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Tough wine pairing


sadistick
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Well, I plan on making a beet stock to use as the liquid, reducing it and having a strong beet flavour. If when you say toasted you mean cooking the rice before deglazing till they become translucent, then yes...always :)

I plan on using a mild flavoured cheese to finish the risotto, havent decided on that part yet, but im sure there will be parmigiano and maybe pecorino.

Just need a wine pairing for this course.

What other clues do you require?

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First pecorino in a risotto? I don't think so. Too intense for the delicate rice and too sharp for the sweet beets.

Matching a wine is not a problem. The sweetness of the beets requires a dry wine of with intense fruit sweetness. A modern styled Dolcetto is just the ticket. I would recommend the most current vintage available of Marcarini Dolcetto or another gem like that.

You can find my risotto method here

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A really fruity Pinot Noir might work too, although I like Craig's suggestion of a dolcetto a lot.

Domaine Serene Yamhill Cuvee could be a worthy contender.

Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol

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That Domaine Serene is freakin' delicious!

The Dierberg 2004 Santa Maria Valley Pinot Noir I tasted today might be a good match too.

Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol

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First pecorino in a risotto? I don't think so. Too intense for the delicate rice and too sharp  for the sweet beets.

Matching a wine is not a problem. The sweetness of the beets requires a dry wine of with intense fruit sweetness. A modern styled Dolcetto is just the ticket. I would recommend the most current vintage available of Marcarini Dolcetto or another gem like that.

You can find my risotto method here

A younger pecorinno would contrast the sweetness of the beets quite well actually. Especially when its a blend of cheese and not all that much pec.

You guys mention Pinot for the fruit etc...would a shiraz work? or would that be too big?

Cheers.

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I guess I don't see the point in using a beet stock for a beet risotto. It will end up tasting like a plate of mushy beets. Use a veggie stock for the cooking process and add the beet "essence" at the end when you mount it with a little butter. Ditch the pecorino idea and mount the risotto with marscarpone in place of the butter.

Suggest a white - Maybe an Albarino or Gavi? Reds? Dolcetto is a great choice or a Barbera (Pio Cesare?)

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I guess I don't see the point in using a beet stock for a beet risotto. It will end up tasting like a plate of mushy beets. Use a veggie stock for the cooking process and add the beet "essence" at the end when you mount it with a little butter. Ditch the pecorino idea and mount the risotto with marscarpone in place of the butter.

Suggest a white - Maybe an Albarino or Gavi? Reds? Dolcetto is a great choice or a Barbera (Pio Cesare?)

Nice recipe idea.

A lot of this depends upon how rich and

intensely beety this risotto will be.

also white wine would be ideal.

However, I would suggest a richer fuller bodied white.

Chardonnay with some buttery richness and with earthy notes.

A nice big Burgundy or one of the modern style Italians.

for red--I would stay lighter and dry, a Barbaresco or one of the

better Valpolicellas!

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I guess I don't see the point in using a beet stock for a beet risotto. It will end up tasting like a plate of mushy beets. Use a veggie stock for the cooking process and add the beet "essence" at the end when you mount it with a little butter. Ditch the pecorino idea and mount the risotto with marscarpone in place of the butter.

Suggest a white - Maybe an Albarino or Gavi? Reds? Dolcetto is a great choice or a Barbera (Pio Cesare?)

Gordon, it definetly wont end up tasting like a plate of mushy beets, at least not if I'm cooking it :wink:

If you use a reduced liquid which is strained properly, that will give an intense beet flavour to the risotto...adding a 'essence' of beet at the end will not achieve as strong a flavour, trust me.

I have done it this way for tomato risotto as well as mushroom - make a well flavoured liquid and use that as the cooking liquid, and it comes out amazing each time.

Not to toot my own horn or anything, but I have won a few risotto competitions in the past, so this method is tried tested and true.

Oh, and no marscapone will ever come near any of my risotto's :raz:

I actually have a Pio Cesare barbera...but its only a 98 and I wanted to hold on to it for a few more years...I am thinking a lighter fruity pinot at this point.

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I actually have a Pio Cesare barbera...but its only a 98 and I wanted to hold on to it for a few more years...I am thinking a lighter fruity pinot at this point.

Should be delicious right now, I'd think.

We cannot employ the mind to advantage when we are filled with excessive food and drink - Cicero

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I actually have a Pio Cesare barbera...but its only a 98 and I wanted to hold on to it for a few more years...I am thinking a lighter fruity pinot at this point.

Should be delicious right now, I'd think.

Even if it's Barbera D'Alba - it's ready to go. I guess I enjoy nice roasted beets but not enough to showcase them - even a world cup risotto.

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A younger pecorinno would contrast the sweetness of the beets quite well actually.  Especially when its a blend of cheese and not all that much pec.

You just made every Italian reading this cringe. I'd have to disagree on that. A good pecorino is too pungent. Of course, the industrial version is almost flavorless so that would not be a problem.

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I actually have a Pio Cesare barbera...but its only a 98 and I wanted to hold on to it for a few more years...I am thinking a lighter fruity pinot at this point.

Why would you want to do that? A regular Pio Cesare Barbera could be past its prime at this point. They certainly don't make it with aging in mind. This kind of barbera is all about the fruit - not about bottle age.

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It's funny you mentioned beet risotto. In last the NY Times 2 weeks ago they reviewed Felidia in N.Y. and raved about a beet risotto with Humboldt Fog Goat Cheese and Balsamico Tradizionale. What a combo!

If you don't eat your meat, you can't have any pudding. How could you have any pudding if you don't eat your meat!??

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