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Tomato Chutney


Suvir Saran
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Back in the day (as I may have reported years upthread) Suvir sent me a jar of this chutney. What can I say -- it was phenomenal. Great recipe. if only I had some tomatoes...

Margaret McArthur

"Take it easy, but take it."

Studs Terkel

1912-2008

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  • 3 years later...

Good Lord. I just made this tonight. Absolutely delicious! And then, having spent the evening making chutney instead of dinner, I threw some basmati rice in the rice cooker, nestled some eggs in the rice, and hit "cook," then when they were done, peeled and halved them, sauteed them in butter, added a cup of the chutney and some heavy cream and heated through. Talk about low investment/high return. That's going to be my go-to late-night dinner until the chutney runs out, which will be all too soon, I fear. (It was my first time trying that egg-in-the-rice trick, and it worked brilliantly. A little more done than I'd ordinarily prefer, but probably just perfectly done to most people's taste.)

Thank you, Suvir!

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  • 4 weeks later...

Oh my gosh is right! I printed this recipe off YEARS ago (I can't believe it took me this long to finally make it!). I thought it sounded good, but not being very familiar with Indian cooking, I didn't know what many of the spices were and didn't have an Indian grocery nearby.

I was gifted with a ton of heirloom and yellow tomatoes and was starting to panic trying to think of what to do with them all. I recalled this chutney recipe and had to do a websearch for it; all I ccould recall was Suvir Saran was the author and it starte off with "I have missed this chutney..." :blink: .

I'm SO thankful for the wonders of search engines, LOL...I don't think I've ever had tomato chutney before and certainly never made it. I had to drive to another town for the ingredients, but it was SO worth it! I was afraid I'd strike out on the fresh curry leaves but I asked and so I received them; they are so fragrant and so yummy that I'm thinking of using curry leaves in everything now :smile: .

The colors and the fragrances are an experience in and of themselves. I was a little worried that it was going to be way too hot for me or anyone I know, and so when I added the cayenne, after reading Cathy L's review, I used 1 1/2 TB. A little more than she did the first time, but not as much as the recipe cited. It was just perfect for my palate. I got started a little late last night, finishing cooking it just around midnight, so I let it cool and put it in the fridge partially covered overnight. Got to work, put it on the stove to reheat and cook down a bit and then went ahead and canned it. I have to admit to frequent taste tests; it's soooooo delicious! Now I want to make more; I know people are going to love getting this as a gift!

Thank you again, Suvir, for posting this recipe and to everyone who contributed their uses of it. It really is a stellar (and yes, FUN) recipe! I can't wait to have some with crackers this afternoon!

Seana

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  • 2 weeks later...

will late end-of-season tomatoes work in this recipe? please, please....or must I wait until next summer?

Yup - never made it with anything else. By the time I get around to making stuff for bottling - it's always late in the season!

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  • 3 weeks later...

Thank you whoever revived this thread! I made this last night with some pretty pedestrian tomatoes (store bought special vine on, 99cents a pound) that I'd left on my counter for a week to ripen a bit, and it turned out absolutetly delicious. I was committed to making this true to the recipe, so I ordered the spices I couldn't get here in Nowhereville through the mail.

It is just as good as everyone here says. It had a bite, but it wasn't as hot as I like chutneys to be, so I think next time I will double the chilies. I am truly afraid to can anything since my neighbor killed her husband with some pickled asparagus a few years ago, so I froze the remaining chutney in small containers. Hope this works.

I also think that if I have to use store-bought plastic tomatoes next time, I will throw in a big can of San Marzano tomatoes for sweetness and lovely tomato flavor. But these would be my own minor tweaks to a truly fabulous recipe. Thank you Suvir.

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  • 1 month later...

i'm grateful that 8 years later, we're still posting on this thread. i remember when this chutney recipe was first, first posted. good to see that people are still appreciating suvir's wonderful contributions to this board.

here's my question for the cognoscenti: does anyone know where to buy curry trees in the US? i live in south florida, and could probably grow one in my back yard. the aroma of freshly-picked curry leaves is almost too ecstatic to bear ... i would love to be able to have them every day.

corax
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i'm grateful that 8 years later, we're still posting on this thread. i remember when this chutney recipe was first, first posted. good to see that people are still appreciating suvir's wonderful contributions to this board.

here's my question for the cognoscenti: does anyone know where to buy curry trees in the US? i live in south florida, and could probably grow one in my back yard. the aroma of freshly-picked curry leaves is almost too ecstatic to bear ... i would love to be able to have them every day.

Here you go.

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  • 5 years later...
  • 1 year later...
On 8/19/2016 at 4:22 PM, Okanagancook said:

Bumping up this topic since it is tomato season!

if you have not made this, give it a go.  Amazing.  The recipe is on the first page of this thread.

:x:x

 

...aaand...it's almost tomato season again! *Bump*

  • Like 3

Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
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"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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