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Tomato Chutney


Suvir Saran
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Foodman, I am back.  How did you like the chutney?  Is it made?  No problems I hope.

I did stop by the Indian grocery store and bought all the spices that I did not already have, then stopped by K-mart and bought some Mason jars. However I did not get a chance to go to the market to buy the tomatoes since it was out of the way and I had to pick up my wife so I will probably make it tomorrow and post as soon as I do. I do have one question though, Are the whole dried chillies necessary? Can I use crushed dried red chillies instead? I forgot to buy whole ones and I do have a jar of crushed chillies.

FM

E. Nassar
Houston, TX

My Blog
contact: enassar(AT)gmail(DOT)com

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Foodman, I am back.  How did you like the chutney?  Is it made?  No problems I hope.

I did stop by the Indian grocery store and bought all the spices that I did not already have, then stopped by K-mart and bought some Mason jars. However I did not get a chance to go to the market to buy the tomatoes since it was out of the way and I had to pick up my wife so I will probably make it tomorrow and post as soon as I do. I do have one question though, Are the whole dried chillies necessary? Can I use crushed dried red chillies instead? I forgot to buy whole ones and I do have a jar of crushed chillies.

FM

It should work. It may lend more heat into the chutney, but you seem to like things HOT.

The good part of the whole chilies is that you can fry them till they are almost a very darl brown, bordering on black, and after the slow cooking of the chutney, they easily break off and impart their wonderful toasty taste into it. I think you may be able to do this with the broken pieces as well. But be careful to not burn the seeds.

Looking forward to your tomato chutney experience May I trouble you for pics.. maybe even some of the steps involved? If it is not too much to ask for. Please. :smile:

Hope it lives up to your expectations.

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The chutney was done this afternoon. Sorry about the delay in postong but we had a christma s party to go to and my wife was pushing me out the door as soon as I finished canning. The chutney is indeed amazing!! It has a very complex and firey taste. The recipe yeilded 12 half pint jars plus some leftovers. Since we had to go I did not get a chance to taste except a couple of spoonfulls of this delicious sauce. The tomatoes were not as flavorful as I had hoped for so I followed The "chutney Queen's" suggestion and used a full 12oz can of tomato paste instead of six.

Here are the pictures,

The starting line-up

chutney1.jpg

The tomato puree

chutney3.jpg

Frying the spices

chutney2.jpg

The tomatoes are in

chutney4.jpg

The fully cooked chutney

chutney5.jpg

Pantry treasures

chutney6.jpg

Thanks for a fantastic new recipe Suvir, I will be doing this often.

FM

Edited by FoodMan (log)

E. Nassar
Houston, TX

My Blog
contact: enassar(AT)gmail(DOT)com

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As I mentioned before, I've never had tomato chutney before. The chutneys that I had were mainly a dipping sauce of some kind or a condiment and both were usually made with fruit and vinegar (apple, plum, cilantro, apricot or mango chutneys). However this one is more like an Indian "marinara" that can be used as a dipping sauce, condiment OR as a cooking sauce (sort of like a curry) and would taste fantastic any way . It also is not as acidic as the rest of the chutneys that I've had and until today I was under the impression that anything called a chutney has to be fruity and tangy. So here is my question, what is a chutney? what does the word mean? does it simply mean a sauce? I'm really curious to learn.

FM

E. Nassar
Houston, TX

My Blog
contact: enassar(AT)gmail(DOT)com

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As I mentioned before, I've never had tomato chutney before. The chutneys that I had were mainly a dipping sauce of some kind or a condiment and both were usually made with fruit and vinegar (apple, plum, cilantro, apricot or mango chutneys). However this one is more like an Indian "marinara" that can be used as a dipping sauce, condiment OR as a cooking sauce (sort of like a curry) and would taste fantastic any way . It also is not as acidic as the rest of the chutneys that I've had and until today I was under the impression that anything called a chutney has to be fruity and tangy. So here is my question, what is a chutney? what does the word mean? does it simply mean a sauce? I'm really curious to learn.

FM

Chutney would literally translate from Hindi as something that has been mashed into a paste.

If someone is bashing another, verbally or even physically, you will often hear another say that so and so made a chutney out of so and so.

We have had a thread on chutneys. I shall do a search and post it for you.

I am glad you enjoyed making it. Seems like you did a most splendid job with the chutney. The color is most beautiful. Thanks also for taking pictures. AMAZING! I owe you several more recipes. You are a very kind person to have made this effort. I cannot tell you how grateful I am. :smile:

I first made this chutney using winter tomatoes and a can of tomato paste. It was Divine and every bit as good as what I remembered it to be from my childhood. In fact for some reason, I have always enjoyed it better in the winter. Maybe the heat from the chutney is a perfect counter to the weather.

Your cans look beautiful. Maybe you can add some chutney into another condiment where it would add just enough of a kick to make it taste great but not too much to make it too spicy. That way, your wife can also taste some.

Keep us posted on your chutney experiences. Also, let us know about that pear chutney you were going to make. Of course that has its own thread.

Thanks for taking time to photograph. I am thrilled to see the pictures you took. Thanks! :smile:

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Chutney thread from before

The quote below is from the chutney thread above. Click on it for learning more about Chutneys and also to get more recipes.

"Chutneys are to Indian food what Salsas are to Mexican. Made from vegetables, fruits, dairy, grains and pulses, these are as diverse as the country itself. Each home has a favorite few and their own versions of those classics that are known throughout India.

When making chutneys in a food processor, make sure to use as little water as you possibly can. This makes the chutney taste more potent and rich in flavor. Often adding some sev, chivda or papri to the chutney is a good addition. These absorb the extra moisture and are also a great added flavor."

PS: Also, I must say you fried the chiles perfectly. I love how they are getting dark and yet have a little red in them. It is that darkness that adds a great warm toasty flavor. It makes all the difference.

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Thanks for the explanation about chutneys, they are more than just vinegary dips after all. I did enjoy cooking and taking pics of the chutney. So no problem at all in doing that. I do love to share my foods with everyone on the board. I guess you did notice I decided to buy some whole chillies after I read your earlier answer about them. They do give a great smoky flavor to the finished product and they do look darned good whole. We are going to another christmas party next Saturday at a friend's house, so he will be the first to recieve a jar of my chutney which I'm sure he will enjoy.

FM

E. Nassar
Houston, TX

My Blog
contact: enassar(AT)gmail(DOT)com

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Thanks for the explanation about chutneys, they are more than just vinegary dips after all. I did enjoy cooking  and taking pics of the chutney. So no problem at all in doing that. I do love to share my foods with everyone on the board. I guess you did notice I decided to buy some whole chillies after I read your earlier answer about them. They do give a great smoky flavor to the finished product and they do look darned good whole. We are going to another christmas party next Saturday at a friend's house, so he will be the first to recieve a jar of my chutney which I'm sure he will enjoy.

FM

Thanks again. :smile:

I also noticed you are using an electric stove. You seem to be a pro at it... Since you made a great tarte tatin using it.. and of course with the help of the oven...

I have always found them more difficult.. and but after a few days.. I get a hang of them.. and then it is time to leave the home where I am getting used to them.. and back to mine.

Do you find them a challenge?

And yes those whole chiles are great. I love them in this chutney. They add that layer of smoky flavor that is most wonderful in the chutney.

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Hi Suvir,

This Chutney made me want to join the heat almost from the start (of the thread). I located almost all the ingredients in our little Mid-East corner, but I'm afraid the fresh curry leaves are out at the moment. what should I replace it with ?

I have the jars, tomatoes, and going tomorrow morning to a special Indian shop in a town not so far from Tel Aviv for some of the spices.

Come to think of it, that Chutney would be perfect with Latkes and sour cream.

"Eat every meal as if it's your first and last on earth" (Conrad Rosenblatt 1935)

http://foodha.blogli.co.il/

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Hi Suvir,

This Chutney made me want to join the heat almost from the start (of the thread). I located almost all the ingredients in our little Mid-East corner, but I'm afraid the fresh curry leaves are out at the moment. what should I replace it with ?

I have the jars, tomatoes, and going tomorrow morning to a special Indian shop in a town not so far from Tel Aviv for some of the spices.

Come to think of it, that  Chutney would be perfect with Latkes and sour cream.

It is amazing with the Potato Pancakes I make. They are actually not different at all from Latkes.

Curry leaves are essential to this recipe. If you cannot find fresh leaves, get the frozen or dry ones. And use close to double of what is called for. At least one and a half times more. You can get curry leaves shipped to you by calling an Indian store like Foods Of India in NYC.

I shall look and post a link to them next.

Have fun making the chutney, and keep us posted on how it turns out and what you think about it as a side to Latkes. :smile:

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Northern part pf Tel Aviv, Israel.

Thanks, but maybe I'll be able to get some young plants of curry in a nursery nearby.

A curry plant is very different from an herb also called the curry plant. Curry leaves are the leaves of a medium sized tree. Not to be mistaken with that herb. The chutney would be better without that other curry thingie...

I am not sure how I can help you.. Sorry! Do you have any Indian restaurants in Tel Aviv? Any Indian groceries?

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I get the picture :sad: in the Indian groceries, some said they are out of, the other told me that the "little plant" should do. I'll call some restaurants tonight, and see.

A friend from a local food forum is willing to donate some leaves but it seems its also that herb.

"Eat every meal as if it's your first and last on earth" (Conrad Rosenblatt 1935)

http://foodha.blogli.co.il/

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My chutney is on the stove (electric too-it sucks). I didn't chop my tomatoes as finely as FM. The best looking ones I could find were Romas, and I cut them into 12ths. I also added 12 oz of tomato paste. The man at the Indian grocery didn't have sambhaar, and suggested I use tumeric. Since tumeric is already in the mix, I left the sambhaar out. Hope it still turns out as good everybody elses. It smells terrific!!!

I'll keep you posted.

Stop Family Violence

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My chutney is on the stove (electric too-it sucks). I didn't chop my tomatoes as finely as FM. The best looking ones I could find were Romas, and I cut them into 12ths. I also added 12 oz of tomato paste. The man at the Indian grocery didn't have sambhaar, and suggested I use tumeric. Since tumeric is already in the mix, I left the sambhaar out. Hope it still turns out as good everybody elses. It smells terrific!!!

I'll keep you posted.

Do you have any curry powder at home? You can add that instead of the sambhaar. And you can add it now.

Electric stove will be fine. And the coarser tomato will be great.

All the best Dana. :smile:

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I get the picture :sad:  in the Indian groceries, some said they are out of, the other told me that the "little plant" should do. I'll call some restaurants tonight, and see.

A friend from a local food forum is willing to donate some leaves but it seems its also that herb.

Check out the little plant. If it has the same leaves as the ones above. That is fine.

Ask the restaurants if they will spare some for you...

If the restaurant cooks Southern Indian food, they should have these leaves.

If not, PM or email me your address. I will mail you some curry leaves.

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Jars are in the pot for processing. I would reccomend putting a washcloth inthe bottom of the pot. The jars rattle as the water is simmering. I remember my Grandma doing this, but didn't think about it till the rattling started.

Stop Family Violence

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