sauteed in a little butter, for breakfast or a snack. I am feeling inspired, so maybe I will start up by terrine routine again.

In the meantime I am watching my red wine + mother, hoping to get vinegar. You were right, of course - it does not smell bad.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

I want to make a terrine for the 1st time and would like to follow this recipe:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/food/recipes/database...ith_85947.shtml

He uses 2 pig's trotters (I presume instead of gelatine). On this occassion I do not want to use pigs trotters. Can anyone familiar with gelatine leaves tell me how many I'd need instead of the trotters? The recipe is for a 1.5 litre terrine mould.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 9 months later...
Nicely done. Did the aspic layer just ooze out, or did you pour that in through the portholes?
The aspic was poured in through the chimneys once the pâté had cooled. Poultry pâté got the poultry aspic treatment whereas the predominant pork versions got the porcine equivalent; in both cases the respective consommé was colored with red wine and thickened with gelatin. Initial prototypes were met with modest almost disastrous results until proper dough, forcemeat and aspic recipes/proportions were determined. Anything worth screwing up twice is worth screwing up thrice and it remains a crucial exercise in learning cookery limits (heat, fat, salt, water, time, method)

Pâté pantin Richelieu. Beta version.

Pâté fail. Pastry fell apart, aspic too loose, forcemeat dry.

3787016255_4487d82bac_m.jpg

3787842294_4c8e203c5a.jpg

Pâté pantin 2.0. Special poultry edition.

Better. With poached chicken, gizzards, liver, carrot and celery.

3807008286_deac56a53c.jpg

3807019470_696575d0ce.jpg

Turkey Pâté pantin 4.0. Special Thanksgiving edition.

Well executed save for hasty pouring of the aspic. Turkey, pork, duck, poultry livers, gizzards, pistachios, currants and fatback.

4269729259_403c70e679.jpg

4141383417_7cdb945bab.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Most inspiring, Baron, and this...

Anything worth screwing up twice is worth screwing up thrice and it remains a crucial exercise in learning cookery limits (heat, fat, salt, water, time, method)

...couldn't be more true. I have to get back at it and conquer the terrine. My version 2 is on the menu for this weekend.

"I took the habit of asking Pierre to bring me whatever looks good today and he would bring out the most wonderful things," - bleudauvergne

foodblogs: Dining Downeast I - Dining Downeast II

Portland Food Map.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 months later...
For those with experience using nitrite in pâtés, what percent of the meat portion is required to maintain a nice pink hue?

.25% nitrite of meat weight.

Easter Pâté Pantin, special Greek Orthodox edition.

Game hen, duck, pork, chicken livers, lardo and pistachios. Should be rewarded with orchestra seats to the rapture.

4495293297_f688056d8b.jpg

4495269975_1ff845b2a3.jpg

4495252167_f1af1ceccb.jpg

4495243953_b06e6d8a03.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 months later...

Softcore. Show us the inside!

This is my skillet. There are many like it, but this one is mine. My skillet is my best friend. It is my life. I must master it, as I must master my life. Without me my skillet is useless. Without my skillet, I am useless. I must season my skillet well. I will. Before God I swear this creed. My skillet and myself are the makers of my meal. We are the masters of our kitchen. So be it, until there are no ingredients, but dinner. Amen.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 months later...
  • 1 month later...

A master craftsman. I am impressed with every one of those posts, Baron d'Apcher. Your blog is now on my list of worthy reads.

Edited by ChrisTaylor (log)

Chris Taylor

Host, eG Forums - ctaylor@egstaff.org

 

I've never met an animal I didn't enjoy with salt and pepper.

Melbourne
Harare, Victoria Falls and some places in between

Link to comment
Share on other sites

That said, American pigs all have throats, and that meat must be available somewhere. I'd start by asking a good butcher, and if you have no luck there, maybe make the rounds of some ethnic markets.

Coming in late here, but if this is what I think it is, it goes by the name "hang cheong sal" in Korean barbecue. And a very succulent meat it is, too.

Baron, as ever, your pastry skills shame me. What inspires you to make the elaborate patterns? Do you use a boiled water crust?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...