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It's truffle season!


annachan
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Truffle season has started in Australia. Saw them on sale at the farmers market last week. Going rate is $2.50/gram. I'm so tempted to pick up some but I figure I better learn more about it first. Truffle just isn't something I can afford to waste.

So, I did some research and found a few things about truffled eggs. You place some eggs with the truffle in an airtight container and allow the eggs to absorb the flavor. Sounds divine. But I do have a few questions.

From what I've read, it said to leave the eggs in with the truffle for 48 hours. What do you do after the 48 hours? Do you remove the eggs from the container? If so, will the flavor go away? Or can the eggs be kept in with the truffle until it's used. I think you're supposed to use it up in 2 weeks.

I know truffle and egg is a great flavor combination and no doubt I'll be making several different eggs and truffle dishes. What else? What are some good dishes that will highlight the truffle?

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Ok you've had the truffle in with the eggs so you have two choices:-

ONE - Go for the best eggs ever, scramble your truffled eggs, and then shave the truffle over the scrambled egg. If you have never done this then do it.

TWO - Use the truffled eggs for the unique things they are just enjoy.

Use the truffle for what whatever truffle dish takes your fancy - top tip use ASAP, and forget the cost.

(Alba White Truffle shaved over warm HP Baked beans on toast - WTF)

Time flies like an arrow, fruit flies like a banana.

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This is why I would never buy a truffle, I wouldn't be able to decide what to with it, shaved over pasta? Incorporated in a sauce? Part of a stuffing? Part of a marinade? Bruschetta? Salade? Soup? Make a rotary evaporator and distill it's taste? Oh god, my head hurts just thinking about it, I have a jar of truffle salsa that I don't even dare touching, let alone a fresh one!

But I guess if I really would have to do something with it, maybe try to make a whole romantic dinner for two in which each dish is made with a bit of the truffle?

"My rule of life prescribed as an absolutely sacred rite smoking cigars and also the drinking of alcohol before, after and if need be during all meals and in the intervals between them."

-Winston Churchill

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This is why I would never buy a truffle, I wouldn't be able to decide what to with it, shaved over pasta? Incorporated in a sauce? Part of a stuffing? Part of a marinade? Bruschetta? Salade? Soup? Make a rotary evaporator and distill it's taste? Oh god, my head hurts just thinking about it, I have a jar of truffle salsa that I don't even dare touching, let alone a fresh one!

I feel the same way. I got a set of truffle items a few years ago - small jars of truffle salt, truffle honey and sliced truffle in oil. Never used it because it was precious. When I moved and couldn't take it with me, I had to give them away.

The good thing is, I can purchase any amount at the market. They will cut up the truffle and sell you $20 of it. Knowing I can buy in small amount is really tempting.

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Look for years my mother had all these "special occasion only" items that she saved to use on a special occasion.

No special occasion ever arrived and she threw it all away!

USE them tomorrow.

Tomorrow is a special occasion, celebrate YOU.

God thats so corny

Wawa Sizzli FTW!

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This is why I would never buy a truffle, I wouldn't be able to decide what to with it, shaved over pasta? Incorporated in a sauce? Part of a stuffing? Part of a marinade? Bruschetta? Salade? Soup?

I can't see marinating with truffles.

My favorite way is to slice black truffles wafer thin, and push them under the skin of chicken thighs. Then I rub the thighs with duck fat, season, and bake on a rack -- the smallest roasting pan I own.

The rendered truffle duck/chicken fat gets saved for potatoes, risotto, you name it. The thighs are just about the best thing I've ever eaten.

White truffles? -- I only shave them onto finished dishes. And not nearly as often as I'd like.

Who cares how time advances? I am drinking ale today. -- Edgar Allan Poe

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Look for years my mother had all these "special occasion only" items that she saved to use on a special occasion.

No special occasion ever arrived and she threw it all away!

My husband's family always looks at me askance because I haul out the good china and the 'fancy' meals so often when they stay with us. Because my motto is "what's the point in having it if you aren't using it".

But back to truffles...

I recall watching an episode of The Cook and the Chef that was all about truffles, and there are some good ideas there. But the two things I have always wanted to try are truffled brie and the Truffled Egg Pasta from Buon Ricardo.

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Is that what my dogs are finding to eat in the woods? I thought maybe 'roo droppings. Seriously, anyone know anything about foraging for the things?

It's almost never bad to feed someone.

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It is possible to grow truffles. Not easy. There are people doing that here in the USA.

dcarch

Do you have any links or books about that? I'm starting a garden this summer, so that might be a fun project once the easy stuff gets going.

"My rule of life prescribed as an absolutely sacred rite smoking cigars and also the drinking of alcohol before, after and if need be during all meals and in the intervals between them."

-Winston Churchill

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It is possible to grow truffles. Not easy. There are people doing that here in the USA.

dcarch

Do you have any links or books about that? I'm starting a garden this summer, so that might be a fun project once the easy stuff gets going.

I don't have links saved. I think you buy trees inoculated with spores from the supplier, prepare the ground according to their instructions and in time, you will get truffles.

What I don’t remember is where you can get a pig or a dog that is trained to sniff out truffles. Without the sniff-er, the whole effort may be meaningless.

dcarch

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Is that what my dogs are finding to eat in the woods? I thought maybe 'roo droppings. Seriously, anyone know anything about foraging for the things?

As far as I know they're only found in trufferies here, grown mostly from hazelnut trees that have been deliberately treated with the spores, so if you are foraging and finding them, either roo droppings are an undiscovered delicacy, or you're trespassing :raz: . They comes mostly from Tassie and WA, and it looks like they might just be the next emu farm craze, except that people are probably more likely to buy truffles than emu.

Perigord

Bones Truffe

Wine and Truffle Co

Darn you Anna! I want to try truffles now....

Ps. There are apparently native

truffles as well

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It is possible to grow truffles. Not easy. There are people doing that here in the USA.

dcarch

Do you have any links or books about that? I'm starting a garden this summer, so that might be a fun project once the easy stuff gets going.

I don't have links saved. I think you buy trees inoculated with spores from the supplier, prepare the ground according to their instructions and in time, you will get truffles.

What I don’t remember is where you can get a pig or a dog that is trained to sniff out truffles. Without the sniff-er, the whole effort may be meaningless.

dcarch

Hmmm, perhaps at a later time then, that sounds like a major investment in time and money, still surprising that you can grow the little lovelies, I always heard you couldn't.

"My rule of life prescribed as an absolutely sacred rite smoking cigars and also the drinking of alcohol before, after and if need be during all meals and in the intervals between them."

-Winston Churchill

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Ps. There are apparently native

truffles as well

Thanks for the link. The jury is still out. I might be able to keep up with the old Dalmatian as she follows her nose into the bush but she's crafty about not sharing her food.

It's almost never bad to feed someone.

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Nobody around me sells whle truffles, anyone know a reputable online dealer they've ordered from with satisfactory results?

If at all possible, buy truffles from your buddy who happens to be a chef at a good restaurant. Even better, from your buddy who lives in the Aosta valley (a very unlikely buddy).

The upshot is, you want to get the goods as close to the source as possible. Every time a truffle changes hands, the price jumps and the "cream of the crop" is skimmed away.

Who cares how time advances? I am drinking ale today. -- Edgar Allan Poe

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