Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

Sign in to follow this  
CaliPoutine

Baking bread with convection.

Recommended Posts

We have a brand new oven. A GE profile, dual fuel with convection. I baked some cookies with the convection feature and they came out great. I was hesitant to bake a loaf of bread using the convection feature though. I'm not sure why, I thought it might deflate it or dry it out.

What do you think? Yes or No?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

depends on what kind of bread you're baking. if you're baking a lean dough that requires steam, i wouldn't use the convection feature. enriched breads like brioche, challah and the like are okay to bake using convection.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've been baking bread in a convection oven since the earliest ones came on the market.

I reduce the temp 25 degrees F and when preparing a new type, watch to see how fast it bakes, some take significantly less time than a convectional oven.

To make sure, I use an instant read thermometer to be sure the interior temp is 190 degrees F for a regular pan loaf of white or whole wheat, 200 degrees for French, Italian or rustic "artisan" type breads baked on a stone.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Plenty of commercial bakery ovens use convection.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I've been baking bread in a convection oven since the earliest ones came on the market. 

I reduce the temp 25 degrees F and when preparing a new type, watch to see how fast it bakes, some take significantly less time than a convectional oven.

To make sure, I use an instant read thermometer to be sure the interior temp is 190 degrees F for a regular pan loaf of white or whole wheat, 200 degrees for French, Italian or rustic "artisan" type breads baked on a stone.

My new oven automatically reduces the temp by 25F if I use the convection feature. I made a honey oat sandwich loaf( KA flour whole grain baking). I used the regular oven and it came out fine. Next time I'll try the convection.

Is there a benefit to using the convection feature?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My new oven automatically reduces the temp by 25F if I use the convection feature.    I made a honey oat sandwich loaf( KA flour whole grain baking).  I used the regular oven and it came out fine.  Next time I'll try the convection.

Is there a benefit to using the convection feature?

A convection oven circulates the air, allowing more hot air to come into contact with the food. More contact = quicker cooking at the same temperature as a non-convection oven. It also means a nicer crust on whatever you're cooking (usually a good thing, bad for some things though).

For bread, convection is definitely nice. For cookies, again, convection rules. For say, creme brulee, you want the convection off. Roasting meats, convection is great since you get a nice searing effect on the outside of the meat.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Convection ovens work fine for bread, but if you do not have steam injection you might want to turn the convection off for the first few minutes of the bake to let the steam gelatanise the surface to give you a better crust.

Alternatively bake inside a large heavy pre-heated casserole, like a le Crueset. Remove the lid after 10 minutes

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You only need steam in the first few minutes.

At the end of the bake you want dry heat to crisp the crust.

The dough (which is about a third water) will also release steam, and if the oven is a closed box like a casserole (most are not) will be enough.

You can put a cast iron pan to preheat, and throw a mugful of water into it to give a burst of superheated steam (care!) when you put the dough in, but the fan in a convection oven will blow it away, unless turned off.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My experience with our new convection oven has been that it takes a little trial and error to figure out what temperature and for how long anything will bake!

With bread, the biggest trouble I was having for a while was that the tops browned too much before the loaves were baked all the way through. To be fair, the only change I was making was to decrease the temperature 25° and the baking time by roughly 30%... but when I made my "everyday bread" (which I bake in heavy commercial Pullman pans, sans the tops,) the loaves kept coming out nearly burned on top and all doughy in the middle.

After much trial and error, I found that I had to decrease the temperature by an *additional* 25°F (down to 400° from 450°F) and the loaves come out perfect in about 15-18 minutes (rather than the original 20-25.)

You probably know this (although I was ignorant of the facts before I got my oven and started doing some research,) but there are two kinds of convection ovens widely available for home use... some have the normal two elements and a fan to circulate the air already heated in the oven. Others (like mine) have a third element behind the circulating fan, so the oven is actually blowing *heated* air around. I'm not sure if this has something to do with why I have drop the temperature twice what is recommended for most ovens & converted recipes... but I'll bet someone around here could provide some insight!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

  • Similar Content

    • By KennethT
      Is there a discussion in the book about the purpose of adding ascorbic acid?  I just saw the contest #2 in which the recipe called for it.  I'm curious because a woman I know on the internet used to work in a bakery in Vietnam, and said that to get similar results to the banh mi there, you need to add ascorbic acid.  Does it act as a gluten relaxer?  Traditional banh mi have a very tender and crisp crust, and a very light and tender, relatively closed crumb.
    • By Kasia
      A SANDWICH TO GO
       
      Today I would like to share with you the recipe for a snack which you can grab and eat "on the go". I know that it is unhealthy. We should celebrate eating and eat calmly and with deliberation. However, sometimes the day is too short for everything on our schedule and we still have to eat. Admittedly, we can sin and go for some fast food, but it is healthier and tastier to prepare something quickly in our own kitchen.

      Today, Camembert cheese and cranberries in a fresh, crunchy roll take the lead role. It sounds easy and yummy, doesn't it? Try it and get on with your day . Today I used a homemade cranberry preserve which was left over from dessert, but if you like you can buy your own.

      Ingredients:
      2 fresh rolls (your favourite ones)
      150g of camembert cheese
      1 handful of lettuce
      2 teaspoons of butter
      2 teaspoons of pine nuts or sunflower seeds
      preserve
      100g of fresh cranberries
      3 tablespoons of brown sugar
      100ml of apple juice

      Wash the cranberries. Put the cranberries, sugar and apple juice into a pan with a heavy bottom and boil with the lid on for 10-12 minutes, stirring from time to time. Try it and if necessary add some sugar. Leave to cool down. Cut the rolls in half and spread with the butter. Put some lettuce on one half of the roll. Slice the camembert cheese and arrange it on the lettuce. Put a fair portion of the cranberry preserve on top of the cheese. Sprinkle with the roast pine nuts or sunflower seeds and cover with the second half of the roll.

      Enjoy your meal!

    • By Dave the Cook
      Modernist Bread is out now, but maybe you haven't taken the plunge. Here's your chance to win your own copy, courtesy of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Cooking Lab has provided us with a couple of other prizes that will go to a second and third winner: second place will win an autographed poster and calendar, and third place will receive an autographed poster. They are also providing an autographed bookplate for the first place winner's copy of Modernist Bread. The rules are simple: we are going to post recipes from the book that the team at The Cooking Lab has graciously provided for this purpose. To enter into the contest, you need to bake one or more of these recipes and post about them in the official contest topics by the end of November 2017. Winners will be drawn at random from those posting pictures and descriptions of their completed loaves. Complete rules and other details can be found here.
       
      For part two, we're featuring another cornerstone recipe from the book: Direct Country-Style Bread. The only leavener here is instant yeast, so production time is considerably shortened. The relative lack of flavor compared to long-proofed doughs is offset by the use of whole grains. Courtesy of The Cooking Lab, here's that recipe (extracted from the book and reformatted for purposes of this contest):
       




    • By Raamo
      HOST'S NOTE: This post and those that follow were split off from the pre-release discussion of Modernist Bread.
      *****
       
      Figured I don't need to dump all this into the contest thread - so I'll post here.  My journey to making my first MC loaf.
       
      Her's the poolish after >12 hours:

       
       
      Not pictured - water with yeast in it below the bread flour and poolish

       
      That went into the mixer and not long later I had a shaggy mass:
       

       
      That rested for a while - then mixed until medium gluten formation - a window pane that was both opaque and translucent (no picture for that slightly messy part)
       
      Folded and rested, folded and rested, I think this is 1/2 the mass now ready to rest one final time.
       

       
      Proofed it in the oven - I have a picture of that but it's just foggy window oven
       
      Then it went into the oven, here it is at max temp - 450 with steam turned on.
       

       
      Completed loaf:
       
      \
       
      And the crumb - this is awesome bread:

       
    • By Chris Hennes
      Next week marks the official release of the highly-anticipated Modernist Bread by Nathan Myhrvold and Francisco Migoya. The eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters is excited to provide you with the opportunity to win a copy of the book. The Cooking Lab has provided us with a couple of other prizes that will go to a second and third winner: second place will win an autographed poster and calendar, and third place will receive an autographed poster. They are also providing an autographed bookplate for the first place winner's copy of Modernist Bread. The rules are simple: we are going to post recipes from the book that the team at The Cooking Lab has graciously provided for this purpose. To enter into the contest, you need to bake one or more of these recipes and post about them in the official contest topics by the end of November 2017. Winners will be drawn at random from those posting pictures and descriptions of their completed loaves. Complete rules and other details can be found here.
       
      For our first recipe, we're starting with a cornerstone recipe from the book: French Lean Bread. I've personally made this one and it's both delicious and completely approachable by anyone with an interest in this book. Courtesy of The Cooking Lab, here's that recipe (extracted from the book and reformatted for purposes of this contest):
       





       
      The recipes in this book tend to rely on information presented more extensively earlier in the books, so if anything isn't clear enough here please ask and Dave and I will do our best to answer your questions (we've had early digital access to the books for the last month or so).
       
      ETA: Here's what my first go at the recipe sounded like coming out of the oven...
       
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×