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Pickled eggs


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I am quite fond of pickles and adore eggs, however until two nights ago when I ate one that tasted strongly of red wine vinegar at a fine new NYC restaurant called Stand, I'd never eaten a pickled egg. The eating of it has motivated me to pickle some of my own.

What I know so far:

the base for the cure is salt, sugar, vinegar

the duration is 2 days to 3 weeks

I'd love to hear how people pickles theirs and in addition of experiences people have had in eating them in midwest bars or elsewhere.

You shouldn't eat grouse and woodcock, venison, a quail and dove pate, abalone and oysters, caviar, calf sweetbreads, kidneys, liver, and ducks all during the same week with several cases of wine. That's a health tip.

Jim Harrison from "Off to the Side"

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Beet juice.

:biggrin:

Hubby loves them, but I have to sleep on the couch after an afternoon of his eating pickled eggs and drinking beer - due to the aroma.

The ceiling fan has yet to be invented to overcome that particular challenge.

Edited by annecros (log)
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I am quite fond of pickles and adore eggs, however until two nights ago when I ate one that tasted strongly of red wine vinegar at a fine new NYC restaurant called Stand, I'd never eaten a pickled egg.  The eating of it has motivated me to pickle some of my own. 

What I know so far:

the base for the cure is salt, sugar, vinegar

the duration is 2 days to 3 weeks

I'd love to hear how people pickles theirs and in addition of experiences people have had in eating them in midwest bars or elsewhere.

Wow, what timing, I am doing a batch today.

Here is my recipe and a couple of others I have tried.

Pickled Eggs 1

This recipe comes from the

‘Texas Rangers Cookbook” I have tried it and it is good.

1 cup beet juice

1 cup vinegar

4 cups water

1 – 2 cloves garlic, crushed

1 bay leaf

2 tsp pickling spice

½ tsp salt

1 med onion, chopped

Pour all ingredients over peeled hard boiled eggs and let stand for 3 – 4 days

Pickled Eggs 2

This recipe is similar to the Texas Rangers recipe but it uses more vinegar and more spices and the recipe calls for simmering everything together for a few minutes to blend the flavors.

1 Can / bottle pickled beet juice

3 cups vinegar

1 cup water

3 – 4 cloves garlic, crushed

1 Bay leaf

3 – 4 tbl pickling spice

½ tsp salt

1 med onion, chopped

3 tbl sugar

Cracked pepper to taste

1 tbl mustard seed

1 tbl dill seed

1 tbl mixed whole spices

Put all ingredients into a sauce pan and bring to a boil, simmer for 8 -10 minutes.

Pour over peeled hard boiled eggs. Let stand in refrigerator for at least two days, preferably longer.

Alton Browns pickled eggs

This recipe comes from Alton Brown, one of the Food Network chefs. I haven’t tried it yet but the liquid smoke seems interesting.

Dark and Lovely eggs

21/2-C cider vinegar

¾-C water

11/2-tbl dark brown sugar

1 tbl-granulated sugar

11/2-t pickling spice

¼-t liquid smoke

1-tbl salt

¾-t pepper flakes

Hard cooked eggs

Place everything in a saucepan, cook until sugar is dissolved. In a jar pour solution over the eggs. Refrigerate 4 weeks. Keeps in refrigerator for 2 months

Classic Pickled eggs

I did try this recipe and it is a very mild recipe. The cider is something different and it isn’t bad but I prefer more vinegar taste.

21/2-C apple cider

¾-C champagne vinegar

1-tbl salt

2-t pickling spice

6- whole cloves garlic

Hard cooked eggs

In a jar pour solution over the eggs. Refrigerate 4 weeks. Keeps in refrigerator for 2 months

Things you can do to personalize the recipe.

Vinegar – White vinegar is pure manufactured chemistry. Use white vinegar for cleaning countertops and floors.

Apple cider vinegar is good. It has a nice apple flavor and is one of the strongest tasting vinegars. White wine vinegar is also very good to use. Slightly milder flavor, so if you want to soften the taste try this.

Sugar – White or brown sugars are both good. Try them separately and see if you can tell the difference.

Vinegar to water ratio. More water for a lighter taste. More vinegar for a tart taste. You decide.

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Thanks everybody!!

In the meantime I've started with a base formula (which seems strong to me but I did it anyway):

3 cups vinegar (I did 1.5 cups of L'Estornell, 1.5 white)

1 cup water

1/3 cup sugar (refined)

1/3 cup salt (kosher)

To this I added

4 large cloves of garlic, peeled

3 medium shallots, peeled

2 small fennel bulbs, quartered

black pepper seeds

anise seed

mustard seed

cumin

You shouldn't eat grouse and woodcock, venison, a quail and dove pate, abalone and oysters, caviar, calf sweetbreads, kidneys, liver, and ducks all during the same week with several cases of wine. That's a health tip.

Jim Harrison from "Off to the Side"

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  • 9 months later...

Hah! I knew there would be a thread - one just has to look.

I have pickled my first batch of eggs. These are the providers:

gallery_42214_4635_90956.jpg

And these are the eggs, plus a few jars of hot peppers:

gallery_42214_4635_91773.jpg

Won't taste them for a few weeks. Two issues so far:

1. Peeling the superfresh hard boiled eggs was a mess, chunks of white came off with the shell. Any suggestions?

2. My whole garlic has turned blue. WTF?

Peter Gamble aka "Peter the eater"

I just made a cornish game hen with chestnut stuffing. . .

Would you believe a pigeon stuffed with spam? . . .

Would you believe a rat filled with cough drops?

Moe Sizlack

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I never use fresh eggs. Its to much trouble to peel them. I always let the eggs set in the refrigerator for at least 5 days, 7 days is even better.

What Jack said is correct. When boiling eggs, it's the one time where fresh eggs are not the best thing to use.

As for the blue garlic, it's still edible.

Here's a previous discussion on the phenomenon:

My Garlic turned blue!

 

“Peter: Oh my god, Brian, there's a message in my Alphabits. It says, 'Oooooo.'

Brian: Peter, those are Cheerios.”

– From Fox TV’s “Family Guy”

 

Tim Oliver

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I've done it. They make for a quick breakfast before fishing. Don't be afraid of adding some hot peppers to your mix. I've gotten recipes off a few different websites but have not yet found one to personalize. I also was told to pierce the white with a thin tined fork before adding the pickling solution but I keep forgeting that step.

Edited by JimH (log)
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I never use fresh eggs. Its to much trouble to peel them. I always let the eggs set in the refrigerator for at least 5 days, 7 days is even better.

What Jack said is correct. When boiling eggs, it's the one time where fresh eggs are not the best thing to use.

As for the blue garlic, it's still edible.

Here's a previous discussion on the phenomenon:

My Garlic turned blue!

Thanks for that.

Now I'm dreaming up some creepy Halloween food featuring blue garlic.

Peter Gamble aka "Peter the eater"

I just made a cornish game hen with chestnut stuffing. . .

Would you believe a pigeon stuffed with spam? . . .

Would you believe a rat filled with cough drops?

Moe Sizlack

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I find the biggest problem with pickled eggs is my lack of will power to resist eating them before they are ready. I think even if they are peeled when submerged in the pickling liquid, they still take way more than a few days for the flavour to penetrate - I would say a couple of weeks is ideal.

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I find the biggest problem with pickled eggs is my lack of will power to resist eating them before they are ready. I think even if they are peeled when submerged in the pickling liquid, they still take way more than a few days for the flavour to penetrate - I would say a couple of weeks is ideal.

Now that is interesting. I maintain that most pickled eggs are only pickly-tasting on the outside. I'll bet the albumen pin-prick technique mentioned earlier would help quite a lot.

I have always associated pickled eggs with English pubs. I wonder what the story there is . . . how they came to be on a rack at the bar . . . anybody?

Peter Gamble aka "Peter the eater"

I just made a cornish game hen with chestnut stuffing. . .

Would you believe a pigeon stuffed with spam? . . .

Would you believe a rat filled with cough drops?

Moe Sizlack

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I also have trouble waiting. I like to add the juice from a jar of pickeled beets to my eggs. It turns them a nice purple color and adds a little flavor. It takes about a week for the color to completely turn all of the white to purple. So I believe they are still curing for the first 6-7 days.

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infuse your vinegar with all forms of pepper, pickled habeneros work great...

you can also pickle some smoked sausage links with your eggs........

eggs and pickles are a staple in eastern NC, find em in most any country store....

require beer to wash egg down........

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For easy peeling, put the newly boiled eggs in cold water for 10 minutes or so. The easiest way is to discard as much of the hot water as you can and then put the pot under the tap and let the water run until it stays cold.

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  • 2 years later...

Do not pierce the eggs. There have been cases of botulism from doing that. It was a mystery as to how pickled eggs could get botulism, but when questioned the patient explained the recipe in detail. He pierced the eggs and then poured over the brine. He did keep them un-refrigerated too. So double whammy as botulism can't grow in cold (though not all forms are as sensitive to cold) or acid environments. So let the brine find it's way in naturally.

The piercing infected the eggs, and the botulinum bacteria grew and formed toxins before the brine could stop it. A whole cooked egg is safe, but when you stick things into them....?

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  • 1 year later...

I found that adding some baking soda to the water can help with peeling.

We can our garden beets, and they are wonderful to use in making pickled eggs.

I drain the beet juice to a pan, add some water, cider vinegar, sugar, salt, peppercorns, garlic, shallots and a bit of pickling spice. Bring just to a boil.

I like to use 1/2 gallon mason jars to store. Fill with the eggs and beets then add the juice. Into the frig for a week.

I sometimes take the pickled eggs and make pickled/deviled eggs. Yum!

:smile:

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  • 1 month later...

I've just made two batches -- one without shells and one with shells a la Harold McGee. I've noticed that the version with shells has a film that's come off of the shells. Anyone know if this is normal?

Edited by 12BottleBar (log)
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