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JoNorvelleWalker

Methode Rotuts

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So  So  Soooooooooooo

 

should there be one  ( pre-MR  :biggrin: )  try the ChileChard

 

a bit of more white Whine falvor

 

just saying ...............

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An exciting experiment tonight!  Rather than three CO2 cylinders as recommended by MC, I made my M.R. with just two cylinders.

 

The M.R. was fully charged to my taste.  Maybe if one was making soda three cylinders would help.  But why have soda if one can have M.R.?

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Tonight, as a further experiment,  I made my M.R. from just one cylinder.  It came out perfectly satisfactory.  The bubbles were more like Champagne.  Less hazard of asphyxiation during dinner.  Plus one CO2 cylinder is approximately one third the cost of three CO2 cylinders.

 

Still, three cylinder M.R. is something to be experienced.

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Ive always used one.  However Im on the cheap frugal side most of the time

 

esp. if you wait for the one cylinder to 'mix it up' in the container.

 

mine is 0.75 L.

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To go with an outstanding pork chop I splurged again on Ryan Patrick Washington state "naked chardonnay" 2012, no oak.  Running on all cylinders.

 

While Ryan Patrick reminds me slightly more of the leading bubbly, I am still perfectly delighted to inhale my mrified soave.

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http://winefolly.com/tutorial/40-wine-descriptions/

 

""  

BUTTERY A wine with buttery characteristics has been aged in oak and generally is rich and flat (less Acidity). A buttery wine often has a cream-like texture that hits the middle of your tongue almost like oil (or butter) and has a smooth finish.  ""

 

http://www.logabottle.com/home/wineguide.php?n=Buttery&t=1&id=75&gc=2

 

 

"""  Buttery

 

tweet_this_blue.png   facebook_share_taller.png

Wine Tasting Term

A buttery wine either tastes of butter in the mouth or leaves a buttery aftertaste once the wine is swallowed. It has a rich, creamy texture and a smooth finish, much like liquid butter. 

The flavor of butter in a wine is the result of an oak (not steel) barrel fermentation process and extended contact time with yeasts. However, due to the tannins and other overpowering characteristics of oak-barreled red wines, a butter flavor is nearly exclusive to white wines. 

A buttery taste is most common in oak-barreled Chardonnays and white Burgundy wines."""

 

 

 

to me though Oak-ey is not the same a buttery, ie some 'buttery' wines dont taste at all Oak-ey to me

 

and most Oak-ey wines dont taste buttery.

 

just saying.

I missed this when it was first posted.

 

The creamy flavour/texture in chardonnay is created by Malo-Lactic fermentation. This changes malic acid (think green apple acid) to lactic acid (milk) which is rounder, less sharp and, well, creamy/milky tasting.

 

The butter flavour in Chardonnay comes from an aroma compound called diacetyl which has an intensely buttery flavour and comes from oak maturation. It is used as a flavouring in butter popcorn, butterscotch, etc as well as occurring in beer and, of course, oaked wine.

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Nick Reynolds, aka "nickrey"

"The Internet is full of false information." Plato
My eG Foodblog

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As I read it, the talk above was about Chardonnay.

 

I'm not sure what you mean by the leading bubbly. Up until the middle of last century all Champagne houses used oak barrels in the traditional method of using champagne. But these were typically very large barrels reused many times, which means very little oak character in the resultant wine. The base wine used to make Champagne can come from many sources and some houses when making their premium Champagnes use a proportion of wine that has been fermented in oak. This is normally used to give a toasty element to the wine.

 

Wine used to make champagne is typically high in acid and low in alcohol, which is the kind of wine made in areas such as Champagne in which the climate makes it difficult to fully ripen grapes. Malolactic fermentation, if used to settle the acidity of the wine, would be done during this stage. It is then given a dose of sugar and yeast to create a second fermentation, which is where the bubbles are formed. The Champagne has a crown seal applied (like a beer bottle) and it is then stored in an angled position so that the sediment thrown during the fermentation process settles down into the neck of the bottle. The bottles are riddled (shaken slightly and turned) to ensure that the sediments settles well. The sediment is called lees. Leaving it on the lees, which is in essence dead yeast gives a bready character to the wine (often described as yeasty, ready, or brioche like). Each bottle is then lowered into a freezing bath to freeze the lees. Then the wine is disgorged by removing the crown seal (the carbon dioxide pressure in the bottle forces the frozen lees out). A dose of wine or sweetened wine is then added to give the Champagne its character.

 

The transfer method processes used to make sparkling wine sees the base wine undergoing a secondary fermentation in bottles without being riddled. The bottles are then emptied it into a tank under pressure where it is filtered, dosed and then rebottled. This method is cheaper than the traditional method because it doesn't involve the manual process of riddling.

 

The tank method does all the secondary fermentation in the stainless steel tank and proceeds as for the transfer method. Sekt and Prosecco are examples of this style of sparkling wine. It is also used to produce other cheap sparkling wines elsewhere in the world.

 

Sweet sparkling wine does the ferment in a sealed pressured tank and interrupts fermentation by chilling the wine. The resultant sweet, low alcohol wine is fizzy. Examples include Moscato d'Asti.

 

Champagne is a high acid wine that takes a toll on the teeth of tasters.

 

My reading of this is that to achieve an acidic sparkling wine that is complex rather than simple, you'd probably need to mix a few wines together to use in making Methode Rotuts wine. It is interesting to see Muscadet being used as often this is kept on the lees to give the wine a more complex character.

 

If I were trying to make this, I'd probably used an unoaked Chardonnay, some of the Muscadet sur lie, another very highly acidic white wine (Chablis or Petit Chablis), and a small proportion of an oaky Chardonnay.

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Nick Reynolds, aka "nickrey"

"The Internet is full of false information." Plato
My eG Foodblog

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Interesting, thanks.  Much room for future experimentation.  By "leading bubbly" I meant, of course, Champagne but I did not want to get sued.

 

Unfortunately good Chablis is so wonderful (and so expensive) I don't think I'd want to use it for M.R.

 

...as much as I like M.R.

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I tried a Chablis from TJ's   ( it was from FR ) and oddly it had no Chablis flavor what so ever, so it got taken back

 

indeed Im a big fan of Chablis  it would be my go to white if there was some that was 'affordable'  TJ's used to have two ( from FR )  one 9.99 the other 12.99 from the same

 

maker  they were excellent, with the 13 being more complex but the 10 was nightly fine

 

the one they now carry might be from a different maker and it had less going on for it that the TJ's Chard from Chile.

 

odd

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I tried a Chablis from TJ's   ( it was from FR ) and oddly it had no Chablis flavor what so ever, so it got taken back

 

indeed Im a big fan of Chablis  it would be my go to white if there was some that was 'affordable'  TJ's used to have two ( from FR )  one 9.99 the other 12.99 from the same

 

maker  they were excellent, with the 13 being more complex but the 10 was nightly fine

 

the one they now carry might be from a different maker and it had less going on for it that the TJ's Chard from Chile.

 

odd

Do they notice that they sold you a still and you brought back a bubbly?

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After generous M.R. for dinner I wish I could afford a still...I'd be making rum.*

 

 

*Edit:  if I lived in New Zealand, of course.


Edited by JoNorvelleWalker (log)

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One can cobble together a small scale still with lab glassware and an Anova.... I bet for under $100 if you have the anova.

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It's not easy to enjoy a liter of MR following one's mai tai.  Horrible hiccups.  Not to mention a plastic tasting triple cream brie.  Very expensive plastic tasting triple cream brie.

 

What's worse, my MR rotutsed all over the tablecloth.  I splurged for a Baccarat flute tonight rather than my usual Baccarat large water goblet.

 

Fortunately the bread was very good.

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MR always taste better in Baccarat.

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In retrospect, by the warm light of afternoon, it wasn't just the Baccarat.  Last night I had wondered (briefly) why my CO2 cylinders were silver and why the wine was sweet.  I had an awful lot of unintentionally merry bubbles.

 

That being said, N2O MR might work quite well in a florodora imperial style. 

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What's worse, my MR rotutsed all over the tablecloth.

 

 

LOL. This term shall live-on.

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Im missing a bit here

 

Im pretty much "Standard'  on the M.Rotuts

 

did you ( Heee Heee ) make a N2O  semi-rotuts ?

 

Hee Hee

 

we might call that  a " JoNo "

 

Hee Hee


Edited by rotuts (log)
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Tonight I made a point to grab the yellow cylinders.  (Somehow my cylinders seem to be all mixed together, and I have hundreds of them.)   Dinner wasn't nearly so much fun but the tablecloth thanks me for it.  And unlike last night I finished my MR with no hiccups and just a burp or two.  N2O makes for a wicked MR, particularly when it is unexpected.

 

For water in an iSi Dave Arnold suggests two CO2 cylinders to one of N2O.  But why drink water when there is MR?

 

 

Of course the difference may be that tonight my mai tai was brown while last night it was white.

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