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Lior

ceramic chocolate bowl

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What I found was that you really need to use a pastry bag to place the milk choc on top of the white. I used a toothpick to streak and wiped the pick clean after each pass. I could only get one good bowl from each streaking. I then stirred the milk choc into the white to get a clean "pallet" and started with fresh milk choc. After, I just poured it all back into the white melter. It didn't change the color that much and the flavor can only be improved IMHO :blink: Don't know what I will do with them, but they are sort of cool.


Ruth Kendrick

Chocolot
Artisan Chocolates and Toffees
www.chocolot.com

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..


Edited by John DePaula (log)

John DePaula
formerly of DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

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Ok so here is my next attempt. I am rather satisfied,however, there are still issues. Centering the design. placing the balloon to set in such a way as the bowl will stand just right and not slightly tilted, and of course that issue of the perfect rim height!!

gallery_53591_4944_26551.jpg

note the off centeredness:

gallery_53591_4944_234782.jpg

gallery_53591_4944_212756.jpg

next experiment is the vodka and then the cb colors I so excitedly received...

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"note the off centeredness..." TSK TSK!!

Your bowls are amazing! Stunning!!

Well done!

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don't you love when people make something beautiful and they find the flaws in it just to fish for compliments :wink::laugh:

they look great Lior, and i have always been of the mind that barely noticeable (or only noticeable to you) imperfections indicate the hand made nature of items. that makes them all the more special! i wouldn't want it to look like a machine made them, in other words.

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Just poking my head in here where I don't belong--I know nothing about working with chocolate but enjoy admiring your beautiful work. For the rims of the bowls, would it work to use a wire cake leveler?

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Thanks everyone! Well it is actually much easier than it seems...

And imperfections do annoy me- although I really do want it to "hand made"- where does one draw the line? A wire cake leveler? Is that to cut a cake in half? It cuts evenly? Is it sharp? This could be a good solution if it is what I think it is. Like what Chris Hennes uses to wipe the bottoms of his bonbons? (I know that sounds a bit odd! :raz: )

Thanks!!

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Thanks everyone! Well it is actually much  easier than it seems...

And imperfections do annoy me- although I really do want it to "hand made"- where does one draw the line?  A wire cake leveler? Is that to cut a cake in half? It cuts evenly? Is it sharp? This could be a good solution if it is what I think it is. Like what Chris Hennes uses to wipe the bottoms of his bonbons? (I know that sounds a bit odd! :raz: )

Thanks!!

Maybe you could explain how Chris Hennes wipes the bottoms of his bonbons (as weird as it sounds). I'm intrigued.

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Sure ! It is a great demo and explanation. You can see the whole cutter/bottom wiper(!) in the very last picture. In the pictures above the last one you can see him wiping bottoms on the wire up close. This sounds awful!

Wiping bonbon bottoms


Edited by Lior (log)

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Sure ! It is a great demo and explanation. You can see the whole cutter/bottom wiper(!) in the very last picture. In the pictures above the last one you can see him wiping bottoms on the wire up close. This sounds awful!

Wiping bonbon bottoms

Now I know what you are talking about! I usually use the baffle on my Chocovision which I guess serves about the same purpose.

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A wire cake leveler? Is that to cut a cake in half? It cuts evenly? Is it sharp? This could be a good solution if it is what I think it is. Like what Chris Hennes uses to wipe the bottoms of his bonbons? (I know that sounds a bit odd! :raz: )

Thanks!!

Yes! That is exactly what I'm talking about. He is holding his upside down, but my idea would be to raise the wire to the desired height of your bowl, heat it up, then keep the feet of the leveler on the counter while dragging it across the bowl so that it would be a perfectly flat cut.

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Oh me oh my!

I wanted to make a gift bowl. I had to use 85% maltitol chocolate becasue it is for a diabetic. I thought to do the design with white chocolate and colored white chocolate. It is such a tiny amount that is actually on the bowl I figured it should be fine. I think what happened is that the pink/red and white chocolate must have been too viscous (SP?) or had started hardening becasue I did not get that feathered dainty look as in my previous bowls (Arghhhh!). I also forgot to do a third dipping and so the bowls are too thin. Live and learn.

gallery_53591_4944_201945.jpg

Any ideas? Maybe the circle lines were also piped on too thin? And why did the white chocolate oxidize??

A free style one

gallery_53591_4944_354901.jpg


Edited by Lior (log)

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Oh me oh  my!

I wanted to make a gift bowl. I had to use 85% maltitol chocolate becasue it is for a diabetic. I thought to do the design with white chocolate and colored white chocolate. It is such a tiny amount that is actually on the bowl I figured it should be fine. I think what happened is that the pink/red and white chocolate must have been too viscous (SP?) or had started hardening becasue I did not get that feathered dainty look as in my previous bowls (Arghhhh!). I also forgot to do a third dipping and so the bowls are too thin. Live and learn.

gallery_53591_4944_201945.jpg

Any ideas? Maybe the circle lines were also piped on too thin? And why did the white chocolate oxidize??

A free style one

gallery_53591_4944_354901.jpg

I still think the pattern looks great. Fatter lines will change the pattern somewhat.

Temper is important - another thought - when you mix compound chocolate and 'real' chocolate you sometimes see oxidation where they meet - I wonder if the maltitol has the same effect.

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What do you mean by real chocolate?! The 85% maltitol is actually 65% mixed with 100% to get 85%-both Valrhona. Now to get the "pink" I mixed some red powder into the white chocolate and this made it pink. Do you think the maltitol created the ozidization? I was very surprised to see this! I like the "free style" one more, but the colors, esp on bowl 1 did not merge very much to get different shades and a softer look. For some reason my hand was shaky so the circles weren't good (not enough morning coffee? OMG I better cut down?).

Have you done the granite yet? :smile:

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