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New Nomiku kickstarter


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When a mechanical relay fails, it opens the circuit and cuts out the power to the heating element.

When a SSR (solid state relay) fails, it closes the circuit and powers the heating element continuously.

 

I assume all new circulators, like Nomiku, use SSR to control the heating element.

 

I am very concerned with all these wifi apps remotely controling an appliance which has more than a 1,000 watts of heating. 

 

I am sure you can remotely call the fire department when somethiong happens.

 

dcarch

Edited by dcarch (log)
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What I like the most about the Anova Precision (bated breath and all that) is that the clip attachment slides off completely, so it can be slipped easily into a more-or-less sealed environment like a cooler.

 

This Nomiku doesn't seem to offer anything new—except wi-fi—which adds deceptively little except tell you if your water is at temperature (which it bloody well should be!). Can't say I appreciate the aesthetics of it either.

 

If they added a needle probe to it so you could see the temperature of your protein through the magic of wi-fi, we'd be talking.

 

As it is? Meh.

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their $ 249 final price is going to be a bit high for the market.

 

Current Early Bird pricing is $139. Looks like the "normal" price is $149.

 

But they won't deliver until March of next year. I'm not nuts about the front-mount with the power cord running toward you... the one with a clip on the back (i.e. the way everyone else does it) seems like a much better design. Is the benefit supposed to be that you can clip it on a pot that you already own? Like you couldn't already do that with other circulators?

 

And does anyone really need wi-fi or bluetooth connectivity? I don't understand how this could ever be useful unless you had robots who could add/remove bags from the bath for you. I guess it's primarily for interfacing with their app?

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The shorter length of the circulator wouldn't stop you from using "big-ish" pots, you would just need to fill the pot so the water level is above the minimum level of the circulator.  Besides, there is a side-by-side photo of the new version and the original on Engadget.com and the new one isn't much shorter than the original.  The minimum water level on the new Nomiku is only 1.5" above the bottom of the circulator which will allow it to be used on a lot of "small-ish" pots that the original version can't be used with.  There have been several occasions where I just wanted to cook a few 63 degree eggs and having the option of using a smaller pot would have been nice.  Looking at the Engadget photo it also appears that the new version doesn't have the external power brick that some disliked on the original.

 

I actually think that having the LCD screen facing away from the bath like they are doing here is a far better solution than having it suspended over a steamy water bath, I tend to get condensation on the screen when cooking in a really hot bath and this should eliminate that problem.  Probably better for the electronics as well.

 

There are definite possibilities with the WiFi connectivity.  From the message board on their kickstarter page it looks like the WiFi connection is via the internet rather than just a peer-to-peer connection.  I can see applications like commanding the circulator turn on as you're leaving work so the bath is up to temp by the time you get home or being able to turn down the bath to a holding temp if you get delayed somewhere while your food is cooking.  Not sure if the ability to set the bath temp directly from a recipe would ever come in handy, it's easy enough to set manually.  When I get my Anova Precision Cooker I'll have a chance to play with that to see if it is of any value to me.

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From the Ars article: The new Nomiku will replace the original coil heater with a PTC heating unit.

 

I've got a Polyscience unit - the one thing that I see is really nice about the Nomiku v2 is how thin / small it is which would work well in a smaller container when cooking a single chicken breast or the like. 

 

Besides competition is good.  Drives innovation as they try to one up each other.

 

Some words were written about it here: http://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2014/08/sous-vide-startup-wants-to-take-the-tech-industrys-kitchen-darling-mainstream/

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It honestly looks like the new Nomiku is going to be able to connect to the internet and allow you to control it remotely, just like the Nest Thermostat.  If this is the case, its going to be a game changer.

 

Up until this point, I was very much an anova guy (I own gen 1. and supported gen. 2 in kickstarter), the nomiiku was cool but the anova was a better value. Now they've got the nomiku a great price, and WIFI, which is why I bought it (three sous vide machines in one house, this could be interesting).

 

What I'm looking forward to is hacking the little bugger for timed cooking sessions. So I can place my protein in the bath in the morning along with an icepack to keep it at safe temps (might even go back to using a cooler for my set up) and then remotely turning the machine on so that dinner is ready by the time I get home.  Because on most my cooks I've been sous viding them the night before, and the chilling and refrigerating them, and then throwing them in the water bath at 130 (or a few degree below final cook temp) for about 25 minutes. while I prepare side items and set the table.

 

 

I'm looking forward to this new little machine, looks like with a icepack or similar set up it will compete with the Mellow  Sous Vide machine , at more than half the cost and smaller foot print.

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  • 5 years later...

This is on their site: (https://www.nomiku.com/)

 

 

Quote

 

Hello friend,

Well, I am sorry to say that we have reached the end of the road. It is with a heavy heart (and deep-felt gratitude for your patronage) that we are writing to let you know that we are discontinuing the Nomiku Smart Cooker and Nomiku Meals effective immediately, and suspending operations. While we still believe in the concept, we simply were not able to get to a place of sustainability to keep the business going. Thank you very much for your support, it has meant a lot to myself and everyone here at Nomiku.

All our best,
Lisa
Co-Founder, CEO and Team Nomiku

 

P.S.

For any warranty questions please contact us at info@nomiku.com. All paid orders have been shipped and any future subscription orders are effectively canceled.


 

Not surprised, I backed in the KS, had problems with it and was told clean it much more often.  So I rarely use it - our polysci model has larger tubing or something for the water so it just keeps on trucking other then the electrical problem I had to send it in to get fixed.  Though it's a real work horse for us.

Edited by Raamo (log)
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On 12/17/2019 at 8:52 AM, Raamo said:

This is on their site: (https://www.nomiku.com/)

 

 

Not surprised, I backed in the KS, had problems with it and was told clean it much more often.  So I rarely use it - our polysci model has larger tubing or something for the water so it just keeps on trucking other then the electrical problem I had to send it in to get fixed.  Though it's a real work horse for us.

 

I loved the original Nomiku, it was a workhorse and had such an easy to use interface that even my non tech-inclined parents could use it (it lives with them now).  The WiFi model was not a good experience, had to send it back for replacement multiple times due to bad water level sensors that would just shut the circulator down with no warning or notice and once when the plastic housing cracked during a high-temp cook and steam got in to the electronics.  Last time I sent it back to be replaced I ordered an Anova and ended up never even taking the Nomiku out for the box it was shipped back to me in.  These days I primarily use a Joule with the Anova as a back-up, the WiFi Nomiku is still sitting in the box in case I need a back-up to the back-up.

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