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IMO it doesn't really matter how it's cooked as long as it's eaten cold-which how it tasts best. :wub:

I totally agree with you. I always cook an extra piece or two for the next day. Wonder what it is about the salmon that makes it so. For what it's worth I find that halibut has the same quality.

You shouldn't eat grouse and woodcock, venison, a quail and dove pate, abalone and oysters, caviar, calf sweetbreads, kidneys, liver, and ducks all during the same week with several cases of wine. That's a health tip.

Jim Harrison from "Off to the Side"

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I do an easy marinade- soy sauce, french dijon mustard, chopped green scallions, garlic clove sliced thin (goodfellas style  :wink:  )

I either broil or grill it and I add sesame seeds at the top.

My husband loves it, but I am loving this thread, cuz salmon is one of my quick fixes and we like this verison so much, but I am bored of it as I make it too much since it takes no time at all.

I could not figure out how to edit my post :rolleyes: but I found a pic of my salmon so here it is:

gallery_46516_3268_211356.jpg

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Prep the fillets with a 90/9/1 % salt/demarara/rum(single malt :biggrin: ) rub for 2-4 hrs then pat off excess and rinse, dry foe 2-4 hrs & cold smoke for 24 hrs until it has a golden hue.

Then it`s simply lightly toasted wholemeal bread and cucumber with the slivers of salmon.........oh go on a dash of lemon and dill if you insist.

:biggrin:

"It's true I crept the boards in my youth, but I never had it in my blood, and that's what so essential isn't it? The theatrical zeal in the veins. Alas, I have little more than vintage wine and memories." - Montague Withnail.

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Last night we made dinner for six and I broiled salmon lightly oiled, S&P-ed, dusted with orange zest and then topped with a sauce that follows:

Take the zest and juice of four blood oranges, reduce awhile in a pan, then add equal amount of heavy cream and a splash of chicken stock, salt, pepper, tiny pinch of red pepper flakes and some cumin. Reduce again, then mount with butter at the end.

I served salmon over quinoa, then topped with sauce. It was perfect.

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My first post here...

Peanut and garlic stuffed salmon... My own creation.

Crush some raw peanuts then lightly brown in a pan w/ olive oil and some garlic. Set aside.

I used a salmon filet and sliced it as if to butterfly it .

With the filet closed dip in egg (w/ salt and pepper) and then bread crumbs. Then drop it into a hot pan with a bit of olive oil. After it's browned on one side, flip it, open the filet and place inside the peanuts/garlic mixture. close the filet. When this side is browned lower the heat, cover and simmer til done.

Fantastic just like this, but I want to try making a light, white wine cream and garlic sauce for this . I may also try it with cashews...

Good luck

This space for rent.
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  • 1 year later...

All this talk of trouble with the wild salmon fishery out west was starting to depress me . . . until I remembered I had some in the freezer!

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And then I remembered this thread from a year ago - time for a bump.

Fresh fish is always better than frozen, but when a good size wild salmon can be had for three or four bucks it's worth it. This one was exactly one kilogram, as in one thousand grams - weird. At least it makes the yield calculation easy: after poaching I got 645 grams of meat, or 65%. That's not too bad - under half means a scrawny fish and/or a sloppy chef.

This thread asks for favorite everyday methods for eating salmon. I'd say we try to have salmon almost once a week, and I wanted something new for this one. The frozen fish went straight into the poacher (barely fit) and cooked through. This part is not new for me, I find it makes very little difference if thawn out first. The poaching liquid is reserved for chowder as usual, but this time I went for a salmon loaf.

Loaf may not sound as elegant as mousse or souffle but I had no cream and was looking for something a bit more virtuous. I found a recipe in The Dietitians of Canada Cookbook that was low fat and included things like oatmeal and lemon juice, so what the hell. Plus I had a never-used copper aspic mold in the shape of a fish:

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The loaf was okay - I'd give it a 6.5 out of 10. It needed a little something . . . like a brick of lard and a tablespoon of salt.

It was served up luncheon style in thin slices with pickled eggs and cukes, and a mustard mayo sauce. I'd do it again without the mold, although I think such things are due for a comeback.

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Peter Gamble aka "Peter the eater"

I just made a cornish game hen with chestnut stuffing. . .

Would you believe a pigeon stuffed with spam? . . .

Would you believe a rat filled with cough drops?

Moe Sizlack

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I posted this on a similar thread, but bbq salmon is killer. Even fish haters will eat it. Just brush on your fave bbq sauce and grill or broil to doneness. Salmon takes to bbq incredibly well.

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Tonight I'll be doing something sorta similar to a BBQ sauce- I use tamarind/date chutney (which has a nice deep fruity-ish flavor) and add some lime juice and cayenne. My usual technique with salmon is to start it in a hot pan and finish under the broiler- the 'glaze' goes on just during the last 30 seconds or so (I'll use the '8 minutes per inch' rule to estimate how long it will take, but still be sure to rest it with a small metal skewer just to make sure). This is with a fillet, so the skin gets nice and crispy. I have a whole lot of cilantro in the house, so that will be a garnish tonight, but it's not something I'll go out of my way for if I don't have it.

Last week I kept it much simpler than that (I don't like to get too crazy with salmon)- just a dusting of salt and coriander/cumin masala, squeeze of lemon at the end. We try to eat salmon at least once per week- the best overall is probably in the summer months when I do it on the grill with some wood smoke, but that is when I will get the steaks. For the fillets you just can't beat the crispy skin when it is pan roasted.

aka Michael

Chi mangia bene, vive bene!

"...And bring us the finest food you've got, stuffed with the second finest."

"Excellent, sir. Lobster stuffed with tacos."

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Loaf may not sound as elegant as mousse or souffle but I had no cream and was looking for something a bit more virtuous. I found a recipe in The Dietitians of Canada Cookbook that was low fat and included things like oatmeal and lemon juice, so what the hell. Plus I had a never-used copper aspic mold in the shape of a fish:

The loaf was okay - I'd give it a 6.5 out of 10. It needed a little something . . . like a brick of lard and a tablespoon of salt.

It was served up luncheon style in thin slices with pickled eggs and cukes, and a mustard mayo sauce. I'd do it again without the mold, although I think such things are due for a comeback.

I grew up in NH and salmon loaf (a/k/a salmon pie) was a very popular item on diner menus. (The diners that looked like old railroad dining cars). It was usually served with a white sauce (bechamel) spooned on top and sides of mashed potatoes and green peas. Mmmm. I haven't made salmon loaf in years, but I'll definitely be making it tonight. Yours looks yummy. Thanks for reminding me!

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my favorite "everyday" salmon is boneless fresh filets dipped in spicy panko crumbs deep fried and then eaten with homemade tartar sauce

why am I always at the bottom and why is everything so high? 

why must there be so little me and so much sky?

Piglet 

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I put together a French dressing (lemon juice, olive oil, garlic paste, Frank's Hot Sauce, horseradish, cayenne, paprika, and S & P) and marinate a nice thick salmon filet in that while I put together a salad. I preheat a cast iron pan in a smokin' hot oven, lay the salmon skin side down and roast until it's just done. I usually add some crumbled blue cheese to the dressing for the salad. Big favorite around here.

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my favorite "everyday"  salmon is boneless fresh filets dipped in spicy panko crumbs deep fried and then eaten with homemade  tartar sauce

That sounds very good - and I'm sure it is - but whenever I try to shallow or deep fry salmon I get less than perfect results: the flesh gets brown and hard. Maybe a panko crust or some kind of thicker batter is the answer. If the fish can be cooked without coming into direct contact with the hot oil then maybe it will remain pink and juicy. Hmmm . . . I have work to do.

By the way hummingbirdkiss, what goes into your tartar sauce for salmon? Anything from that cool garden of yours? (I just peeked at the Flickr photostream)

Peter Gamble aka "Peter the eater"

I just made a cornish game hen with chestnut stuffing. . .

Would you believe a pigeon stuffed with spam? . . .

Would you believe a rat filled with cough drops?

Moe Sizlack

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I agree most salmon battered and fried sucks but panko cooks crispy so fast that it is just perfect ..use a nice thick filet and hot hot oil get them in crispy and out ..then eat them right away ...I love it this way ..panko done like it says on the package makes a nice shell so it protects the fish from the oil

Thank you so much Peter the Eater that garden is my haven in life! I am going to add more pictures tomorrow as it has just burst the past few days :wub: I have dreams of this place a person could just get lost in wandering around ...there is so much work to do ..but I digress completely off topic .....

to answer yes I add lots of garden herbs to my tartar sauce ..

this recipe is pretty much exactly what I do but since I never do it exactly the same I found this to be close so you could try it if you like

http://www.foodnetwork.com/food/recipes/re...6_15984,00.html

my changes are I double the amount for sure ..I love it on everything ..

use half sour cream(or Greek yogurt) and half mayo

it is nice because the sauce can morph with the season depending on the herbs available ...

when tarragon comes in to the garden I will use it..or dill ..right now I have tons of parsley chives and fresh thyme (they are all going crazy out there!) so that is what I am using for this sauce

and I like lots of fresh cracked pepper in it

I know folks dont jump on fried salmon but the panko works I promise! as I said just get it in and out of the hot oil fast!

hope you like it!

Edited by hummingbirdkiss (log)
why am I always at the bottom and why is everything so high? 

why must there be so little me and so much sky?

Piglet 

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I think the fried salmon gets an ugh from many people due to the abysmal Friday "croquettes" served if you lived up North and/or went to a Catholic school.

They were awful. :wacko:

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I also cook mine in parchment, and enclose some citrus so as not to have the heavy salmon smell that seems to permeate the house for days after I cook salmon.  I have been using the "organic" Scottish salmon (though there's some controversy over their use of "Organic", the farming methods are organic though there's no such certification, and the salmon itself is extra-exquisite!)

I top the pieces with fresh tarragon, top that with slices of orange, and bake.  It's delicious.  Here's one that I fancied up a bit in plating so I could photograph it:

gallery_11181_3820_72476.jpg

Whats the Pecan item on the right ?? looks great .

" No, Starvin' Marvin ! Thats MY turkey pot pie "

- Cartman

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  • 4 weeks later...

Salmon steaks soaked in maple syrup and soy sauce, wrapped in hardwood veneer and then barbecued:

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Peter Gamble aka "Peter the eater"

I just made a cornish game hen with chestnut stuffing. . .

Would you believe a pigeon stuffed with spam? . . .

Would you believe a rat filled with cough drops?

Moe Sizlack

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Wow, Peter, that looks AMAZING. Were do you get hardwood veneer from? Plus, cooking time and temp of grill/coals estimated for just cooked through salmon?

I got a pile of cherry veneer from Lee Valley at the clearance table, not thinking of culinary uses at the time. This stores sells woodworking tools, gardening stuff, etc.

I cooked the fish on a small Weber gas grill for 12 minutes on medium/high. I rolled the bundles over mid way - you can tell how the salmon is doing by looking into the open ends. The salmon gets sort of steamed/roasted inside while the ends go dark and crunchy. The wood smoke flavor is mild and the maple adds sweet chewiness. Easy clean up, too.

Peter Gamble aka "Peter the eater"

I just made a cornish game hen with chestnut stuffing. . .

Would you believe a pigeon stuffed with spam? . . .

Would you believe a rat filled with cough drops?

Moe Sizlack

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What a clever idea, Peter! Something like a cross between planking salmon (which I love) and parchment cooking- and it's gotta be cheaper than buying those cedar planks. I'll have to keep my eyes open for appropriate veneers, and give this a try.

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