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Waffle Makers


Marmish
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I searched and searched and found this place (see below) but in the meantime, my mother finally relinquished her grasp on the wafflemaker she got as a wedding present in the 1940's. I am in heaven 4 square waffles from an uncoated surface.

They sell and repair vintage toasters and waffle irons.

http://www.toaster.org/museum.html

Edited by Kayakado (log)
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My mother had a great waffle iron that made 4 square waffles, and it also had flat surface plates that she'd use to make excellent grilled cheese sandwiches. I wish I still had it.........................

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I have not one, but two Black and Decker square four-waffle makers, with the grids that flip over to be a flat griddle. My parents had the first one for a long time. When I moved into my first apartment junior year of college, my parents bought me one of my own. And last summer, my parents moved to Colorado where they already had a waffle iron and gave me theirs. It's great to have two, especially when faced with a crowd of a dozen hungry college students on a Saturday morning!

MelissaH

MelissaH

Oswego, NY

Chemist, writer, hired gun

Say this five times fast: "A big blue bucket of blue blueberries."

foodblog1 | kitchen reno | foodblog2

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  • 6 months later...

So, my housemate's 20+-year-old waffle maker is finally reaching the end of its life. She'd like to find a Belgian Waffle maker that ideally makes four or so waffles at a time. Any suggestions/recommendations?

Sincerely,

Dante

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Basically the higher the wattage, the thicker the waffle web. Without a commercial model you just can't get a thick waffle. I purchased a Kitchenaid Pro-Line and while it makes a thicker waffle than the cheaper models, it still does not compete with a commercial model.-Dick

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I love my Waring Pro (model #WWM200PC). It was either $39 or $49 at Costco. It makes about an 8" round waffle divided into fourths.

It's one that you pour the batter, close it and flip it over. The waffles come out light, never heavy. A beeper sounds when they are done. It has a darkness knob with several different settings. Plus you can leave it in longer if you like them super extra dark as my dad does.

If you use Marion Cunningham's (Fanny Farmer Cookbook) yeast waffle recipe you're in for a real treat....you just have to start them the night before.

You can find the recipe on line too.

Edited by Susie Q (log)
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  • 1 month later...

I have the Chef's Choice Waffle Pro. It just stopped working after about 10 batches. Other than that I love it!! :-(

I've also heard the Waring is the way to go.

I thoroughly disapprove of duels...If a man should challenge me, I would take him kindly and forgivingly by the hand and lead him to a quiet retired spot...and kill him. ~Mark Twain

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I love my Waring Pro (model #WWM200PC). It was either $39 or $49 at Costco. It makes about an 8" round waffle divided into fourths.

How long does the Waring Pro take to bake a waffle? And does it need to warm-up again between waffles?

Thanks.

Baker of "impaired" cakes...
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We got a Waring Pro a couple months ago and absolutely love it. The waffles come out perfectly cooked and light, with a crispy exterior. I've never paid attention to how long it takes, but it isn'tlong--a couple of minutes. It definitely does not need to warm up in between uses. I take one out, pour in another measure of batter, and start it right up. I have done 6 or 7 in a row this way in a relatively short period of time.

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We bought a VillaWare Belgian Wafflemaker a few months ago and have been very happy with it. In fact we like it so much that we've even bought one for a friend.

At first I used a Belgian waffle mix but after I found the Amazing Overnight Waffle recipe in The 150 Best American Recipes I was converted. It's also a yeasted recipe (very fast & easy) and makes the best waffles we've ever had. They also freeze well.

I'm getting hungry just thinking about them. Mmmm... a hot crisp waffle topped with blueberries & maple syrup..... it just doesn't get better than that.

pat

I would live all my life in nonchalance and insouciance

Were it not for making a living, which is rather a nouciance.

-- Ogden Nash

http://bluestembooks.com/

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I love my Waring Pro (model #WWM200PC). It was either $39 or $49 at Costco. It makes about an 8" round waffle divided into fourths.

How long does the Waring Pro take to bake a waffle? And does it need to warm-up again between waffles?

Thanks.

There is a light that comes on when the iron is ready to make another one. And it's back on by the time I lift one waffle out and am ready to pour another.

Some other notes. It's easier and cleaner to use Pam instead of a brush on the grids. The clear batter measuring cup has a black fill line on the outside that will wear off. Before the line wore totally off, I just scored mine with a knife and it works fine. The unit cleans up very easily.

Edited by Susie Q (log)
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You're welcome. I think you will like it.

Also, do try the Fanny Farmer yeast waffles. They are my favorite. The batter goes together easily the night before. In the morning you beat in the eggs (you can do that too the night before, just put it in the icebox) and beat in the soda and go to it. If you like a sweeter waffle add a tablespoon of sugar.

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You're welcome.  I think you will like it.

Also, do try the Fanny Farmer yeast waffles.  They are my favorite.  The batter goes  together easily the night before. In the morning you beat in the eggs (you can do that too the night before, just put it in the icebox) and beat in the soda and go to it. If you like a sweeter waffle add a tablespoon of sugar.

I prefer the Cook's Illustrated technique modification for overnight waffles, noted by Susie Q: put the batter together the night before, but beat the eggs in. Leave the batter to rise overnight in the fridge. No need for baking soda, because the colder temperature reduces the amount of acid produced. I find I prefer the Fanny Farmer recipe to the Cook's Illustrated recipe, but I like the fridge technique because it makes the morning easier, and I find the flavor better.

MelissaH

MelissaH

Oswego, NY

Chemist, writer, hired gun

Say this five times fast: "A big blue bucket of blue blueberries."

foodblog1 | kitchen reno | foodblog2

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  • 7 months later...

I had an old steel waffle iron but it stuck sometimes and my mother gave me a new one with plastic plates. Unfortunately I threw out the old iron when I received the gift. Then I discovered the new one sticks terribly. I have thrown it out too. We haven't had a waffle at home in a couple of years, but are starting to hanker after one, especially with pecans on top.

Can anyone recommend a waffle iron that doesn't stick to the waffle and tear it to shreds when you try to harvest it?

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This might belong in a different forum, but:

I have a Vitantonio that I like. I got it quite awhile ago after reading a good review in Cooks Illustrated or somewhere like that.

Maybe a little more fat in the recipe would decrease the sticking?

Ahh, October, time for the waffle harvest. Fields of waffles slowly turning golden...

Edited by pastrygirl (log)
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This might belong in a different forum, but:

I have a Vitantonio that I like.  I got it quite awhile ago after reading a good review in Cooks Illustrated or somewhere like that. 

Maybe a little more fat in the recipe would decrease the sticking?

Ahh, October, time for the waffle harvest.  Fields of waffles slowly turning golden...

Is that near the spaghetti trees? :biggrin:

"Fat is money." (Per a cracklings maker shown on Dirty Jobs.)
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  • 10 months later...

I was a flippable waffle maker at costco yesterday. I'm assuming you put the batter in and your suppose to spin or turn it 180 on it horizontal access. Does this design have significant improvement on cooking or clearning?

I am in the market for a new waffle maker. The one I have is a non-stick one but it sticks alot and requires a lot of oil.

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I have a kitchenaid waffle maker. It has waffle irons on both sides, so you pour batter in one side, flip, and pour batter in the other side, then flip back over.

I've never had any trouble cleaning the non stick interior and waffles don't stick to it. Plus I can make two batches at once. I believe the idea of the flippable machine is that when you flip it, the batter distributes evenly over the plates.

Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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I'll second the Kitchenaid.

I have the Pro-Line and it works like a charm. Waffle web thickness is related to the heat the maker puts out in watts. Less watts, smaller and thinner waffles. The Kitchenaid makes good sized waffles but not like a Pro machine.-Dick

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The one they're selling at Costco is the non-commercial version of this waffle maker.

Costco is $60, commercial is $260.

It also looks like the Costco version has been discontinued by Waring. The few places I've looked say it's not dependable, which is odd for Waring. Their commercial products are very well built, I don't know about the consumer versions.

Fooey's Flickr Food Fotography

Brünnhilde, so help me, if you don't get out of the oven and empty the dishwasher, you won't be allowed anywhere near the table when we're flambeéing the Cherries Jubilee.

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I don't like the modern tall 'Belgian' style waffles, so, I use a couple of vintage waffle irons that I re-wired. I have a large round Edison that belonged to my grandmother, but I prefer to use my Sunbeam duo brunch model that makes two six inch waffles at once. Both irons have built in thermometers.

There are some really great old commercial models as well. -Made back during a time when these things were expected to last through several lifetimes.

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I just spent 15 minutes trying to figure out the difference between the Costco version and the commercial, and I came up trumps.

Costco changes to model numbers, so it's impossible to comparison shop. That's the main reason I never buy hardware at Costco, at least nothing that's cheap enough not to be disposable.

After looking at reviews on about 10 sites, there are enough people saying "mine broke" or "waiting weeks for repair" that I'd avoid this version.

I wouldn't avoid Waring's commercial version, as I have three pieces of their commercial hardware in my home kitchen and they are rock solid.

Edited by fooey (log)

Fooey's Flickr Food Fotography

Brünnhilde, so help me, if you don't get out of the oven and empty the dishwasher, you won't be allowed anywhere near the table when we're flambeéing the Cherries Jubilee.

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I just spent 15 minutes trying to figure out the difference between the Costco version and the commercial, and I came up trumps.

Just looking at the pictures, it looks like the costco version has more plastic parts, and the commercial version has more steel parts.

"I think it's a matter of principle that one should always try to avoid eating one's friends."--Doctor Dolittle

blog: The Institute for Impure Science

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I have that red Foreman grill with interchangeable inserts, two are for waffles. Works quite well and gives me a handy grill and hotplate (or what a flat top grill is called) at the same time. All non stick, I think I spend $70 on it. Makes nice panini, sometimes I make bacon on it (it tilts and the grease drips into a long narrow plastic pan you place underneath) etc. I usually don't like these 7 tools in one things, but I'm quite happy with this one. You need to let it heat up for a while, but then it works great.

What it does not offer, is that indicator that your waffles are done, green light or something. I never missed that though.

"And don't forget music - music in the kitchen is an essential ingredient!"

- Thomas Keller

Diablo Kitchen, my food blog

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