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kriirk

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Everything posted by kriirk

  1. Hello, I wanted to try for something easier to eyeball and cut, compared to traditional cuts seen here: https://www.google.com/search?q=cake+cutting+guide&tbm=isch You can be the judge whether success or not 😅🙇
  2. kriirk

    Shortbread

    Jim, maybe try soften butter microwave or bowl in hot water for easier mixing with large spoon.
  3. kriirk

    Shortbread

    Sure. Only the flour provides structure/shape in this recipe. Without enough flour, the dough becomes liquid at some point as heat rises, and the 'round' will flatten and look more like a small pool. Edit - looking at your photo, it looks more like the cause was air bubbles inside the dough.
  4. kriirk

    Shortbread

    Briefly on the history of the shortbread recipe British sugar import started ca. 1650. First published recipe for "short bread", based on web archives, is from the book Cookery and Pastry By Susanna MacIver, Edinburgh 1773: To make Short-Bread. Take a peck (=9.1 litres) of flour, and four pounds of butter English, or three pounds Scots, weight; put the butter on to come a-boil; make a hole in the flour, and pour the boiling butter in it; work the flour and butter a little while together; pour in a mutchkin of good yest amongst the paste; work it together, but not too much; divide the paste and roll it out oval; then cut it through the middle, and plait it at the ends; keep out a little of the flour to work out the bread; flour gray paper, and fire the bread on it: if you make it sweet, allow a pound (Scots or English?) of sugar to the peck of flour at least; if you want it very rich, put in citron, orange-peel, and almonds, and strew white carvy on the top; be sure to mix the sugar and fruit with the flour before you wet it; remember to prick it well on the top. The recipes we see today tend to follow a sugar-butter-flour weight ratio of 1:2:4. It seems that this was established around 1850. Here from the book Cookery and domestic economy By Mrs. Mary Somerville, 1862 Glasgow: Plain Shortbread (referred to as 'Scottish' in other books) 4oz castor sugar 8oz butter 16oz flour Rice Shortbread 4oz castor sugar 8oz butter 8oz flour 8oz rice flour Almond Shortbread 4oz castor sugar 8oz butter 12oz flour 1oz almonds (ground+flour) I tried to find an early recipe that uses less flour. Here is the only one I was able to find, using a 2:3:4 weight ratio, from the magazine The Girl's Own Paper, Vol. XX, No. 995, January 21, 1899: Shortbread. Ingredients.—One pound of flour, three-quarters of a pound of butter, half a pound of castor sugar. Method.—Rub six ounces of the butter into the flour and sugar, melt the rest and mix it in; work a little with the hands to form a dough; roll into two thick rounds and pinch them round the edge with the fingers to ornament them. Prick over the top with a fork or a biscuit pricker; put two or three large pieces of candied peel on each and bake about half an hour in a moderate oven. (Interestingly, this method seems copied from Mrs. Somerville's 1862 Almond Shortbread recipe.)
  5. kriirk

    Shortbread

    Hello 😄, I tested some tweaks for the 'fudgy' NYT recipe (see previous page) this year. -even less flour (success) -pre-toasted flour (big failure) -more salt (success) -lower temperature (success) As a result, my recipe has now changed to: 1.8dl caster/superfine sugar 250g salted(1.1%) butter 4dl flour 1/2 tsp salt Bake @ 110°C ~90 min. The extra salt did great things for the flavor. Next time, I will experiment with even more salt. (IIRC, our Norwegian salted butter used to have 1.6% salt not long ago, so I was surprised it only has 1.1% now..)
  6. kriirk

    Shortbread

    Friends, this intrigues me.. Stephanie Jaworski (joyofbaking.com) has a radical tip, using frozen grated butter. She insists it noticeably enhances texture. Unsure where this tip originates. Her bio says "Born in Nova Scotia to a British father I was brought up eating both Canadian and British food." This is contrary to how I was taught to always mix sugar and butter thoroughly until fluffy, before adding flour. I guess I will have to try and see what happens. Wish me luck. Her recipe/method: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tejo7q5Z9Vw Edit 1 - Hmm.. I guess the frozen butter means it's water content is ice crystals, so not mixing with the flour. So the flour will be dry-toasted a bit more in the beginning. Aha! Google gave me this: "Baking expert Dorie Greenspan uses roasted flour (toasted in an oven) for her shortbreads." from https://www.bonappetit.com/test-kitchen/inside-our-kitchen/article/how-and-why-to-toast-flour Very interesting ideas. So one might take this even a step further.. Edit 2 - I believe I will try pre-toasting the flour instead. Edit 3 - pre-toasting the flour was disastrous. Tasted like sand in the worst thinkable way.
  7. kriirk

    Shortbread

    Hello friends. As I can not take my daughter to visit with grandparents this x-mas, I need to step up my baking efforts! Oh, and my obsession with shortbread has not waned. For example, since tasting a cake that had Parmesan in it a while back, I have been wanting to try Parmesan on shortbread! Maybe I can make a handful 'creative' variants and test them on unsuspecting guests ^-^ (I am certain I will return to making original shortbread afterwards though.) In case I shall require further inspiration, I have gathered a small list of places (list below) that seem to have numerous shortbread recipes. I very much enjoy browsing recipes on the internet - especially if there are pictures. 28 https://foodnetwork.co.uk/search/?q=shortbread&search=shortbread 28 https://cooking.nytimes.com/search?q=shortbread 30 https://www.bettycrocker.com/search?term=shortbread 36 https://www.bbc.co.uk/food/search?q=shortbread 60 https://www.foodandwine.com/search?q=shortbread 69 https://www.bbcgoodfood.com/search/recipes?q=shortbread 90 https://www.bhg.com/search/?q=shortbread 90 https://www.foodista.com/search/node/shortbread? 90 https://www.tasteofhome.com/search/index?search=shortbread 120 https://www.allrecipes.com/search/results/?wt=shortbread 120 https://www.taste.com.au/search-recipes/?page=1&q=shortbread 130 https://food52.com/recipes/search?q=shortbread 150 https://www.foodnetwork.ca/search/?q=shortbread 150 https://recipeland.com/recipes/list?q=shortbread? 170 https://www.marthastewart.com/search/results?keys=shortbread 190 https://www.epicurious.com/search/shortbread 210 https://www.myrecipes.com/search?q=shortbread 260 https://cookeatshare.com/recipes?keywords=shortbread 640 https://www.cooks.com/rec/search?q=shortbread 800 https://www.yummly.com/recipes?q=shortbread 850 https://www.food.com/search/shortbread
  8. kriirk

    Shortbread

    'Fudgy' shortbread pictures! (sorry a bit late)
  9. kriirk

    Shortbread

    Thank you, Kerry! I feel my best result so far was using double portion size in a square 23cm (9inch?) dish. I must warn they were almost an inch thick, but having a bit more to chew into was so nice with the soft texture. Hmm I must also add a note that I prefer these served cold from the fridge. Makes the taste less buttery and more wholesome. I will try again to find the original post from a year ago and link that as well. Update - for some reason I found the original article easily today, unlike some days ago. It is now linked in the recipe. I also added some info about pan size in there. I might make them this weekend and add pictures.
  10. kriirk

    Shortbread

    My first post! I would like to contribute to this already amazing topic. NYT's Melissa Clark's 'Fudgy' Shortbread From Original Article: 150g sugar 225g unsalted butter 250g flour + 3/4tsp fine salt My own 'metric' version: 1.8dl (167g) caster/superfine sugar 250g (3dl) salted butter 5dl (278g) flour Below is how I make these, based on personal preference and a bit of research. Read linked article to see how Melissa makes them. With hand mixer, work sugar and room temperature butter until fluffy. Pour in all the flour, and 'fold' it in until just absorbed, then stop. I actually find a chop stick perfect for this. Spread in a small* pan. Bake in center of oven 30-60min @ 135°C / 280°F. Let cool just a little, and cut into 'fingers'. I like to make the fingers small, due to how satiating this version is. *: I bake a double size portion in this square 9" tin. Result is somewhat substantial thickness around ~1". -Please note that the dough will look like there is too much butter, especially while in the oven. But they will still turn out amazing. They are everyone's new favorite, since I started making them a year ago. -Please also note that low flour content means non-suitable for making 'rounds' - use for fingers and petticoat tails only. -Baking time will vary quite a bit with layer thickness. Then there is personal preference. I like them best when the color is just starting to change near the outer edge, so after 30 min I start checking every 5 min. -In my opinion, these are a rare case of pastry that does not taste optimally hot from the oven. I actually prefer them served cold from the fridge the next day, making the taste rounder, less buttery and less salty.
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