• Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

KD1191

Rogue (now beta) Cocktails

247 posts in this topic

Finally - finally - got around to making a Broken Shoe Shiner tonight. Magical drink. Rosewater and pastis... who knew?

That one sounds kinda scary to me... but you've given me some good recommendations so I'm going to give it a try.


It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I like the Broken Shoe Shiner, but it can tend to be overly sweet and sweet + anise = candy, an association I don't like. I used absinthe instead of Pernod and that helped. It might need a touch more lemon than the recipe call for. It will also depend upon the sweetness of the pineapple (fresh, or at least something better than those little Dole cans). Let us know what you think, Tri.


Kindred Cocktails | Craft + Collect + Concoct + Categorize + Community

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Book landed on my doorstep this evening and I decided to open with A Moment of Silence. Used Marasaka instead of Marie for the apricot component and Amaro Montenegro instead of the Averna because, well, I don't have Averna.


Chris Taylor

Host, eG Forums - ctaylor@egstaff.org

 

I've never met an animal I didn't enjoy with salt and pepper.

Melbourne
Harare, Victoria Falls and some places in between

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Had been eyeing the DLB for quite some time, finally got around to it the other night:

1 Barbancourt 8 (I used .5 Barbancourt 4 and .5 ED 12 as I have no 8 on hand, no idea if that approximates the 8 or not)

.5 lemon

.5 fernet

.5 simple

.5 angostura

.25 angostura orange

.25 peychauds

Surprisingly more tart that bitter, the flavors just seemed to pop. Would definitely make this again.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just set up a modified Ashtray Heart. No regular sweet vermouth, so I used Punt. And no grapefruits kicking around, so a gentle dash of grapefruit bitters (Fee's) sounded like the a good option. Could've gone lemon, I guess. Have a tree and everything. But it's out in this cold. Anyway, the drink itself is verging on being a bit of a beast, altho' it's nothing like the Racketeer or Translantic Giant, which are delicious obscenities. This isn't bad. I like it.

Also, because I live in the far east, Inner Circle Green instead of S&C.


Edited by ChrisTaylor (log)

Chris Taylor

Host, eG Forums - ctaylor@egstaff.org

 

I've never met an animal I didn't enjoy with salt and pepper.

Melbourne
Harare, Victoria Falls and some places in between

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just set up a modified Ashtray Heart. No regular sweet vermouth, so I used Punt.

Made this tonight too, and liked it quite a bit. It does call for Punt e Mes, so you didn't deviate there.


Kindred Cocktails | Craft + Collect + Concoct + Categorize + Community

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Improved Scotch Cocktail linked earlier in the thread. Used Ardbeg Uigeadail, as it's my favourite Islay that I have at the moment. Went a little short on the lemon juice, purely because I don't like it when whisk(e)y-based cocktails--Ward Eights, et al--are knocked around too much by the sourness of lemons.

At the moment I'm sipping on a Trans-European Express. Don't have Macallan so I opted for ... gee, I was looking at what might sound like a sensible choice, say, a Glenfiddich or even the Aberlour but instead I threw caution to the wind and reached for Talisker 10 (which, incidentally, is my go-to scotch for classic scotch-based cocktails such as the Blood and Sand). Nice enough. Better, I think, than the Trans-Atlantic, which was nice enough, too, sure, but maybe wasn't quite that great because of the creme de cacao. I couldn't tell if it was because I bought the Baitz stuff (an Australian liqueur company--their other liqueurs have served me well enough, so I have no reason to be sus about the cacao [of course, you'd think I could buy Marie Brizzard ... and, true, the MB range has started appearing on Australian shelves all over the place, priced on par with Baitz and others, but of course they have like three fucking kinds of curacao and not even one kind of creme de cacao--unless I want to go Nick's and pay literally twice the going rate ... for something I'll probably only use for Trans-Atlantics]) or because creme de cacao just reminds me far too fucking vividly of cheap chocolate, liek all those bad giant-sized Easter eggs you'd get from relatives as a kid and the whole time you're just wishing they'd buy you one small good egg.

But. Yeah. This book. So far everything has been a winner. Haven't tried that pineapple/Pernod/whatever lobster and, to be honest, Mr Wondrich seems to have a very similar palate to me. Mostly. So I guess at some point I will try it, when I remember to buy pineapple juice and all, but I won't be too concerned if it's the very last drink I try. And between now and then I need to make/get kummel (which is fine, as it's great) and some South East Asian rotgutrumstuff. So. It'll be a while yet.


Chris Taylor

Host, eG Forums - ctaylor@egstaff.org

 

I've never met an animal I didn't enjoy with salt and pepper.

Melbourne
Harare, Victoria Falls and some places in between

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Realized I had finally gotten a copy of the book but hadn't delved into it yet. So tonight I went "Under the Volcano". Always a fan of a good tequila cocktail and this did not disappoint.

IMG_6167mod.jpg

Anejo tequila (I substituted El Major for Tesoro since both were highland tequilas and I hoped that might make it a decent sub) along with lime juice, yellow chartreuse, cynar and agave nectar. Plenty of agave flavor in this but the cynar seemed to keep it from being too sweet. Definitely one to make again.

This was one of the few recipes to have some quantities listed with a minus sign such as -1/2 oz Cynar. The book notes it uses "industry-standard vernacular" so I hope you will forgive this mere lay persons ignorance but does that just mean a "light pour" of that particular measurement?

Speaking of ignorance the next drink, the Vellocet, instructs one to "blue blazer" green chartreuse on the mint sprig garnish. Now, I am familiar with the Blue Blazer cocktail where one tries to light themselves on fire for no apparent reason by repeatedly pouring flaming scotch back and forth between two glasses. Do they mean to suggest that one annoint the mint with chartreuse and then set it ablaze briefly? That is what the picture suggests since the mint sprig looks a bit worse for wear.

BTW, is there a sound reason for the Blue Blazer cocktail other than to pretend to be Jerry Thomas and put on a show (especially if you end up setting your hair on fire!)? Does it add anything to the drink itself other than to likely burn off the alcohol content?


If you pick up a starving dog and make him prosperous, he will not bite you. This is the principal difference between a dog and a man. ~Mark Twain

Some people are like a Slinky. They are not really good for anything, but you still can't help but smile when you shove them down the stairs...

~tanstaafl2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This was one of the few recipes to have some quantities listed with a minus sign such as -1/2 oz Cynar. The book notes it uses "industry-standard vernacular" so I hope you will forgive this mere lay persons ignorance but does that just mean a "light pour" of that particular measurement?

My lay interpretation of this is that it means approximately 3/8 oz but given no one has that measure it's easier to say a scant half-ounce.


Edited by sbumgarner (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Do they mean to suggest that one annoint the mint with chartreuse and then set it ablaze briefly? That is what the picture suggests since the mint sprig looks a bit worse for wear.

The mint should be singed via flaming chartreuse. Warm the chartreuse and set it aflame, then drizzle it over/down the mint sprig.


Edited by KD1191 (log)

True rye and true bourbon wake delight like any great wine...dignify man as possessing a palate that responds to them and ennoble his soul as shimmering with the response.

DeVoto, The Hour

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Do they mean to suggest that one annoint the mint with chartreuse and then set it ablaze briefly? That is what the picture suggests since the mint sprig looks a bit worse for wear.

The mint should be singed via flaming chartreuse. Warm the chartreuse and set it aflame, then drizzle it over/down the mint sprig.

What, you don't flame it out an atomizer like Boudreau does with Angostura? :wink:


Matthew Kayahara

Kayahara.ca

@mtkayahara

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I asked Maks if -1/2 really meant 3/8 and as I recall he said that it was intended to indicate a slightly light pour, subject to the bartender's judgment. I interpret it as "just shy of 1/2 and take care to not over pour, you klutz."


Kindred Cocktails | Craft + Collect + Concoct + Categorize + Community

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great! Thanks everyone for the insights. I look forward to continuing to explore the book.

Although that Under the Volcano was pretty darn good!


If you pick up a starving dog and make him prosperous, he will not bite you. This is the principal difference between a dog and a man. ~Mark Twain

Some people are like a Slinky. They are not really good for anything, but you still can't help but smile when you shove them down the stairs...

~tanstaafl2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Do they mean to suggest that one annoint the mint with chartreuse and then set it ablaze briefly? That is what the picture suggests since the mint sprig looks a bit worse for wear.

The mint should be singed via flaming chartreuse. Warm the chartreuse and set it aflame, then drizzle it over/down the mint sprig.

What, you don't flame it out an atomizer like Boudreau does with Angostura? :wink:

Oh, I wouldn't try to stop anyone from doing it that way (good way to lose your eyebrows). But, I've seen it made more than a couple of times, both at The Violet Hour & Cure (it's one of my wife's favorites), and it's generally been more of a slow burn dripping down the sprig than a quick flash fry.


True rye and true bourbon wake delight like any great wine...dignify man as possessing a palate that responds to them and ennoble his soul as shimmering with the response.

DeVoto, The Hour

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Fatigue. Equal parts Jack Daniels (I used the Gentleman variant), maraschino and Angostura bitters with a grapefruit twist. It's okay. Somewhat kind of totally dominated by cinnamon. Drinkable but not repeatable.


Chris Taylor

Host, eG Forums - ctaylor@egstaff.org

 

I've never met an animal I didn't enjoy with salt and pepper.

Melbourne
Harare, Victoria Falls and some places in between

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Tonight it was the Transatlantic Giant. I kind of expected it to be unusual given the ingredients, kind of Airbag-ish in that they didn't seem to fit together. Had to sub Elmer T. Lee as I didn't have Buffalo Trace in the house.

IMG_6173mod.jpg

But it did all come together very nicely. Not quite as good as an Airbag to me but certainly one I would have again. The Creme de Cacao did give it an interesting sweet finish. Wouldn't think it would stand up to everything else in the drink but it did a pretty good job of holding its own.


If you pick up a starving dog and make him prosperous, he will not bite you. This is the principal difference between a dog and a man. ~Mark Twain

Some people are like a Slinky. They are not really good for anything, but you still can't help but smile when you shove them down the stairs...

~tanstaafl2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Fatigue. Equal parts Jack Daniels (I used the Gentleman variant), maraschino and Angostura bitters with a grapefruit twist. It's okay. Somewhat kind of totally dominated by cinnamon. Drinkable but not repeatable.

This drink was created by a bartender for bartenders at the end of shift. It tastes very different after you have straw tasted 150 citrus drinks and 100 brown and stirred. You have serious palate fatigue, thus the name, and you need something with HUGE flavors. Trust me this is really tasty at 2:30am on a Friday night.


A DUSTY SHAKER LEADS TO A THIRSTY LIFE

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Arbitrary Nature of Time specifies Wild Turkey 101 -- but not whether it's rye or bourbon. I'll make the latter in a sec, but, meanwhile, does anyone know which it is? Or whether it's... wait for it... arbitrary?!?

ETA: Based entirely on the deliciousness of the libation I'm enjoying, my money is on bourbon.


Edited by Chris Amirault (log)

Chris Amirault

camirault@eGstaff.org

eG Ethics Signatory

Sir Luscious got gator belts and patty melts

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Arbitrary Nature of Time specifies Wild Turkey 101 -- but not whether it's rye or bourbon. I'll make the latter in a sec, but, meanwhile, does anyone know which it is? Or whether it's... wait for it... arbitrary?!?

ETA: Based entirely on the deliciousness of the libation I'm enjoying, my money is on bourbon.

At The Counting Room, Maks makes it with rye.


True rye and true bourbon wake delight like any great wine...dignify man as possessing a palate that responds to them and ennoble his soul as shimmering with the response.

DeVoto, The Hour

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Made it again with WT 101 bourbon tonight for a guest -- using up the last ounce of the "natural carmine" Campari as a result! When I restock with non-bug Campari, I'll give it a go with the WT 101 rye.


Chris Amirault

camirault@eGstaff.org

eG Ethics Signatory

Sir Luscious got gator belts and patty melts

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Similar Content

    • By Mike.jj
      Hello Egullet family.. its good to be back on here, been away for a while, i hope to find some new trending recipes .. and be ready to get some African dish recipes for those who love African Dishes, You can Read and  Download  Mp3 Audios here of some Nigerian dishes, and there are more coming in which i would be placing on here.. Thanks
    • By FrogPrincesse
      I've been eying this book since I heard about its upcoming release. For me, a cocktail book with a French slant is a hugely appealling. I flipped through it at my local bookstore and was compelled to buy it when I saw a recipe calling for Byrrh, along with a few re-interpreted classics. The recipes are not overly complex and generally don't call for esoteric ingredients. If you have Sam Ross' Bartender's Choice app, it's in the same vein but with a definite French (and international) touch, with recipes calling for things like Suze, Armagnac or Japanese whisky.
       
      Measurements are given in milliliters and ounces, and were probably conceived in metric so they can be a bit unusual sometimes, but this is not a big deal at all. Each recipe is provided with a little background about its creation or general concept, which I always find the most interesting part of these types of books.
       
      The first thing I mixed was the Byrrh cocktail of course. It had quite a few other ingredients, but luckily I had everything already on hand.
       
      Handsome Jack (Chris Tanner) with Rittenhouse straight rye, Pierre Ferrand 1840, Aperol, Byrrh, green Chartreuse, maple syrup, Angostura and Peychaud's bitters.
       
      As indicated in the notes, it is slightly on the sweet side but it has a slight bitterness that compensates for that (from the Byrrh and Aperol). The flavor is deep and complex. There is almost like a chestnut note with the maple syrup and cognac, and a nice kick from the rye. A very good fall/winter drink.
       
       

       
      Review of the book on Eater.
       
       
    • By Lisa Shock
      The team over at Modernist Cuisine announced today that their next project will be an in-depth exploration of bread. I personally am very excited about this, I had been hoping their next project would be in the baking and pastry realm. Additionally, Francisco Migoya will be head chef and Peter Reinhart will assignments editor for this project which is expected to be a multi-volume affair.
    • By liuzhou
      Another great article from the great Harold McGee. "The Science of Herbs and Spices" on Lucky Peach.
       
      Fascinating as ever.
       
      Now I just need to find the Chinese for "chitosan".
    • By Secret_Ingredient
      I emailed OXO a while ago, asking if they could design and market a thermocouple based thermometer. I reasoned that with their market penetration, the cost would be in the same range of current thermometers. I never heard back and cannot guess why there was no response.
       
      Most consumer grade digital thermometers use a thermistor. I had one of the first Polder Probe/wire (or cable) thermos and I loved it. It had a cable or wire, shielded in a metal braid. The new ones, use a silicon covering. Most of the reviews say that probe breaks and Polder has addressed that by adding a "handle" (of sorts) to the probe. Reasonable care while inserting and extracting the probe would have been more sensible by the reviewers who broke there devices, but the handle works, too.
       
      Still, this device and as I said above, most all temperature reading devices use a thermistor, or even a bi-metal strip (don't call me a perv!). The thermocouple devices read a much more accurate temperature range. From here on I'm spelling thermocouple as t/c.
       
      The Cook's Country (and under a multitude of other names) commonly shows the Thermapen t/c. At $100 it's pricey for the kitchen, but not for what it is. I imagine there are loads of industrial, scientific, and technical uses for it. There the $100 is worth it. The website: Cooking For Engineers sells the device for a "MERE" $79.  That site reviews a number of thermometers and puts the t/c on top.
       
      So dear reader, I must ask, why have the OXO's and Sur La Tables, Williams-Sonomas, and the like not found a way to place a t/c probe in a thermometer?
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.