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Time Life "Foods of the World" series


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No, "Offal" is not "Variety Meats". And "Confectionery" is definitely not Candy. The mystery remains only until I can take some photos small enough to upload. :blink:

Not sure what will be different between "Offal" and "Variety Meats" except that lights were/are illegal for food in the US and the Variety Meats haggis recipe does not include them! At least the cover pictures seem to be the same.

I found Wikipedia has an article on the US/UK titles:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Good_Cook

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The covers are not the same, and I believe Wikipedia seems to be mistaken in saying they are the same.

No, "Offal" is not "Variety Meats". And "Confectionery" is definitely not Candy. The mystery remains only until I can take some photos small enough to upload. :blink:

Not sure what will be different between "Offal" and "Variety Meats" except that lights were/are illegal for food in the US and the Variety Meats haggis recipe does not include them! At least the cover pictures seem to be the same.

I found Wikipedia has an article on the US/UK titles:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Good_Cook

Carpe Carp: Seize that fish!

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Wikipedia did not say the Offal/Variety Meats covers were the same, I said the covers were the same (after finding a picture of the Offal book on line). Well, they are not exactly the same -- one says Offal and one says Variety Meats.

The cover picture posted for Confectionery is the same cover picture as Candy. However the cover pictures for Biscuits and Patisserie do not match volumes in my collection. Whether the text is similar I do not know.

I'd love to know if the haggis recipe in Offal includes lights.

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never ate a lamp, so I had to google "lights", never heard that word used for lungs, LOL

Some day I'd love to find a whole set of these books, but I'm not going to walk into the "one at a time" trap (again), haha!

"And don't forget music - music in the kitchen is an essential ingredient!"

- Thomas Keller

Diablo Kitchen, my food blog

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In The Good Cook series: I seem to remember there's Fish in the US and Fish and Seafood in the UK, or possibly the reverse, but they're more or less the same book. I've had multiple copies of these.

Back to Foods Of The World: Has anyone ever tried to make that jar of layered herring and vegetables that's on the cover of the Scandinavia volume? It looks delicious!

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Wikipedia did not say the Offal/Variety Meats covers were the same, I said the covers were the same (after finding a picture of the Offal book on line). Well, they are not exactly the same -- one says Offal and one says Variety Meats.

The cover picture posted for Confectionery is the same cover picture as Candy. However the cover pictures for Biscuits and Patisserie do not match volumes in my collection. Whether the text is similar I do not know.

I'd love to know if the haggis recipe in Offal includes lights.

Yes, Offal includes1 Sheeps Pluck (heart, lungs, and liver) vs. Varietys heart and liver only. Otherwise, they are pretty similiar. If fact, both recipes are by F> Marian Mcneill from The Scots Kitchen.

Interesting: Right next to Haggis is Baked Lamb's Offal With Rice. It includes lamb's lungs, liver, kidneys and sweetbreads! Yum!

Carpe Carp: Seize that fish!

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BTW, all five extra books came from Europe, and were pretty difficult to find. With pricing in Euros and shipping, I recall paying almost as much as the entire US set usually sells for. I love them, though, :wub: for some strange reason. :biggrin:

Carpe Carp: Seize that fish!

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never ate a lamp, so I had to google "lights", never heard that word used for lungs, LOL

Some day I'd love to find a whole set of these books, but I'm not going to walk into the "one at a time" trap (again), haha!

There's a set on ebay, just checked yesterday, around $300
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so I never did get around to collecting the books back when I posted to this topic in 2005.

fast forward 8 years later, and I've started down that road, spurred on by a recent trip to the Strand and a PM exchange on Facebook with a friend.

006.JPG

so now I have the following: (1) China, (2) Japan, (3) Latin America, (4) Italy, (5) American Cooking: Creole and Acadian, (6) American Cooking: The Pacific Northwest, and (7) Russia (and the spiral bound book).

I rarely buy cookbooks. these cookbooks on the other hand, are automatic "must-haves" for me.

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I have some news...

There is yet 3 more Time Life series besides The Good Cook and Foods Of The World...There is also The Illustrated Library of Cooking, The Everyday Cookbooks & Great Meals In Minutes

http://www.volumelists.com/detail.php?ser=The%20Everyday%20Cookbooks

http://www.cookbkjj.com/college/time_life.htm

:::backing away slowly:::

Edited by GlorifiedRice (log)

Wawa Sizzli FTW!

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Should Great Dinners from Life (Time-Life Books, 1969) be added to this thread as well? The book by Eleanor Graves with the mouth-watering two-page spreads showing classic meals from each season?

I used to wonder over this book as a child... I was particularly fixated on the game dishes.

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so I never did get around to collecting the books back when I posted to this topic in 2005.

fast forward 8 years later, and I've started down that road, spurred on by a recent trip to the Strand and a PM exchange on Facebook with a friend.

attachicon.gif006.JPG

so now I have the following: (1) China, (2) Japan, (3) Latin America, (4) Italy, (5) American Cooking: Creole and Acadian, (6) American Cooking: The Pacific Northwest, and (7) Russia (and the spiral bound book).

I rarely buy cookbooks. these cookbooks on the other hand, are automatic "must-haves" for me.

The American cooking ones are simply wonderful. Although the Russian book entranced me when I was a young woman -- maybe I should crack that one open again!
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Okay can someone explain the discrepancy?

On the Wiki page for Foods of the World they list two different Middle Eastern cookbooks

Cooking of the Middle East

and

Middle-Eastern Cooking

They have separate ASIN numbers too

B001D10D3Y

B000ZLZVWQ

Is this just accounting for the fact that it is a 2 book set?

Edited by GlorifiedRice (log)

Wawa Sizzli FTW!

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Okay can someone explain the discrepancy?

On the Wiki page for Foods of the World they list two different Middle Eastern cookbooks

Cooking of the Middle East

and

Middle-Eastern Cooking

They have separate ASIN numbers too

B001D10D3Y

B000ZLZVWQ

Is this just accounting for the fact that it is a 2 book set?

ASIN numbers are Amazon's internal id numbers. I looked on Amazon for "time life cooking of the middle east" and came up with 4 different offerings with 3 different names (!) but they are all the same Time Life book. What happens when you sell on Amazon is that if you list the book slightly differently, Amazon will give it a separate listing and a separate ASIN. This can cause confusion for book buyers and sellers and is a constant complaint among careful booksellers who have to compete against folks who can't be bothered to be accurate when listing a book.

Here's the Amazon search: http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=time+life+cooking+of+the+middle+east

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I think I have all 27, mostly bought over a period of years as I found them used. I have given many (mostly Chinese) to grad students we've befriended.....they found them fascinating....."so old fashioned". I will use the Lion's Head meatball recipe for entertaining soon....we enjoyed them several times on our China trip.

One favorite is the one on the NorthEast US which shows scenes very much like where my parents grew up. The old lady peeling carrots could be my grandmother. I often showed that to international friends so they could see what life , and food, was like in those days.

Any interest in more cover photos?

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Managed to score about 6 volumes at the local used book store...mostly for $10/two volume set. Making the red cabbage from the German book. The house always smells so good with the cabbage, apple, red currant jelly and the red wine vinegar. I like to cook it down so it is fork tender which requires adding extra liquid during and extended cooking time. A great accompaniment to pork. Freezes very well also.

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