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I'm in a Broccoli Cul-de-Sac


Chris Amirault
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I need help. I just keep driving around the same boring broccoli boulevard: sautéed over high heat, usually in the oil leftover from some garlic and a dried red chile or two, and served with a splash of lemon or other acid. Surely there are other ways to prepare this strange cabbage.

Chris Amirault

eG Ethics Signatory

Sir Luscious got gator belts and patty melts

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I really like the slightly bitter and mineral taste of a green like broccoli so I keep it fairly plain. I put it in a large pan with a tight lid, a bit of butter and a few tablespoons of a gelatinous chicken stock (freezer staple) and let it go until tender to my liking. I start out with a minimal amount of water because I want the pan to be dry when I am done. The butter and stock really seem to penetrate well. Although I am an acid fan, I do not care for it with broccoli- it seems to mask one of the flavor elements that appeals to me in the vegetable.

Once in a while I treat it like gai lan in a dim sum fashion and toss with oyster sauce and garlic nubs.

When I have the luxury of picking it from the garden I prefer it cooked again in a pan with minimal water and left a little more al dente. This gets piled on a warm plate and eaten with our hands, dipping into a garlic or mustard mayo.

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Steam to your preferred doneness and serve with a vinaigrette or lemon butter?

I am the least imaginative person here. :sad:

This is my skillet. There are many like it, but this one is mine. My skillet is my best friend. It is my life. I must master it, as I must master my life. Without me my skillet is useless. Without my skillet, I am useless. I must season my skillet well. I will. Before God I swear this creed. My skillet and myself are the makers of my meal. We are the masters of our kitchen. So be it, until there are no ingredients, but dinner. Amen.

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Darienne reminded be about the salad that seems to be in every deli case or buffet table in the last few years. The broccoli is chopped and raw (although I prefer it barely steamed to just take the edge off) and tossed with bacon bits, red onion, raisins or dried cranberries, sunflower seeds or toasted nuts, mayo and a little acid. Most recipes include sugar and some call for cheese which makes no sense to me. Well marinated, I find it enjoyable.

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Steam the florets til barely done, then toss with a dressing of equal portions rice vinegar, dark sesame oil, soy sauce, and honey. Top with roasted sesame seeds. Add bite-sized pieces of shrimp or chicken, if desired.

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Darienne reminded be about the salad that seems to be in every deli case or buffet table in the last few years. The broccoli is chopped and raw (although I prefer it barely steamed to just take the edge off) and tossed with bacon bits, red onion, raisins or dried cranberries, sunflower seeds or toasted nuts, mayo and a little acid. Most recipes include sugar and some call for cheese which makes no sense to me. Well marinated, I find it enjoyable.

One of the surprises about the salad I listed is that the broccoli is not steamed at all...thus saving the harried cook one step...particularly if she is harried at the time...but it's still perfect. I didn't expect to be carried away by it. :wub:

Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

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I don't get tired of brocoli your way, Chris. But I'm also a fan of tossing steamed broccoli with some crumpled feta, slivered kalamata olives, sauted garlic w/ evoo, and red pepper flakes.

Can you roast broccoli the way you can roast cauliflower?


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Can you roast broccoli the way you can roast cauliflower?

Yes it roasts well but because of its nature you have even more of that issue with even crisping. The little round bits from the floret tend to detach or get over done. It is worth doing at least once to see if you like it.

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It's a little time-consuming, but I've enjoyed the Broccoli Gratin with Mustard-Cheese Streusel on the Epicurious site.

You make a topping of bread crumbs, dry and prepared mustard, and parmesan cheese. Boil the broccoli, mix it with some cream, top and pop in the oven. Seems like it could be simplified for everyday use.

Dave Scantland
Executive director
dscantland@eGstaff.org
eG Ethics signatory

Eat more chicken skin.

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I like it roasted or grilled like cauliflower, too. To me, the crispy, slightly burnt buds are the best part. I usually do it with a little oil and curry powder or bbq seasoning mix.

"Life is a combination of magic and pasta." - Frederico Fellini

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giardiniera

alfredo sauce

jullienned to replace cabbage in mu shu

jullienned to replace cabbage in egg rolls

pulao

fried rice

enchiladas with green chile sauce

finely chopped and added raw to a ricotta layer in lasagna

soup: cream of, or added towards the end of cooking to noodle types

in a salad after lightly steaming and cooling

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We eat a lot of broccoli. Mostly blanched and stir fried with mushrooms, garlic and grated parm cheese. That just seems the best. Old fashioned Southern broccoli casserole works for me as well though.

Edited by Doodad (log)
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giardiniera

I would be very interested in a recipe for broccoli giardiniera. :smile:

My mom gave me a good one in the 80's. I have lost it, and she doesn't remember the incident at all so we have no idea where it came from. It was a mix of vegetables, but designed to be eaten right away, so it had some vegetables in it that wouldn't hold up to the canning process. (I think that many recipes out there are for a home-canned finished product.)

I am also in the middle of preparing to move, and have limited access to a home kitchen. I will get back to this in a few weeks when I have my own place. I do recall steaming vegetables in my bamboo steamer over a pot of boiling, salty, vinegar based liquid, cooling and then combining them. Anyway, I have been wanting to perfect a recipe for giardiniera it's at the top of my 'test kitchen' list of projects because it's just such a good counterpoint to tomato sauced items -like as a nibble with an eggplant parm sandwich. So, I'll post in a few weeks.

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There's always broc and hollandaise Or roasted with some olive oil and garlic. The roasted garlic is a wonderful foil to the broc. Or a gratin. Dave's link to that recipe is pretty close to mine. Or as a crudite. Blanch, chill, serve with an awesome dip. Cream of broccoli soup. The possibilities are endless.

Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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Roasted, tossed first with garlicky olive oil and lots of finely shredded parm or asiago or pecorino or whatever grating cheese I happen to have in the fridge. Tossed on a sheet pan and in the oven until brown and crispy. Never even makes it to the table, I always end up eating it right off of the cookie sheet.

If you ate pasta and antipasto, would you still be hungry? ~Author Unknown

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I cook a Thai-style stirfried broccoli with oyster sauce from Kasma Loha-Unchit. An adapted version of the recipe is here:

http://www.food.com/recipe/stir-fried-broccoli-with-thai-oyster-sauce-236965

I like to sear some steak strips, remove them from the pan, then cook the broccoli. Towards the end of cooking time, I return the meat to the pan and let it cook with the vegs. I serve this stirfry over steamed rice. It's an easy dinner.

I also like that Chinese-American standby, beef with broccoli in a garlic, ginger, soy sauce.

Another broccoli recipe for dinner, from the Mediterranean, Judy Rodgers' recipe for Pasta with Spicy Broccoli & Cauliflower in the Zuni Cafe Cookbook. You can make this dish with all broccoli, all cauliflower, or a combo. I like this dish in the winter, when broccoli and cauliflower, along with winter greens, are the best-looking vegs in the market. An adapted recipe is here:

http://www.thestar.com/living/food/recipes/article/572369--pasta-with-spicy-broccoli-cauliflower

I also like broccoli as a pizza topping, with sausage and tomato sauce. To make the pizza: Blanche some broccoli florets, drain well, and chop into 1/2" pieces. Toss with garlic oil. On a round of pizza dough, spread on some tomato sauce, then top with crumbled Italian sausage (casings removed) and the broccoli pieces. Sprinkle on some shredded mozzarella and grated pecorino romano. Bake. This makes a hearty dinner pizza.

I used to make a broccoli casserole from the Moosewood Cookbook. I brought it to potlucks, and people liked it. Chris? Chris? Are you still there? This is my version of Broccoli Mushroom Noodle Casserole: Heat some butter in a skillet and saute 2 stalks of broccoli with florets, cut up; 1 lb sliced mushrooms; 1 large onion, chopped. Season well with S&P. When the vegs are tender, remove from the heat & toss with 1/4 cup dry white wine; set aside. While the vegs are cooking, combine 3 eggs with 3 cups ricotta or cottage cheese (or combo) and 1 cup sour cream in a large bowl; set aside. Boil 3 cups of egg noodles in salted water until slightly underdone. Drain well and butter. With a slotted spoon remove the vegs from the pan. Combine the vegs, egg mixture, and noodles. Spread the mixture in a 9X13 baking dish. Top with breadcrumbs, and if desired, 1/4 cup of grated sharp cheddar, Asiago, or parmesan. Cover and bake in a 350 degree oven for 30 mins, then uncovered for 15 more mins, until the casserole is cooked through.

Really, people liked it.

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