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Chris Amirault

Your Go-To Vinaigrette Recipe

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How do you store your vinaigrette, after you make it, and how much do you make at a time?

I don't. I think it loses it's flavour. I make it in the bowl I'm going to toss the salad in, then put the leaves on top. Then toss at the table.

Ok, thanks. I'm a bit lazy, and I'm prone to skip leafy greens if it's not convenient, so I like to keep some mixed up. I've just never had any stay emulsified this long. I'm wondering if it's the mustard or if it's the use of the immersion blender.


Tracy

Lenexa, KS, USA

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How do you store your vinaigrette, after you make it, and how much do you make at a time?

I don't always store it, but if I do it's in the fridge. I take it out when I start getting dinner going to warm up.

Any particular reason you put it in the fridge? Is it because you use garlic? If it's just straight oil, vinegar, mustard and pepper, would there be a safety reason to refrigerate it, or just a keep-the-flavor reason?

I haven't done vinaigrette (or salads, for that matter) for more than a couple of years. I used to hate salad dressings, and still strongly dislike any that are creamy, so I'm just not used to what you're supposed to do with vinaigrette, once it's made.

BTW, thanks for starting this topic!


Tracy

Lenexa, KS, USA

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I've just never had any stay emulsified this long. I'm wondering if it's the mustard or if it's the use of the immersion blender.

From my recent reading on emulsions, it's a bit of both: a strong chemical emulsifier and a strong mechanical emulsifier can work wonders.

Any particular reason you put it in the fridge? Is it because you use garlic? If it's just straight oil, vinegar, mustard and pepper, would there be a safety reason to refrigerate it, or just a keep-the-flavor reason?

I'm not really sure -- force of habit more than anything for me, and I don't know the safety reasons beyond a vague sense that colder=better.


Chris Amirault

camirault@eGstaff.org

eG Ethics Signatory

Sir Luscious got gator belts and patty melts

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My preferred vinaigrette is hazelnut oil, pear flavored white balsamic and a teaspoon of Dijon mustard, sea salt and pepper. The hazelnut oil is fairly mild as is the pear balsamic. Both taste and remind me of the pears and hazelnuts from Oregon. I just whisk it by hand in a bowl. It's delicious on a salad of sliced pear, toasted hazelnuts, bleu cheese and greens. I usually only make enough to dress two small salads and don't store it.

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My recent favorite has been a lemon anchovy dressing, with the following proportions:

1 clove garlic

3 anchovies

2 Tbs lemon juice

3 Tbs extra virgin olive oil*

salt and freshly ground pepper to taste

I basically mince the garlic and anchovy into a paste together with some kosher salt, put that plus the remaining ingredients in a mason jar, and shake vigorously... Really really good served over arugula and shaved zucchini...

Emily

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Balsamic vinegar is an ABSOLUTE no-no for me.

I use a heavy bottomed bar glass and pour in about a quarter-inch of good Italian red wine vinegar. I dissolve a large pinch of sea salt, a huge grind of black pepper, some dried oregano on the bud if I have it. Stir to dissolve spices. Then about an inch of good olive oil (usually Murray's Greek here in NYC, which is raw and fruity), and whisk with a fork.

Have substituted lemon juice for the wine vinegar in summer with good results. Also have used good white wine and sherry vinegars.

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From my recent reading on emulsions, it's a bit of both: a strong chemical emulsifier and a strong mechanical emulsifier can work wonders.

I'm not really sure -- force of habit more than anything for me, and I don't know the safety reasons beyond a vague sense that colder=better.

Thanks Chris!


Tracy

Lenexa, KS, USA

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The older I get the simpler I want my dressing. Assuming we are talking about a basic mix of green lettuces, I have taken to using good Italian white wine vinegar. I make an emulsion with a little dijon mustard and olive oil. I don't measure, but my preference is for more olive oil than the standard 3:1 that my mother always used. I like to taste the olive oil, and have the salad not too acidic. I add salt and pepper after a brief toss with the dressing, and toss some more.

I sometimes use a small amount of balsamic if I want that flavor. For a fruity salad I would add more balsamic. I also make a lot of warm rice salads when I have leftover chicken or ham or whatever, and for some reason I like to use sherry wine vinegar for that. For avocados or sliced raw fennel I like just lemon and oil, no vinegar, no dijon.

I just emulsify briefly, with a fork, can't be bothered shaking in a jar. And I only make enough for one salad. I have no idea why, but I don't like keeping dressing in the fridge. Maybe because sometimes it just doesn't get used and becomes a jar of something icky that I have to deal with.

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Lately I've been partial to anchovies in my vinaigrette, particularly for sturdier greens like romaine or endive, broccoli, green beans. Either a Caesar-type vinaigrette (everything in a Caesar dressing, except egg/mayo) or with minced shallot and/or capers.

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Old Spanish proverb --

"A spendthrift with the oil and a miser with the vinegar."

That's the rule I follow.

Basio recipe: olive oil, white wine vinegar, shallot, salt, pepper, mustard, herbs.

Some things get subbed in/out depending on whatever I'm using it with.

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