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2 minutes ago, rotuts said:

Wooly Bear Paws.

 

from real bears

 

\they were part of the sumptuous banquet

 

where ' very very ' fresh monkey brains were served.

 

Ive forgotten the list .  maybe 10 items ?

 

What banquet? What list?

...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

The Kitchen Scale Manifesto

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12 hours ago, liuzhou said:

Another for the Food Myths topic.

No doubt.  Though the scene takes place in a middle eastern restaurant so either way you're off the hook 🐵 🔨

That wasn't chicken

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I can understand eating bear and I don't think that there is any culture that hasn't done it, because when you think about it, that is a big hunk of meat that will serve a lot of people when you're hungry. Primates are in a whole different category. They look like us. Who hasn't gone to the zoo and seeing somebody that looks just like their brother-in-law or the nasty neighbor down the street looking back at them. And most of them are pretty slim pickings when it comes to getting meat.

My question is, @liuzhou, has there ever been a time when monkey meat has been a common item in the diet of the Chinese or has it been a desperation survival food?

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8 minutes ago, Tropicalsenior said:

My question is, @liuzhou, has there ever been a time when monkey meat has been a common item in the diet of the Chinese or has it been a desperation survival food?

 

So far as I am aware, it has never been common. Monkeys aren't that common apart from in the south.

The problem in China with these 'exotic' meats today has nothing to do with nutrition, survival or even taste. They are an exercise in conspicuous consumption. The supposed medical benefits aren't a priority.

"Look how rich I am!" $1000+ (USD) for a bear paw. Very, very few people have ever eaten it (or wanted to).

 

The practice is abhored by most Chinese and, as I've said, penalties are severe - including up to the death penalty.


 

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...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

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7 minutes ago, liuzhou said:

Look how rich I am!" $1000+ (USD) for a bear paw. Very, very few people have ever eaten it (or wanted to).

Thank you, that clears up a lot.

Personally, if I were to eat bear (I have been offered bear meat by friends who are hunters, I declined) the paw would be the last part that I would choose.

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6 minutes ago, Steve R. said:

Depends.  Sometimes I’m not in the mood for a large entree & would prefer finger food. 😇

You would be out of luck. Bears have toes therefore it would be tofued.

Edited by Tropicalsenior (log)
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6 hours ago, Tropicalsenior said:

tofued


Speaking of which - there is at least bear’s paw tofu (熊掌豆腐), combining the thrill of the name with the sustainability of a soy bean-derived heritage ...

Edited by Duvel (log)
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