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gulfporter

No Boil Lasagna Noodles

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I agree with those who soak no-boil noodles before building the lasagna. My current favorite lasagna is the spinach lasagna from Cook's Illustrated, usually the variation with mushrooms added. I put hot tap water in the lasagna pan and then add the noodles from the box, and given them time to soak while I make the white sauce. When they're ready, they come out and drain on kitchen towels until everything else is ready to go. The pan gets emptied and dried, and it's ready to go.

 

I may, at some point, try soaking "normal" dry lasagna noodles à la Adventures in Food, where the pasta gets soaked in room-temperature water for about ten minutes per minute of cooking time as advertised on the box. We've done other pasta this way, and it works.

 

Not trying to start any wars.

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MelissaH

Oswego, NY

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I did not soak the no-boil noodles and they came out perfectly in the recipe.  I will post the recipe under "recipes."

 

I agree with those who soak no-boil noodles before building the lasagna. My current favorite lasagna is the spinach lasagna from Cook's Illustrated, usually the variation with mushrooms added. I put hot tap water in the lasagna pan and then add the noodles from the box, and given them time to soak while I make the white sauce. When they're ready, they come out and drain on kitchen towels until everything else is ready to go. The pan gets emptied and dried, and it's ready to go.

 

I may, at some point, try soaking "normal" dry lasagna noodles à la Adventures in Food, where the pasta gets soaked in room-temperature water for about ten minutes per minute of cooking time as advertised on the box. We've done other pasta this way, and it works.

 

Not trying to start any wars.

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I used to make lasagne with regular noodles, without boiling. Turned out fine, to the extent that I couldn't tell the difference. Just a bit moister sauce. Then I started making my own noodles...that was it for either kind of store bought. In a pinch (moving, no kitchen stuff yet) I made it again last summer with the regular. It still came out fine. Then we ate it on the air mattress!

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I grew up eating American-style lasagna. Seems to me that my grandmother and mother never bothered to soak or par-boil the dry noodles. I continued the practice.

 

Primarily, in the "casserole-style" what bothers me is when the sheets of dry noodle expand they tend to bunch up at each end of the pan creating unsightly folded noodle strata.

 

SInce I've had real lasagna in Italy and throughout Europe my preference is for the cheesy and saucy baked to order single serving bubbling in a screaming hot dish. Wonton or eggroll wrappers work great for this approach as previously mentioned by Kim Shook.

 

Barrilla is mostly what's available here. Sometimes Ronzoni. The Central Market&HEB organics brand is pretty good. 

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Trader Joe's also has their own brand of no-boil lasagna noodles.


 

“Peter: Oh my god, Brian, there's a message in my Alphabits. It says, 'Oooooo.'

Brian: Peter, those are Cheerios.”

– From Fox TV’s “Family Guy”

 

Tim Oliver

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