• Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

Lia Tumkus

Making salted caramel spread in a Thermomix

14 posts in this topic

Hi everyone!

I was wondering if anybody have done salted caramel in the thermomix before. Sometimes I have to make it 4 times a day, and all the stirring is making me wonder if I can make it a little easier.

That's my recipe:

278g Cream

167g Glucose

176g Sugar

167g Milk

139g Butter

7,6g Fleur de Sel

7g Vanilla paste

So everything (except cream) goes to a pot, heat until 147C (stirring constantly!) and then I stir in the warm cream.

Does anybody knows if that would work in a thermomix???

I'll appreciate any inputs :D

Thanks guys!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

http://www.forumthermomix.com/index.php?topic=10660.0

The link above will take you to a recipe someone posted to the Australian Thermomix Forum site. If this doesn't help, you could do some scrolling through that site and seeing what you can find. I tried making fudge in the Thermomix last night and it came out quite soft. The taste was good so I can imagine cooking it for less time and having it as a sauce. Hope this helps a bit.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm supposed to be stirring my sugar while it's coming up to temp/color? I give it a stir or two until things are melted and cooking and maybe a swirl or three once it starts coloring. Other than that, I don't do any stirring until the cream goes in. If I'm doing it wrong, I don't want to know... 'cause that time while the sugar is cooking is spent getting other things done.


It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm thinking the stirring is because of the higher butter content in the recipe. You could try adding the butter AFTER you add the cream (and then stirring like crazy after each addition). That way you can get away with hardly stirring in your first step and the stirring you do is just to incorporate the butter.

Another idea would be to use a stick blender. Someone suggested that in the Jacques Genin caramel thread and I have been doing it ever since. My stick blender has several speeds and I use the low one. Sure saves the arm...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I melt the butter in the cream when I heat it and add them together.


It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was unable to get my caramel up to 121 C in the thermomix.

that was my first thought - I don't think the unit will heat that high.

I'd also be concerned about it sticking to the bottom, as I've had things stick in mine quite often, even though it's mixing all the time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Rumour has it the Hotmix pro will achieve the higher temperatures. Sadly only 240V.

Apparently it goes up to 190º C - the newest model - the Easy will go to 130º C and might be 120V if it comes to north america.


Edited by Kerry Beal (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cool guys! Thank you so much for the ideas and discussion... I'll give it a go changing my cooking method, adding the butter to the cream and all.

Hotmix pro sounds great! But I have no idea if I'm able to buy living in Brazil, and how much it cost... :P

Thanks again!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Rumour has it the Hotmix pro will achieve the higher temperatures. Sadly only 240V.

Apparently it goes up to 190º C - the newest model - the Easy will go to 130º C and might be 120V if it comes to north america.

Kerry... do we need a new toy? I think we might! I would love a machine with the capability to make caramel. I use a lot of butter in my caramels so need to do a lot of stirring. The Hotmix Pro increases in temp. 1 degree at a time. It's the perfect caramel making tool!

I haven't done a lot of research but found these technical specs that state that the Gastro IS available in 110V.

I won't be running out to buy it tomorrow but it's definitely on my wish list (she says massaging her poor sore neck from too much stirring....)

http://www.hotmixpro.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=385&Itemid=105〈=en

Thanks for pointing out this machine!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Rumour has it the Hotmix pro will achieve the higher temperatures. Sadly only 240V.

Apparently it goes up to 190º C - the newest model - the Easy will go to 130º C and might be 120V if it comes to north america.

Kerry... do we need a new toy? I think we might! I would love a machine with the capability to make caramel. I use a lot of butter in my caramels so need to do a lot of stirring. The Hotmix Pro increases in temp. 1 degree at a time. It's the perfect caramel making tool!

I haven't done a lot of research but found these technical specs that state that the Gastro IS available in 110V.

I won't be running out to buy it tomorrow but it's definitely on my wish list (she says massaging her poor sore neck from too much stirring....)

http://www.hotmixpro...mid=105〈=en

Thanks for pointing out this machine!

Of course we do! Of course I want the Creative that heats and cools.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Of course we do! Of course I want the Creative that heats and cools.

Of course you want the Creative! That would be an amazing machine. I was pretty excited about this machine but had an 'oh no' yesterday as I was daydreaming about it... The caramels I make have sodium bicarbonate in them (see the Jacques Genin caramels thread) and they froth up A LOT as they are cooked. I don't think that little 2L bowl could handle a recipe for a frame of caramels. I think the baking soda plays a few roles in that recipe but the most important one I would think is the boost in the Maillard reaction as the caramels cook. I wouldn't want to omit it. Boo Hoo!!

When you get your machine I'll get you to try out those caramels to see if the machine can handle it. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah - but if you crank up the RPM's when you put in the bicarb it might keep it under control.

I think you're right Kerry! You've just turned my Boo Hoo into a Woo Hoo. :smile:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Similar Content

    • By Lam
      Hi! I've been eating Okinawan purple sweet potatoes all my life, and just recently did I think of baking with them. I did some research but there's not many purple sweet potato recipes out there so if anyone knows any, please share with me. I guess I'm looking for specifically Okinawan sweet potatoes, but I think purple sweet potatoes are pretty much interchangeable. (note: they are not the same as ube, a purple yam; also different from orange sweet potatoes or "yams" which are much sweeter and have more moisture) Here is a picture for reference: 

    • By ltjazz
      Hey all,
       
      I've made thicker and creamier sorbets with 25% to 35% sugar strained fruit purees and sugar, syrups, and other stabilizers that have worked well. However, because it's so much fruit and little to no water it can be an expensive project.
       
      I am trying to make "Water Ice" or "Italian Ice" in my home ice cream machine. Think of textures similar to Rita's Water Ice, Court Pastry Shop, or Miko's in Chicago. It eats much lighter than a sorbet but isn't really icy, but it's also not thick like sorbet. Ritas uses "flavoring" and sugar, while the other two use fruit juice. I'm thinking of thinning the strained fruit juice with water and adding a stabilizer, but I'm having trouble getting this in my home ice cream machine without it freezing solid like granita.
       
      Can anyone suggest a way to use real fruit juice, water, and a combination and concentration of stabilizers to get a looser, frozen fruit dessert that isn't icy?
    • By Lam
      So I've been looking for the ultimate matcha brownies (technically blondies but it just doesn't have the same ring to it). I've made chewy and fudgy regular brownies, but I find white chocolate based blondies to be much trickier. I have made a few matcha brownie recipes in the past, but they all came out sad and cakey. So I have taken it upon myself to come up with my own recipe. My matcha brownies came out very moist and "fudgy" but not chewy. I'm thinking next time I should try using vegetable oil instead of butter and only dark brown sugar. 


    • By Mette
      I've searched high and low for a recipe for lemon mousse, firm enough to make little 'eggs' to go on a dessert plate. Ideally, it should not be based on lemon curd or lemon cream, but just plain old lemons.
      Also, please throw me the best chocolate mousse recipe EVER - I'm in a mousse phase....
      Thanks in advance.
    • By B Edulis
      Once again, I tried to recreate my mother's shortbread cookies, using her recipe, and they didn't turn out. They were so crumbly they fell apart when you picked them up. I'm very attached to this particular recipe -- she told me that she got it from the first boy who ever kissed her, whose Scottish mother was renowned for them. That's one way to get a recipe!) She made them at all holidays. Here the recipe:
      1 cup of butter
      1/2 cup of sugar
      2 cups of flour
      pinch salt
      I've been creaming the butter and suger and adding the flour, chilling it and rolling it out and baking them at about 300 degrees. They spread more than hers did and they're just way crumbly. The taste is good, though.
      I wish I could as her for advice, but she's no longer with us -- can anyone help me?
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.