Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Recommended Posts

1 hour ago, jimb0 said:

i had that thought too but while it would be delicious it surely would have a much different texture no?

 

Potentially - you'd have to play around with it. In a bonbon, I'm not sure how much texture (apart from generic crunch) would actually come through...

Link to post
Share on other sites

@jmacnaughtan, others on eG have mentioned making a pipeable layer with crushed gingersnaps or graham crackers, and I have experimented with that concept.  You are certainly correct that it takes some "playing around" to get the right mix of the crushed item and whatever holds it together.  Cocoa butter and the crushed cookie tasted horrible; chocolate tended to cause the layer to lose its crunch.  Most recently I tried @Rajala's idea for a gingersnap bonbon.  It calls for partially crushing gingersnaps and adding chocolate, ghee, and coconut oil, but my attempt lost the crunch (I finally made gingersnaps instead, and the resulting filling was delicious).  After my experiments, I concluded that a "praliné layer" (as it is called by some) does not come close enough for me to the crunch of a cookie.  It is an idea certainly worth more experimentation because it is so much easier to pipe in a layer rather than add a cookie plus a "moisture barrier."

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
44 minutes ago, Jim D. said:

@jmacnaughtan, others on eG have mentioned making a pipeable layer with crushed gingersnaps or graham crackers, and I have experimented with that concept.  You are certainly correct that it takes some "playing around" to get the right mix of the crushed item and whatever holds it together.  Cocoa butter and the crushed cookie tasted horrible; chocolate tended to cause the layer to lose its crunch.  Most recently I tried @Rajala's idea for a gingersnap bonbon.  It calls for partially crushing gingersnaps and adding chocolate, ghee, and coconut oil, but my attempt lost the crunch (I finally made gingersnaps instead, and the resulting filling was delicious).  After my experiments, I concluded that a "praliné layer" (as it is called by some) does not come close enough for me to the crunch of a cookie.  It is an idea certainly worth more experimentation because it is so much easier to pipe in a layer rather than add a cookie plus a "moisture barrier."

 

ah i remember us discussing this at another juncture.

 

perhaps it's worth looking at the concept ab initio. instead of taking what amounts to a pre-made cookie (even if you're the one pre-making it) and modifying, deconstructing, or otherwise processing it to fit the need at hand, what about creating a product that gives the impression of a cookie and can be directly used in something like a bonbon? i use milk crumbs a lot, and while i've never put one in a bonbon, i think it might work. it's basically just mixing together flour, sugar, milk powder, and melted butter, and some salt. then you bake it until golden brown, add melted white chocolate, and some more milk powder, and stir every ten minutes or so until you end up with a bowl of coated, pea-sized cookie crumbs. i think they taste pretty great, to be honest, and they'd already be protected against water. they don't stick to each other and last forever in a bag in the fridge.

 

callebaut also makes crispearls, which i think could serve a similar purpose, but the diy crumbs will taste better.

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Jim D. said:

@jmacnaughtan, others on eG have mentioned making a pipeable layer with crushed gingersnaps or graham crackers, and I have experimented with that concept.  You are certainly correct that it takes some "playing around" to get the right mix of the crushed item and whatever holds it together.  Cocoa butter and the crushed cookie tasted horrible; chocolate tended to cause the layer to lose its crunch.  Most recently I tried @Rajala's idea for a gingersnap bonbon.  It calls for partially crushing gingersnaps and adding chocolate, ghee, and coconut oil, but my attempt lost the crunch (I finally made gingersnaps instead, and the resulting filling was delicious).  After my experiments, I concluded that a "praliné layer" (as it is called by some) does not come close enough for me to the crunch of a cookie.  It is an idea certainly worth more experimentation because it is so much easier to pipe in a layer rather than add a cookie plus a "moisture barrier."

 

Yeah, the thing I did isn't like a complete crunchy element, but more a little crunchy texture.

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/1/2021 at 6:44 PM, Jim D. said:

@kriirk, earlier in this thread, in your discussion of the NYT shortbread recipe, you stated that one should not make rounds from it:  "Please also note that low flour content means non-suitable for making 'rounds.'"

 

Can you explain why this is true?  I ask because I often make round cookies from shortbread and have had some difficulty with them and am always looking for a solution.

 

 

Sure. Only the flour provides structure/shape in this recipe. Without enough flour, the dough becomes liquid at some point as heat rises, and the 'round' will flatten and look more like a small pool.

 

Edit - looking at your photo, it looks more like the cause was air bubbles inside the dough.

Edited by kriirk (log)
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, kriirk said:

 looking at your photo, it looks more like the cause was air bubbles inside the dough.

 

Perhaps I should not use an electric mixer to cream the butter and sugar to start--although doing it by hand does not sound like an easy task (yes, I do know electric mixers have not always existed!).  But why would the "crater" effect not happen with larger pieces made from the same dough?

Link to post
Share on other sites

soft doughs in "pans" always rise fast/quicker/more around the edges.

makes common sense - that's where the heat is.....

is is also not at all uncommon for doughs to "rise up then sink" as they finish cooking / and or cool.

except that around the edges, doughs may stick to the walls.  an issue noted in souffles, for example - butter/sugar the wall of the pan/pot so the souffle can more easily "climb" . . .

 

multiple xxxxx-berry buckles and xxxx-fruit cobblers exhibit that behavior.  if I don't turn back the oven temp when the edges are set  to a

'pretty& browned' stage - the middle eventually gets done but the edges wind up burnt/dry/crispy/un-nice.....

 

the mini-craters on the bottom is likely due to water content in butter in / near directly in contact with the baking surface aka pan/sheet/stone....

the water "explodes" when turning to steam and makes a hole....

Link to post
Share on other sites

soften the butter, don't cream for as long or at a high speed, and try using a perforated sheet pan lined with parchment to bake the cookies.  I don't know that this would work but when baking puff pastry and you want it to stay flat,  you bake it between sheet pans (have parchment under and on top of your dough when baking) so it's worth a try.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Similar Content

    • By MightyD
      cakes, cookies, pies, that makes you smile!!!!
    • By meryll_thirteen
      Hi guys! I got excited to post something as this is my first one.
      So, the top 3 desserts I like to eat when I was still in Philippines were Halu-halo (literally means mix-mix in english), brazo de mercedes and chocolate crinkles.

      1. HALU-HALO is one of the popular food during summer. This is basically:
      shaved ice with evaporated milk,
      sugar,
      and the following:
      - nata de coco (coconut cream based on a google search, these are cube-like jellies),
      - sweetened red beans,
      - sweetened bananas,
      - cooked sago or tapioca,
      - ube or purple yam,
      - leche flan (this is also one of the best desserts to eat),
      - macapuno (made of coconut),
      - sweetend jackfruit,
      - sweetened kamote (this is similar to sweet potato but caramelized),
      - sweetened kaong (sugar palm fruit)
      - and topped with a scoop of ice cream.
      These fruits are usually bought in jars (found mostly in Asian grocery stores). You basically put the fruits at the bottom, add sugar (if you want because almost all the fruits are sweetened so it's already sweet), then you fill the cup/bowl with shaved ice and add milk. And most importantly, mix it well before you eat because you don't want to eat shaved ice with milk only and then eat the really sweet fruits last.

      2. BRAZO DE MERCEDES
      Yah, I think the name is Spanish? I tried making this but I just failed. It's kinda hard to do and takes a lot of patience but it's really worth it. This is my favourite cake! In Philippines, most bakeries sell this but my favourite is from Goldiluck's which is located in shopping malls.
      Brazo de Mercedes recipe

      3. CHOCOLATE CRINKLES
      These are my favourite chocolate cookies! I think this one isn't really from Philippines but they are really popular. I was kinda shocked when I came here in Canada, because they don't sell these cookies in the bakeries I've been to so I tried baking these on my own. Since my post is getting long, I'll put the recipe as a link at the bottom.
      http://sweb2.dmit.na...rinkles-recipe/
      I hope you enjoyed my post! Happy eating and baking everyone!
    • By ChrisZ
      Hoping for some help.  I accidentally melted an old mould that is very important to us and I've had no luck searching around for a replacement.  
      If anyone knows where I could buy one - or even has one to spare they would be willing to sell - please send me a message.
      The mould (label attached below) was originally labelled as "Easy as ABC gelatin mould", although we just call it the alphabet mould.  Yes there are lots of alphabet moulds around, including new silicone ones, but we need the specific designs on this one to replace the one I damaged.  Depending on the cost, I would consider paying for postage internationally (to Australia).
      Thanks in advance!

    • By Kasia
      MILLET GROATS CHOCOLATE CREME WITH CRANBERRY MOUSSE
       
      Today I would like to share with you the recipe for the best chocolate crème I have ever eaten. It is thick, smooth and very chocolaty in flavour and colour. Despite the chocolate, the dessert isn't too sweet. But if somebody thinks that it is, I recommend serving it with slightly sour fruit mousse. You can use cherries, currants or cranberries. You will make an unusually yummy arrangement and your dessert will look beautiful.

      My children were delighted with this dessert. I told them about the fact it had been made with millet groats after they had eaten it, and ... they didn't believe me. Next time I will prepare the millet groats crème with a double portion of ingredients.

      Ingredients (for 4 people)
      chocolate crème
      100g of millet groats
      200g of dark chocolate
      1 tablespoon of dark cocoa
      250ml of almond milk
      fruit mousse
      250g of fresh cranberries
      juice and peel of one orange
      half a teaspoon of grated ginger
      4 tablespoons of brown sugar

      Boil the millet groats in salty water and drain them. Melt the chocolate in a bain-marie. Blend the millet groats, chocolate, cocoa and milk very thoroughly until you have very smooth crème. Pour the milk in gradually to make the right consistency of your desert. Prepare the fruit mousse. Put the washed cranberries, ginger, juice orange peel and sugar into a pot. Boil until the fruits are soft. Blend. Put the chocolate crème into some small bowls. Put the fruit mousse on top. Decorate with peppermint leaves. Serve at once or chilled.

      Enjoy your meal!


    • By Kasia
      BICOLOUR DESERT WITH SEMOLINA
       
      Today when we think about breakfast with milk we can choose different kinds of flakes, granolas, muesli and milk which has sometimes never been anywhere near a cow. When I was a child, only semolina rolled oats and rice were on the menu. Semolina with milk – our hated everyday breakfast – means that I don't fancy using it in my kitchen. But, as they say, time is a great healer and semolina was on our table last weekend for dessert. The dessert had two colours: the first layer was vanilla, and the second was with cocoa. On the top I put some mousse with blueberries. The dessert was very grand and really very tasty.

      Ingredients (for 4 people)
      vanilla layer
      50g of semolina
      400ml of milk
      3 tablespoons of brown sugar
      1 teaspoon of vanilla essence
      cocoa layer
      50g of semolina
      400ml of milk
      3 tablespoons of brown sugar
      2 tablespoons of cocoa
      fruit mousse
      200g of blueberries
      1 tablespoon of brown sugar
      pinch of cinnamon
      1 tablespoon of lemon juice

      First prepare the vanilla layer of the dessert. Boil the milk with sugar and vanilla essence. When the milk has boiled, slowly add the semolina, stirring constantly so as not to make lumps. Keep boiling and stirring until the mixture is stiff. Put some small glasses into some small bowls and arrange them in such a way that they are resting at an angle. Put the mixture into the glasses and leave to congeal. Now make the cocoa layer. Boil the milk with sugar. Mix the semolina with the cocoa. When the milk has boiled, slowly add the semolina with cocoa, stirring constantly so as not to make lumps. Keep boiling and stirring until the mixture is stiff. Place the glasses upright and put the cocoa mixture into them. Leave to congeal. Wash the blueberries and blend them with the sugar, cinnamon and lemon juice. Put the fruit mousse on top of the dessert.

      Enjoy your meal!

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...