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Not to step on highchef's toes, but I would strongly recommend sauteeing, or at least sweating, your trinity first.  Then add either your stock or pre-made roux, depending on your preference. Just note, its best to add either a cold stock to a hot roux or a cold roux to a hot stock, but not to add a hot stock to a hot roux.

I agree. I don't know anyone who follows the recipe on the roux jar exactly, which reads to throw them in after. I think most of us were taught to add veggies to halt the browning in the roux, then add your stock.

The whole idea of the jarred roux is to eliminate a step in the gumbo making process, not screwing it up. Sweating the trinity first is for sure the richer option.

good weather for gumbo.

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God Bless John Folse! I have been passing his jambalaya receipt off as family bible stuff for a decade now (One from his old PBS show, not book---too sanitized for practicality). Having said that, I would be utterly at a loss as to how best use a jar rooo. Does it have icky amts of salt?

Sidebar: anyone going by donaldsonville? Got Folse's big book I want signed.

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first ingredient listed is flour(s), then oil(soy bean)...pretty much it.

Sorry, haven't been thru Donaldsonville since McNeese played Nichols.

I want the new book, thought I'd get it for my birthday, but I guess I didn't let drop enough hints. But....that's why God made American Express and Amazon.com!! Then again, last cookbook I ordered from his site directly and it came autographed!!! There's a blank on the order-form or something, but what a nice thing for him to do!

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  • 12 years later...
On 12/19/2008 at 4:55 PM, Eden said:

This brings up an interesting question to me as I occasionally cook for gluten intolerant friends: What other grains CAN you make a roux with?


Dear heavens, this is a total necro-post, but I had to weigh in as grain-free cooking has become one of my focuses.

 

I’ve had decent success making roux with almond flour. It browns up beautifully and adds wonderful body to otherwise soupy dishes. It also picks up (obvs.) a decidedly nutty aroma which transforms into something quite exquisite if you toast the flour a bit beforehand. There’s a limit to how much it will actually thicken a dish. Almond is never going to suck up liquid like grains do, but if you need more, trading out a quarter to a third of your almond flour for coconut flour does improve things. How much you might taste coconut in the final dish depends on the sensitivity of your palate and on how much seasoning and spice are also involved. So, you might get a little coconut hit from, say, a bechamel but not a gumbo. 
 

Either way, it can make for some delicious roux-based cooking for the gluten intolerant or anyone generally avoiding starchy grains. 

Edited by GloriousDawn (log)
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“A still more glorious dawn awaits. Not a sunrise, but a galaxy rise. A morning filled with 400 billion suns. The rising of the milky way.”

 Carl Sagan, Cosmos

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I'm also grain (and many other things) free now - last time I made gumbo, I just browned the trinity until it was very deep brown, not quite burnt but almost - then thickened a bit with glucomannan powder (aka konnyaku) - be advised a little goes a VERY VERY long way, a mere pinch mixed with water first will thicken as much as any roux.

 

I also am a big okra fan so that helped to thicken the gumbo too. 

 

Results: not quite like a chocolate roux, but pretty delicious:

 

image.thumb.png.0a007fa10fd45bae4a69f1191ee3d772.png

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I use Bob's Red Mill 1:1 flour. It's not exactly the same roux as with wheat flour, but close enough.

"There is no sincerer love than the love of food."  -George Bernard Shaw, Man and Superman, Act 1

 

Gene Weingarten, writing in the Washington Post about online news stories and the accompanying readers' comments: "I basically like 'comments,' though they can seem a little jarring: spit-flecked rants that are appended to a product that at least tries for a measure of objectivity and dignity. It's as though when you order a sirloin steak, it comes with a side of maggots."

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46 minutes ago, TdeV said:

@Alex. Which flour?

 

Bob's Red Mill 1:1 Baking Flour

"There is no sincerer love than the love of food."  -George Bernard Shaw, Man and Superman, Act 1

 

Gene Weingarten, writing in the Washington Post about online news stories and the accompanying readers' comments: "I basically like 'comments,' though they can seem a little jarring: spit-flecked rants that are appended to a product that at least tries for a measure of objectivity and dignity. It's as though when you order a sirloin steak, it comes with a side of maggots."

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8 minutes ago, TdeV said:

What's in it, @Alex?

 

Click the "Nutritional Information & Ingredients" link on the web page.

"There is no sincerer love than the love of food."  -George Bernard Shaw, Man and Superman, Act 1

 

Gene Weingarten, writing in the Washington Post about online news stories and the accompanying readers' comments: "I basically like 'comments,' though they can seem a little jarring: spit-flecked rants that are appended to a product that at least tries for a measure of objectivity and dignity. It's as though when you order a sirloin steak, it comes with a side of maggots."

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@Hassouni, that looks delicious. And I’m a fellow fan of glucomannan. You are not wrong about a little going a long way. My first go at thickening gravy with it was hilarious. I could have served it in slices. 😆

 

Have you tried baking with it? It seems that a 1% (1g glucomannan:100g gf flour) addition makes a reasonably effective stand-in for gluten. Half a % glucomannan plus half a % xanthan gum has also been interesting. I’ve been using the latter where a more rigid structure is called for. 

“A still more glorious dawn awaits. Not a sunrise, but a galaxy rise. A morning filled with 400 billion suns. The rising of the milky way.”

 Carl Sagan, Cosmos

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On 5/2/2021 at 3:02 AM, GloriousDawn said:

@Hassouni, that looks delicious. And I’m a fellow fan of glucomannan. You are not wrong about a little going a long way. My first go at thickening gravy with it was hilarious. I could have served it in slices. 😆

 

Have you tried baking with it? It seems that a 1% (1g glucomannan:100g gf flour) addition makes a reasonably effective stand-in for gluten. Half a % glucomannan plus half a % xanthan gum has also been interesting. I’ve been using the latter where a more rigid structure is called for. 

 

Slices is right! Stiffer than Jell-o.

 

I haven't used it in baking, think it'd complement coconut flour?

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On 5/3/2021 at 10:15 AM, Hassouni said:

 

Slices is right! Stiffer than Jell-o.

 

I haven't used it in baking, think it'd complement coconut flour?


Can see it balancing coconut flour very well. Coconut flour is such thirsty stuff, you can end up with a crumbly too-dry mess without much effort. Glucomannan holds some absurdly high multiple of its own weight in liquid. I have a part almond flour, part coconut flour ‘cornbread’ in my queue of experiments. Will of course have to make a pot of chili to help wash it down. 🤓
 

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“A still more glorious dawn awaits. Not a sunrise, but a galaxy rise. A morning filled with 400 billion suns. The rising of the milky way.”

 Carl Sagan, Cosmos

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