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Tomato Chutney


Suvir Saran
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Yes, I'd forgotten how much. I used to can a lot of food as a newlywed, but had gotten away from it as kids, job, etc. became more time-consuming. I see more canning in my future.......

Stop Family Violence

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Thanks again. :smile:

I also noticed you are using an electric stove.  You seem to be a pro at it... Since you made a great tarte tatin using it.. and of course with the help of the oven...

I have always found them more difficult.. and but after a few days.. I get a hang of them.. and then it is time to leave the home where I am getting used to them.. and back to mine.

Do you find them a challenge?

And yes those whole chiles are great.  I love them in this chutney.  They add that layer of smoky flavor that is most wonderful in the chutney.

I've been cooking on electric stoves for years Suvir (since all apartements in Houston seem to only have electric installed). So I am a Pro at them :smile:. However, I much rather using the gas stoves and I made sure we have a gas stove when we move to our new home early next year.

On another note Dana mentioned that her jars sealed almost as soon as she took them out of the water (Congrats on a successful canning session). Mine though did not seal (the lid not popping in and out) until they were fully cooled. I wonder what I am doing different. Dana, did u use a canning pot and racks? I just used a deep roaster on two burners.

FM

E. Nassar
Houston, TX

My Blog
contact: enassar(AT)gmail(DOT)com

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HAPPYLOG: (happy Epilog)

Just came back from the Indian shop (and restaurant) called Maharaja. they were kind enough to sell me all the spices and products my supermarket lacked, and after a while of talking about food, cooking and the great recipe I got from a "Master Chef" from India (I hope I haven't underestimated you) the man over the counter went to the kitchen and brought me a little bag with small green leaves with a very distinct aroma (naturally different from "curry" the powder).

Thanks, Suvir for your help and willingness to get the leaves over the ocean.

I'll report after completing the chutney.

"Eat every meal as if it's your first and last on earth" (Conrad Rosenblatt 1935)

http://foodha.blogli.co.il/

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Yes, I was able to get the curry powder in, and the chutney is terrific. Just the right amout of chile-not too hot and and wimpy, either. I mixed some with mayo and dipped some shrimp into it , then served it with some roasted caluiflower for our dinner. SUPER. I've already given 3 jars away, (I got 12 half pint jars), and I'm sure I'll have to make more this next weekend, as I won't have any left after I brag about it at work!!!

NO canning pot or racks--just a stock pot (had to do it in two batches). I'm at near sea level here. Does altitude have any thing to do with it? In my previous canning experience, I never had anything seal that quickly. I have canned green beans, pickles, fruits, in the past.

Stop Family Violence

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Some batches I've made have 'pinged' immediately; others took up to 1/2 hour.  Not sure what the variable is; possibly the degree to which the jars are filled?

I have the same experience as Her Majesty The Empress of Chutney.

Some batches of chutneys and jams ping very quickly, others late. Even amongst one batch, pings take place at differnt times. :shock:

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HAPPYLOG: (happy Epilog)

Just came back from the Indian shop (and restaurant) called Maharaja. they were kind enough to sell me all the spices and products my supermarket lacked, and after a while of talking about food, cooking and the great recipe I got from a "Master Chef" from India (I hope I haven't underestimated you) the man over the counter went to the kitchen and brought me a little bag with small green leaves with a very distinct aroma (naturally different from "curry" the powder).

Thanks, Suvir for your help and willingness to get the leaves over the ocean.

I'll report after completing the chutney.

I am so happy you found the leaves. I was sad that you were not in the US, where I could have easily FedEx'd you a package with Curry Leaves.

"Master Chef" - I thank you for fanning my ego. You are most kind. Flattery will get you everywhere. Even bags of curry leaves from the US. Maybe Maharaja's chef or management can tell you about their source for curry leaves.

Looking forward to hearing about your chutney experience. All the best. :smile:

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Yes, I was able to get the curry powder in, and the chutney is terrific. Just the right amout of chile-not too hot and and wimpy, either.  I mixed some with mayo and dipped some shrimp into it , then served it with some roasted caluiflower for our dinner. SUPER. I've already given 3 jars away, (I got 12 half pint jars), and I'm sure I'll have to make more this next weekend, as I won't have any left after I brag about it at work!!!

NO canning pot or racks--just a stock pot (had to do it in two batches). I'm at near sea level here. Does altitude have any thing to do with it? In my previous canning experience, I never had anything seal that quickly. I have canned green beans, pickles, fruits, in the past.

Glad you read the post in time. I was worried.

You are rather generous I see. Given 3 jars away already? Wow! Good for your friends.... I tend to give them away very easily... It is a little nothing, really, and yet a special treat for those that get it. A perfect gift for most any occasion. And made by you, and that adds so much value to what could otherwise be as I said before, a little nothing.

I have no canning pots or racks either. I use like you, a simple stock pot or two or three. It adds to the fun I think. Keeps me having to work. :smile:

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Pinging times are all over the board, always, for me. I sometimes imagine it is the differential between the hot jar and the ambient room temps, but this is just idle musing. Some jars in a batch make nearly no audible ping, but get the press test to assure all is well.

Priscilla

Writer, cook, & c. ● #TacoFriday observant ●  Twitter    Instagram

 

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Pinging times are all over the board, always, for me.  I sometimes imagine it is the differential between the hot jar and the ambient room temps, but this is just idle musing.  Some jars in a batch make nearly no audible ping, but get the press test to assure all is well.

I always do the press test and also trying to break the seal gently. I remove the outer screw top and try pulling gently on the lid, if it does not detach, the seal is fine. That also gives me an opportunity to clean the lid and the bottle. But I do this only the morning after I made the chutney or jam.

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Pinging times are all over the board, always, for me.  I sometimes imagine it is the differential between the hot jar and the ambient room temps, but this is just idle musing.  Some jars in a batch make nearly no audible ping, but get the press test to assure all is well.

I always do the press test and also trying to break the seal gently. I remove the outer screw top and try pulling gently on the lid, if it does not detach, the seal is fine. That also gives me an opportunity to clean the lid and the bottle. But I do this only the morning after I made the chutney or jam.

Me too, Suvir. Whatever I've canned I let cool all night. Then next day remove the rings, re-check the seal, wash and dry before putting on labels.

OK guess I'm making some more chutney this week. Or, marmalade--winter citrus is very inspiring, and I was lax in this regard last year. I resolve to improve.

Priscilla

Writer, cook, & c. ● #TacoFriday observant ●  Twitter    Instagram

 

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OK guess I'm making some more chutney this week.  Or, marmalade--winter citrus is very inspiring, and I was lax in this regard last year.  I resolve to improve.

Or do both. :wink:

I cannot tell you how happy my friends are to get these jars of homemade chutneys and jams instead of other gifts around the year.

It takes little effort for sure, but also gives so much of you to those you want to share with.

And if you want to economiz in this downward economy, this is a great thing to do.... :hmmm:

A winning act in fact. Ensures a healthy, chemical free and delicious treat for all. :biggrin:

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Came out just fine. We'll try it at lunch tomorrow with rice and lamb chops and see how the family reacts to a certain degree of heat.

By the way my jars are used, clean, and sterilized glass jars. There is no seal, but I pored the (hot) chutney to the (hot) jars closed the lid and turned upside down to cool.

Will that do? Should it be kept in the fridge? And how long do you keep an open jar in the fridge?

(I guess very short while...)

"Eat every meal as if it's your first and last on earth" (Conrad Rosenblatt 1935)

http://foodha.blogli.co.il/

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Came out just fine. We'll try it at lunch tomorrow with rice and lamb chops and see how the family reacts to a certain degree of heat.

By the way my jars are used, clean, and sterilized glass jars. There is no seal, but I pored the (hot) chutney to the (hot) jars closed the lid and turned upside down to cool.

Will that do?  Should it be kept in the fridge? And how long do you keep an open jar in the fridge?

(I guess very short while...)

I have never canned jars like those you mention. I know my mother used to use them and with great success. But they added wax and stuff I have no idea about.

I have had opened jars of chutney last as long as several months in the refrigerator.

Canned jars can stay in the pantry at least a year.. and once you open them, you should refrigerate.

Looking forward to hearing your families comments. :smile:

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Well, it went very well, worth all the efforts.

Tasting started with a mayo-chutney- pastrami sandwich. Great.

At lunch, along with grilled lamb chops (with olive oil, baharat & sumac)

The Tomato Chutney came with Yogurt over Basmati rice (with raisins, cinnamon & mustard seeds). On another plate we had fresh Wild rocket leaf, rashad (garden cress) and some spring onion. (It was optional to "sprinkle" this greenery over the yogurt, an option most of us took).

The chutney was well received, even by the "no heat" wife. Eldest son (12) took second helpings.

We had a side dish of "Baladi" (local grown, especially in Arab villages) eggplant, grilled, peeled as a whole , served warm with yogurt, dressed with garlic, parsley, sea salt, black pepper, lemon and olive oil.

I had a glass of local Cabernet Sauvignon, Tzora, suited me and the food just fine.

Suvir, a question, May I translate your Chutney recipe to Hebrew for friends of mine in an Israeli Food forum (naturedly I'II credit you and eGullet). They were curios as to my immediate need of curry leaves

"Eat every meal as if it's your first and last on earth" (Conrad Rosenblatt 1935)

http://foodha.blogli.co.il/

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Suvir, a question, May I translate your Chutney recipe to Hebrew for friends of mine in an Israeli Food forum (naturedly I'II credit you and eGullet). They were curios as to my immediate need of curry leaves

It would be an honor. Many thanks!

Please do post a link. Maybe some of our users that can read Hebrew can enjoy the fruit of your efforts.

Crediting as you suggest {eGullet and I and the Queen of Chutney (CathyL), perhaps, for her belief in this recipe and all of you that tried it would be great} is just fine. Maybe some others will join us for great chats about food from amongst your friends. Would be very exciting. :smile:

This chutney thread has been most beautiful in my humble opinion. It has brought so many of us, from such diverse regions and places in life together. Amazing how something so simple can give us so much in common. An enjoyment of the simple pleasures.

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I enjoy your chutney a great deal, perhaps someday I will get lucky and get some of those jars that you are so generous with Suvir. :smile:

You make it yourself you said. :angry: Being lazy I see...

These jars are for the uninitiated. To share with them the simplicity of a chutney.

One like you, author of a great Indian cookbook, praised by our very own eGullet Indian food authority Simon Majumdar, hardly needs initiation.

I was thrilled to see Simons words on your book. How true and how timey for him to have made his post.

I hope others can get your book, cook a few recipes, and chat actively with you whilst you are on this forum as a guest.

And lucky are the three that shall win your book. They are in for a treat. :smile:

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I can make it, but the question is can I make it like Suvir.. ! I would love to taste your chutney. My grandmother says, each hand has its own magic.. and yours is different from mine.. so come one be generous.. one little jar!

I was thrilled to see Simon's post. I have a lot of respect for him and his words mean a great deal to me. Thank you as well for your kind words and encouragement

Monica Bhide

A Life of Spice

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I can make it, but the question is can I make it like Suvir.. ! I would love to taste your chutney. My grandmother says, each hand has its own magic.. and yours is different from mine.. so come one be generous.. one little jar!

I was thrilled to see Simon's post.  I have a lot of respect for him and his words mean a great deal to me. Thank you as well for your kind words and encouragement

I think Simon is just as smart as he is generous. So his words actually would gain even more weight.

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I can make it, but the question is can I make it like Suvir.. ! I would love to taste your chutney. My grandmother says, each hand has its own magic.. and yours is different from mine.. so come one be generous.. one little jar!

You said you make it.. And now you are saying you Can make it.... You are such a tease.

Send me a jar of yours.. and I shall send you a jar of mine.

We will do a taste test of that grandmas hand myth. There is actually a lot of truth to that old saying. :smile:

And I want to eat YOUR chutney. Why would I want you to make it like mine... It is special as yours .... and that is what will be enjoyed by me and others.... We would all get bored rather quickly if all we wanted were clones of one another.. and the same things... :rolleyes:

Edited by Suvir Saran (log)
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I can make it, but the question is can I make it like Suvir.. ! I would love to taste your chutney. My grandmother says, each hand has its own magic.. and yours is different from mine.. so come one be generous.. one little jar!

You said you make it.. And now you are saying you Can make it.... You are such a tease.

Send me a jar of yours.. and I shall send you a jar of mine.

We will do a taste test of that grandmas hand myth. There is actually a lot of truth to that old saying. :smile:

And I want to ear YOUR chutney. Why would I want you to make it like mine... It is special as yours .... and that is what will be enjoyed by me and others.... We would all get bored rather quickly if all we wanted were clones of one another.. and the same things... :rolleyes:

I make it and love it. I will surely send you mine and look forward to yours!!

Monica Bhide

A Life of Spice

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