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Tomato Chutney


Suvir Saran
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I think Cathy has said all that needs to be said about tomatoes at least in the case of this chutney.

All I do is to cut the tomatoes in half. And remove the part where the stem was.

If you are pureeing the tomatoes, just blend them without any more worries.

Frying the chilies in the oil with the mustard seeds till the chiles are a very dark brown.. just a second away from burning.. will give the chutney a great smoky flavor that Eric Asimov mentions in his review of Diwan.

Are you making the chutney today Dstone?

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CathyL I'm glad you brought this back to the fore if to say that is not mutually exclusive--yikers better get out the Macrosanian Thought Italics--hope I'm using that belabored hackneyed unclear-from-the-get-go phrase correctly not at all sure.

The other week-end I was rooting around on my pantry shelf and knocked off a cute little tubular package of papadums from the Indian store and it came open and strewed itself like so many (yikers) little daal-based Pringles across the kitchen floor which seemed clean enough so I collected 'em and crisped 'em to eat later with cream cheese and World-Famous Tomato Chutney. I think topping papadums is somewhat heretical but it was in the privacy of my own home, well, in the garden, actually, and John Ashcroft hasn't sent anybody around as yet.

Priscilla

Writer, cook, & c. ● #TacoFriday observant ●  Twitter    Instagram

 

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CathyL I'm glad you brought this back to the fore if to say that is not mutually exclusive--yikers better get out the Macrosanian Thought Italics™--hope I'm using that belabored hackneyed unclear-from-the-get-go phrase correctly not at all sure.

The other week-end I was rooting around on my pantry shelf and knocked off a cute little tubular package of papadums from the Indian store and it came open and strewed itself like so many (yikers) little daal-based Pringles™ across the kitchen floor which seemed clean enough so I collected 'em and crisped 'em to eat later with cream cheese and World-Famous Tomato Chutney.  I think topping papadums is somewhat heretical but it was in the privacy of my own home, well, in the garden, actually, and John Ashcroft hasn't sent anybody around as yet.

:laugh::laugh::laugh::laugh::laugh::laugh::laugh:

And I would be a fool to not thank Jaymes for paging me to this thread. Thanks Jaymes. I needed this laugh.

I love papadum with some chutney.. always a great snack.. and I would do it anywhere.... At least if I am not shackled in Guantanamo for looking like a ..... :shock:

Priscilla, have you made more than one batch? Did you find it very difficult to make? What has been the reaction of your friends and family to the chutney?

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:laugh:  :laugh:  :laugh:  :laugh:  :laugh:  :laugh:  :laugh:

And I would be a fool to not thank Jaymes for paging me to this thread.  Thanks Jaymes.  I needed this laugh.

I love papadum with some chutney.. always a great snack.. and I would do it anywhere.... At least if I am not shackled in Guantanamo for looking like a ..... :shock:

Priscilla, have you made more than one batch?  Did you find it very difficult to make?  What has been the reaction of your friends and family to the chutney?

Suvir, I made two batches, with my garden tomatoes, and I am jealously guarding my 10 or so (or fewer, now) jars. CathyL's using unlovely tomatoes here this a.m. has got me inspired to make more, however, and some of my farmer's market growers still have tomatoes, even.

Not difficult to make. A real pleasure, in fact, as we were discussing earlier on up there, somewheres. I've canned things before so I was hip to that, but never anything so just plain exotic. It is, I swear, exotic enough for Marlon Brando to marry.

People who taste it have their minds blown. (A good thing.) Mostly it has been something the Consort and I have enjoyed with drinkies, as in the aforementioned Papadum Rescue. However, and timely this is, indeed, tonight I'll be making Simon Majumdar's Bengali Fish Soup, and maybe there'll be a role for tomato chutney.

Priscilla

Writer, cook, & c. ● #TacoFriday observant ●  Twitter    Instagram

 

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I believe Stone, Esq. is implying that you're not an attorney, and that you should be grateful therefor. :laugh:

Oh Priscilla, papadums with chutney! How brilliant, albeit heretical. Must find some...to be eaten in the privacy of my own home, of course (of course).

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Suvir, I made two batches, with my garden tomatoes, and I am jealously guarding my 10 or so (or fewer, now) jars.  CathyL's using unlovely tomatoes here this a.m. has got me inspired to make more, however, and some of my farmer's market growers still have tomatoes, even.

Not difficult to make.  A real pleasure, in fact, as we were discussing earlier on up there, somewheres.  I've canned things before so I was hip to that, but never anything so just plain exotic.  It is, I swear, exotic enough for Marlon Brando to marry.

People who taste it have their minds blown.  (A good thing.)  Mostly it has been something the Consort and I have enjoyed with drinkies, as in the aforementioned Papadum Rescue.  However, and timely this is, indeed, tonight I'll be making Simon Majumdar's Bengali Fish Soup, and maybe there'll be a role for tomato chutney.

Priscilla, the chutney is great with not so great tomatoes.

In fact for some reason, maybe the cold of the winter may have something to do with this, it tastes better in the winter.

I make curried boiled eggs with the chutney. I have made chicken breasts marinated with it and then served with a tomato chutney and cream sauce.

I have made home fried potatoes with tomato chutney.

I have used it CathyL style with roasted cauliflower.

So where is the recipe for the Simon M, Bengali fish soup? Can you post on that thread so more of us can enjoy that recipe... :smile:

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Suvir, Simon mentioned in the Dungeness crab discussion a soup based on the reserved crab shells simmered with tomato and spices, strained, and then fish, preferably mackeral, added to cook.

(Simon also said the fish can be coated in turmeric and fried and THEN added to the soup, which sounds perfectly mind-blowing and is how I plan to proceed tonight. Also said a tarka/tadka is optional, cloves, cardamom, a dried chili, and a chopped shallot, fried and stirred in before the eyes and noses of those assembled. I do not consider this optional, once hearing of it.)

I also plan to take off on a Paul Prudhomme plating technique for gumbo, and place a timbale-shaped cone of cooked basmati in the center of the soup plates.

Priscilla

Writer, cook, & c. ● #TacoFriday observant ●  Twitter    Instagram

 

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I wish.  I don't know if the word "interrogatory" means anything to you, but beleive me, I wish I were making chutney.

Are you implying that my grasp of this language is that poor? :shock:

What keeps you from making it Stone Man? :unsure:

I am spending my day like so:

Do you contend that any defendant "

".

If your response to the above is not an unqualified "no", state all facts that support the contention.

If your response to the above is not an unqualified "no", identify all persons with knowledge of facts that support the contention.

If your response to the above is not an unqualified "no", identify all documents that support that contention.

Identify all facts that support your allegation at paragraph X of the complaint that "

"

repeat.

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I wish.  I don't know if the word "interrogatory" means anything to you, but beleive me, I wish I were making chutney.

Are you implying that my grasp of this language is that poor? :shock:

What keeps you from making it Stone Man? :unsure:

I am spending my day like so:

Do you contend that any defendant "

".

If your response to the above is not an unqualified "no", state all facts that support the contention.

If your response to the above is not an unqualified "no", identify all persons with knowledge of facts that support the contention.

If your response to the above is not an unqualified "no", identify all documents that support that contention.

Identify all facts that support your allegation at paragraph X of the complaint that "

"

repeat.

And here you are on eGullet. Billable hours?

After being here, one thing I DEFINITELY plan to ask the next attorney I interview before hiring is, "Foodie, per chance?"

I plan to eliminate any possibility they get hooked here!!! :laugh:

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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I wish.  I don't know if the word "interrogatory" means anything to you, but beleive me, I wish I were making chutney.

Are you implying that my grasp of this language is that poor? :shock:

What keeps you from making it Stone Man? :unsure:

I am spending my day like so:

Do you contend that any defendant "

".

If your response to the above is not an unqualified "no", state all facts that support the contention.

If your response to the above is not an unqualified "no", identify all persons with knowledge of facts that support the contention.

If your response to the above is not an unqualified "no", identify all documents that support that contention.

Identify all facts that support your allegation at paragraph X of the complaint that "

"

repeat.

My day I can promise you has not been too different from yours. :wink:

And I tend to prefer the chutney I make at night.

Go figure.

No excuses. :rolleyes:

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I wish.  I don't know if the word "interrogatory" means anything to you, but beleive me, I wish I were making chutney.

Are you implying that my grasp of this language is that poor? :shock:

What keeps you from making it Stone Man? :unsure:

I am spending my day like so:

Do you contend that any defendant "

".

If your response to the above is not an unqualified "no", state all facts that support the contention.

If your response to the above is not an unqualified "no", identify all persons with knowledge of facts that support the contention.

If your response to the above is not an unqualified "no", identify all documents that support that contention.

Identify all facts that support your allegation at paragraph X of the complaint that "

"

repeat.

And here you are on eGullet. Billable hours?

After being here, one thing I DEFINITELY plan to ask the next attorney I interview before hiring is, "Foodie, per chance?"

I plan to eliminate any possibility they get hooked here!!! :laugh:

Always ahead of the others. :cool:

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Suvir, Simon mentioned in the Dungeness crab discussion a soup based on the reserved crab shells simmered with tomato and spices, strained, and then fish, preferably mackeral, added to cook.

(Simon also said the fish can be coated in turmeric and fried and THEN added to the soup, which sounds perfectly mind-blowing and is how I plan to proceed tonight.  Also said a tarka/tadka is optional, cloves, cardamom, a dried chili, and a chopped shallot, fried and stirred in before the eyes and noses of those assembled.  I do not consider this optional, once hearing of it.)

I also plan to take off on a Paul Prudhomme plating technique for gumbo, and place a timbale-shaped cone of cooked basmati in the center of the soup plates.

Sounds amazing.. All of it.

And yes I too would make all the optionals compulsory. :smile:

Is there anyway you can post pictures of this stuff? You have me sooooo very curious to see all that you are making.. I can smell the spices.. and taste the flavors... :rolleyes:

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Haven't got the gear in place for online photos yet...although it is in the works, it won't be ready for tonight!

No problems. I fear nothing. I know your words will weave even a richer experience for us to salivate upon tomorrow.

Thanks for sharing as you so generously do. :smile:

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I just stumbled on this tomato chutney thread today and I have to say WOW!!! I cannot wait to try it. However since the tomato season is over is it ok to use some tomatoes available now (perhaps some organic ones from Central Market)? What should I look for in the tomatoes?

I really never tatsed tomato chutney before so I would love to try it especially if homemade. I do enjoy Canning and I usually do jams and jellies both sweet and spicy. So preserving a savory Indian tomato chutney sounds heavenly. Is it worth the try with off-season tomatoes? or should I wait till next summer!!!

FM

E. Nassar
Houston, TX

My Blog
contact: enassar(AT)gmail(DOT)com

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I recently made my sixth batch of this wondrous chutney, and I think it's the best yet.  Suvir gave me permission to use sorry winter tomatoes; I added another 6 oz. can of tomato paste to compensate. 

After trying it with the tomatoes either chunked or puréed, I've settled on the latter.  The textural contrast with the mustard seeds and the bits of curry leaf is very pleasant.

I also strip the curry leaves off their central vein; in one batch these didn't dissolve into the chutney, and while the taste wasn't affected the appearance was.

Of all the ways I enjoy this chutney, my favorite is to mix it with mayonnaise as a dip for roasted cauliflower.

Foodman,

CathyL made the chutney using whatever was available locally. And she has made her best batch yet. :smile:

Just get the best tomatoes you can find. Organic is great. Puree them and follow the recipe.

It is a fool proof recipe. And will give you and yours great joy.

And post on t his thread any question you might have. We now have many Tomato Chutney experts (Queen of Tomato Chutney is CathyL), who would be willing to answer your questions.

It is really easy and very tasty.

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Thanks for the response Suvir. I will try making a batch this weekend with probably half the amount (4lbs).

It is a fool proof recipe. And will give you and yours great joy.

I'm sure it will bring me great joy, as for my loved one (wife) she is very sensitive to spicy/hot/heavely condimented foods and will probably not try it. This is why I cook Indian food for myself only and make them as hot as I like :smile:

FM

E. Nassar
Houston, TX

My Blog
contact: enassar(AT)gmail(DOT)com

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Well.

His Handsomeness and I were lucky enough tonight to taste this chutney made by The Great Man himself. I think others have used the phrase "blown away" on this thread, and it is entirely accurate.

First, the red, rich voluptuous taste of the tomatoes. Then the taste of the sophisticated spices. Then the thousand watt blast of heat. Folks, it's hot. But the interesting thing is that the heat isn't the first thing on your palate.

Incidentally, I was in contact with another (very esteemed)eGulleteer today, who had recently tasted this chutney. She said Suvir should bottle it, sell it, and retire a rich man!

Thank you all for your suggestions on using this magic stuff. I've been making "chutney" for years. Basically fruit, usually apples or pears, garlic, onions ,raisins, garam masala, mustard,sugar and vinegar. Good sweet and sour stuff, good with plain grilled meat.

Now I realize that it's for tourists!

Many thanks, Suvir. You might want to start a condiment empire.

Margaret McArthur

"Take it easy, but take it."

Studs Terkel

1912-2008

A sensational tennis blog from freakyfrites

margaretmcarthur.com

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FoodMan, the tomatoes for my last batch were purchased at a farmers' market but were not very flavorful on their own. To compensate, I added another 6 oz. can of tomato paste to Suvir's full recipe.

The whole process of making this is fun and satisfying - shopping for the ingredients, measuring out the spices, inhaling the aroma as curry leaves hit hot oil, watching the color deepen as the chutney simmers...

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Suvir -

I did receive the tomato chutney that you were kind enough to send me.

As per your suggestion, yesterday at lunchtime, I did halve (lengthwise) and then lightly fry two hard-boiled eggs which I ate with the chutney.

And then, last night, had some leftover pork roast which I also ate with the chutney.

It is absolutely delicious to be sure.

As you know, I am cooking for one most days, and might not have occasion to prepare a complicated dish using your chutney until the next time I have dinner guests. But I always have in my freezer some individually-frozen orange roughy filets. Often, I take out just one and spoon over some salsa and pop it into my toaster oven for a few minutes. I am planning on trying it with the chutney either tonight or tomorrow, and I am certain it will be delish!

The chutney is wonderful and I appreciate you taking the time to send me a sample. Now that I know how tasty it is, I'll obviously have to prepare some myself when this is gone.

Thanks again - :rolleyes:

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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ok it's pretty much 5PM and I'm heading out from work. I will stop by the local Indian grocery store and buy the spices for the Chutney. Hopefully I'll get a chance to make it this weekend. I'll report once I do.

FM

E. Nassar
Houston, TX

My Blog
contact: enassar(AT)gmail(DOT)com

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ok it's pretty much 5PM and I'm heading out from work. I will stop by the local Indian grocery store and buy the spices for the Chutney. Hopefully I'll get a chance to make it this weekend. I'll report once I do.

FM

All the best FM. A friend is insisting that I come out and play a little.. so, I am going out now, but will be back later... post your questions.. I am sure one of the Chutney Queens will reply when you post. I shall be back around later in the night.

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