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Naked Chocolate Café


philadining
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OK, I didn't actually see any naked people there, and it's a classy place, so Fenton, don't get any ideas. I'm guessing they're referring to the often unadorned, unobscured chocolatey goodness...

www.nakedchocolatecafe.com

It's at 1317 Walnut, which is to say, just around the corner from Capogiro, which presents a real dilemma when looking to quiet the yearnings of a sweet tooth. As the weather cools I suspect the decision might increasingly point this way, especially given that Naked Chocolate Cafe serves some seriously decadent hot chocolate.

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That's a gargantuan "Frozen Drinking Chocolate" on the left, which they say can be for one or two, and sure enough one normal person would likely be overwhelmed. eGulleteers? might need two. This was sort of like an extremely intense chocolate milkshake, but somehow even more chocolatey that any milkshake I've ever tasted. On the right is a "petite" Sipping Chocolate, which is hot, thick, creamy, amazing... The big frozen drink is $6, the petite sipping chocolate is $4.50. They have 4 different types of hot chocolate, coffee, teas, and combinations of the three. (Yes, they offer chocolate teas!)

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Much of the store is taken up by cases that contain their chocolate candies, baked goods, mousse, puddings, pots de creme, etc. It's a little overwhelming. Suffice it to say: chocoholics, make your way there immediately.

I was a bit choco-saturated by the drinks (no, I didn't drink BOTH of them....) so I didn't try anything else, except for a sample of pistachio bark up on the counter, which was pretty tasty. But I'll be back for more.

Looking at the photos later, I had to laugh at an accidental reflection from across the street:

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So, I guess there are always other options too....

"Philadelphia’s premier soup dumpling blogger" - Foobooz

philadining.com

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gallery_23992_3472_66101.jpg

That's a gargantuan "Frozen Drinking Chocolate" on the left, which they say can be for one or two, and sure enough one normal person would likely be overwhelmed.  eGulleteers? might need two.  This was sort of like an extremely intense chocolate milkshake, but somehow even more chocolatey that any milkshake I've ever tasted. On the right is a "petite" Sipping Chocolate, which is hot, thick, creamy, amazing...   The big frozen drink is $6, the petite sipping chocolate is $4.50. They have 4 different types of hot chocolate, coffee, teas, and combinations of the three. (Yes, they offer chocolate teas!) 

Hot damn, that looks good. I got an email with that 2-for-1 coupon, and have been meaning to try it. It'll definitely come in handy, because it looks like I won't be sharing a Frozen Drinking Chocolate with Mr. Duck.

That Sipping Chocolate looks like it’d go really well with a churro. Mmmm…churro. Gotta un-ass my chair and get to Apamate.

Edited by I_call_the_duck (log)

Karen C.

"Oh, suddenly life’s fun, suddenly there’s a reason to get up in the morning – it’s called bacon!" - Sookie St. James

Travelogue: Ten days in Tuscany

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Do they use butter or hydrodgy shortening in their baked goods?

What's hydrodgy shortening? Is this a food allergy issue?

If we're looking for lower fat, we could exclude the chocolate. But that would trivialize this thread (and the cafe.)

Charlie, the Main Line Mummer

We must eat; we should eat well.

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Here's what we tried last week...the hot chocolate (very good) and the frozen chocolate drink (beyond good). The latter's not like a milkshake (they have those too) but like cold, very rich, partially-frozen liquid chocolate.

They serve these nudo things for dessert that are very good (like a chocolate cake pyramid), but the chocolate mousse was just average and a bit dry. They do have fabulous cupcakes (tried chocolate/chocolate and vanilla/vanilla) and both were better than any other cupcakes in town and remind me of what you might get in NYC.

Also had a few pieces of the chocolate (which can be bought by the piece and mixed and matched) and that was good too.

Somehow managed to eat it all but this precluded lunch for 2 of the 3 of us!

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We happened to be on the east side of Broad Street for a change, and with the coupon burning a hole in my bag, I insisted that we stop there for dessert. Since I have trouble sleeping if I have copious amounts of sugar and caffeine close to bedtime, we shared one Frozen Drinking Chocolate (for which they charged us half price with the coupon). Though I wanted the Mocha, we opted for the Aztec blend--which according to the menu, has nutmeg, cinnamon, cardamom, and cloves. It was as philadining said, very chocolatey and quite good.

We didn’t get any of the pastries, but I had a sample at the register.

Only a few more days until the coupon expires. Can’t wait to go back. I may even go without a coupon.

Karen C.

"Oh, suddenly life’s fun, suddenly there’s a reason to get up in the morning – it’s called bacon!" - Sookie St. James

Travelogue: Ten days in Tuscany

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Do they use butter or hydrodgy shortening in their baked goods?

What's hydrodgy shortening? Is this a food allergy issue?

I imagine it's short for hydrogenated fats, substances not found in nature that have been used for quite a while in processed, manufactured foods in order to maintain their shelf life and save a few pennies for the manufacturer. It's in most baked or fried goods you see at the average supermarket. They are created by forcing teeny tiny hydrogen bubbles into fats that are liquid at room temperature (usually the cheapest ones that happen to be available at the moment), making them more solid at room temperature, and longer-lived. They are also very bad for you, though exactly how bad is the subject of some debate, and also depends on the amount of hydrogenation.

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Do they use butter or hydrodgy shortening in their baked goods?

What's hydrodgy shortening? Is this a food allergy issue?

I imagine it's short for hydrogenated fats, substances not found in nature that have been used for quite a while in processed, manufactured foods in order to maintain their shelf life and save a few pennies for the manufacturer. It's in most baked or fried goods you see at the average supermarket. They are created by forcing teeny tiny hydrogen bubbles into fats that are liquid at room temperature (usually the cheapest ones that happen to be available at the moment), making them more solid at room temperature, and longer-lived. They are also very bad for you, though exactly how bad is the subject of some debate, and also depends on the amount of hydrogenation.

Bingo! (although you left out that butter is in a different universe of flavor, as well - far superior)

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I just got a press kit in the mail for Naked Chocolate Cafe, and the menu looks really good.

I will be going here sooner rather than later, I'm sure.

Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol

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I love chocolate. I am planning to make a special trip, which I do not do that often, just to try this place.

Finding good chocolate is not an easy task.

"One cannot think well, love well, sleep well, if one has not dined well." - Virginia Woolf

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Do they use butter or hydrodgy shortening in their baked goods?

What's hydrodgy shortening? Is this a food allergy issue?

I imagine it's short for hydrogenated fats... <snip>

Bingo! (although you left out that butter is in a different universe of flavor, as well - far superior)

Which makes it a silly question. Who would serve Tastykakes at a serious dessert business? (Tastykakes have their place, but I would never expect, say, Shola to serve me one.)

Since the Thomas Sweet folks are involved in Naked Chocolate, I'll bet the only place they'd not use butter is to offer a "low" fat option buried deep on their menu. I think a low fat chocolate dessert is almost as ridiculous as low fat foie gras. If you want less fat, eat a smaller portion.

Charlie, the Main Line Mummer

We must eat; we should eat well.

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Since the Thomas Sweet folks are involved in Naked Chocolate, I'll bet the only place they'd not use butter is to offer a "low" fat option buried deep on their menu.  I think a low fat chocolate dessert is almost as ridiculous as low fat foie gras.  If you want less fat, eat a smaller portion.

I'd like to see Kandy Kakes or Butterscotch Krimpets, as reimagined by Shola.

Herb aka "herbacidal"

Tom is not my friend.

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Since the Thomas Sweet folks are involved in Naked Chocolate, I'll bet the only place they'd not use butter is to offer a "low" fat option buried deep on their menu.  I think a low fat chocolate dessert is almost as ridiculous as low fat foie gras.  If you want less fat, eat a smaller portion.

I'd like to see Kandy Kakes or Butterscotch Krimpets, as reimagined by Shola.

So would I. The people at Metropolitan Bakery do an amazing interpretation of a Mallomar, and I can only imagine what Shola would do with a Tastykake creation.

Karen C.

"Oh, suddenly life’s fun, suddenly there’s a reason to get up in the morning – it’s called bacon!" - Sookie St. James

Travelogue: Ten days in Tuscany

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She Who Must Be Obeyed and I stopped by this afternoon and we were both suitably impressed -- and SWMBO is even more demanding about her chocolate than me. She went for the classic hot chocolate and pronounced it delicious; I very much enjoyed the frozen chocolate. We tasted some nut bark samples on the counter and were impressed by the European chocolate approach; it seemed made in the French style. We'll be back to sample more of the offerings.

I was also surprised by the traffic. Even though it was 3 p.m. on a muggy Friday in late August, when everyone was either on vacation or taking an early quit to get to the Shore, they were busy, with a short line at the counter. My guess is that this fall and winter, especially leading into the holidays, they will be very busy.

Bob Libkind aka "rlibkind"

Robert's Market Report

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Do they use butter or hydrodgy shortening in their baked goods?

What's hydrodgy shortening? Is this a food allergy issue?

I imagine it's short for hydrogenated fats... <snip>

Bingo! (although you left out that butter is in a different universe of flavor, as well - far superior)

Which makes it a silly question. Who would serve Tastykakes at a serious dessert business? (Tastykakes have their place, but I would never expect, say, Shola to serve me one.)

Since the Thomas Sweet folks are involved in Naked Chocolate, I'll bet the only place they'd not use butter is to offer a "low" fat option buried deep on their menu. I think a low fat chocolate dessert is almost as ridiculous as low fat foie gras. If you want less fat, eat a smaller portion.

It would be a silly question... if they both cost the same. Butter is more expensive and its use is a reliable benchmark for quality. You'd be suprised how many places don't use butter - but don't expect them to tell you. It's easier pulling teeth than getting them to admit it sometimes.

One of the reasons I'm counting the days until Le Petit Mitron opens (Sep 8) is because Patrick and Isabel use butter exclusively, and it shows.

Edited by bob tenaglio (log)
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It would be a silly question... if they both cost the same. Butter is more expensive and its use is a reliable benchmark for quality. You'd be suprised how many places don't use butter - but don't expect them to tell you. It's easier pulling teeth than getting them to admit it sometimes.

One of the reasons I'm counting the days until Le Petit Mitron opens (Sep 8) is because Patrick and Isabel use butter exclusively, and it shows.

I have always heard from people who are more fanatical about pies than I am (which isn't hard) that shortening makes for a better crust than butter, and supposedly it lends a better texture to biscuits and scones as well, but I think I'll stick with fats that exist in the natural world. Or as the grandma of some guy on the internets said one time, 'never trust a fat that's solid at room temperature'.

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Or as the grandma of some guy on the internets said one time, 'never trust a fat that's solid at room temperature'.

poor ol' grandma, never heard of lard, or beef tallow. or butter, for that matter.

wait a minute, maybe her room temp was higher than mine....

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Sooooo... Does this place use flavorful butter or profitable shortening? And if a mix, does it skew toward the wallet or the tastebuds?

It's butter. Saw many 1lb. blocks of PLUGRA no less, sitting on the counter in the chocolate room.

This place is a great addition to the scene. The hot drinking chocolates are top notch. I tried the Aztec spiced and the bittersweet and both were freakin' awesome. As it cools it develops a pudding-like texture that's irresistable. Tried a sample of one of the nut barks as well. These folks are really doing chocolates right. Watched the owner banging out molds of beautiful glossy dark chocolate hearts and wrapping them for storage. He let me into the kitchen for a second so I could see the big 100 pound heated vat of chocolate. I wanted to dive in it and do flip turns. Looked really good. Like Willy Wonka come to life in my own demented chocolate fantasy. :rolleyes:

This place is the cure for all that ails a woman craving chocolate. And you know who you are... :raz:

Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol

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