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Brown Rice

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Stephen, apology accepted. I like brown rice too. But I'm particular about the rice in terms of texture and flavour. Ideology is tasteless and viewing food in terms of "nutritional components" is boring. Brown rice is too tasty to be sullied by anti-white rice rhetoric. And white rice has its place too. For example, one cannot seriously make sushi with brown rice or any Japanese kaiseki cuisine for that matter. Different grains for different uses.

But while we're discussing nutritional values, if anyone hasn't tried spelt or some of the other "ancient grains", I'd recommend the investigation. Quinoa (too eensy for my purposes) for example is very high in protein.


"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

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Actually brown rice has a lot more protein, if you read the packages.

And, I use 2x water to 1x rice. It works out great in my mediocre rice cooker.

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A lot of the newer rice cookers have separate functions for brown rice. Mine cooks it with same amount of water as white rice but for a longer period of time. It turns out perfect. If your rice cooker doesn't have this function, then I would do it on the stove instead, experiment with the proportions to find out what works best for you. The rice to water ration can be different among different brands, and even among the same brand at different times of the year. For example, Japanese "new" rice or "new crop" should be made with slightly less water than the rice from the older crop.

I love the nutty flavor of brown rice, but I rarely buy it here in Japan because it is hard to find and a 2 kg ( about 5 lbs) bag starts at $10. Since we can go through 20kg a month in our family, it rarely sees a place on our shelves.


Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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I thought I'd mention that brown rice is slightly healthier than white. But only very slightly.

Another illusion shot to hell! Curses! :shock:

What are the benefits of using a rice cooker over a plain old pot with a lid?

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Well, for one thing, it seems to come out perfect every time -- separate grains, no clumpiness, etc.

I like the pot method better though.

SA

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Actually brown rice has a lot more protein, if you read the packages. 

Brown rice has 2.5, white has 2.1. Hardly significant.

When paired with the proteins in miso shiru, tofu, and shitake mushrooms both will become adequate.


"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

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I like the rice cooker for the convenience, especially when you make rice a lot, I make 5 to 6 cups everyday. It always turns out perfect, you never have to worry. It's great because you can set the timer when you leave the house in the morning and when you come home it will be all ready and waiting for you. It is also convenient when you want rice for breakfst, just set it up the night before. In Japan where most people have only 2 burners on their stove, it gives you more space to cook. Then of course you can keep the rice warm for hours or even days (like my Mother in law does), especially good if you will be using it at one than more meal.

Japanese rice, brown rice, and jasmine rice all work great in my rice cooker, so I usually do them there, basmati on the other hand gets much better results on the stove.


Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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One of the health benefits that brown rice offers is the increased dietary fiber and fat. The refining of white rice gets rid of these benefits.

Not to say that white rice is bad for you though. I do believe, however, that rice portions are crazy in the states at least. A usual portion around here in Seattle is like the size of a baby's head!

Ben


Gimme what cha got for a pork chop!

-Freakmaster

I have two words for America... Meat Crust.

-Mario

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Actually brown rice has a lot more protein, if you read the packages.  

When paired with the proteins in miso shiru, tofu, and shitake mushrooms both will become adequate.

Brown rice has 2.5, white has 2.1. Hardly significant.

My packet of Uncle Ben's brown rice says it has 5g/serving...

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Actually brown rice has a lot more protein, if you read the packages.  

When paired with the proteins in miso shiru, tofu, and shitake mushrooms both will become adequate.

Brown rice has 2.5, white has 2.1. Hardly significant.

My packet of Uncle Ben's brown rice says it has 5g/serving...

Whatever. The figures I've cited are from the "US Rice Foundation". (The link is on the first page for their chart.)

2, 3, 5, 7 are all insignificant values for human life.

Basically folks, if grains are your main source of protein you need to eat a worm or an egg or something right now. You can process soy beans into tofu or miso later. Eat the worm. Now. Egad. Grains are only a meaningful source of protein when paired with legumes. And even so, you'd wind up with less protein from a huge bowl than from an egg.

Eat rice because it tastes good. Eat a wide range of grains because they're great. Eat a wide range of greens and sources of proiteins because they're wonderful and available to you because you don't have to gnaw on a raw root while waiting for the next incursion to take out your village.

Eating brown rice instead of white has no meaning unless it's delicious.


"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

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Jin, you're preaching to the choir.

At least, this choir anyway.

hehe

Show me a piece of nigiri sushi made with brown rice, and I'll gag.

:sad:

SA

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Actually brown rice has a lot more protein, if you read the packages.  

When paired with the proteins in miso shiru, tofu, and shitake mushrooms both will become adequate.

Brown rice has 2.5, white has 2.1. Hardly significant.

My packet of Uncle Ben's brown rice says it has 5g/serving...

Whatever. The figures I've cited are from the "US Rice Foundation". (The link is on the first page for their chart.)

2, 3, 5, 7 are all insignificant values for human life.

Basically folks, if grains are your main source of protein you need to eat a worm or an egg or something right now. You can process soy beans into tofu or miso later. Eat the worm. Now. Egad. Grains are only a meaningful source of protein when paired with legumes. And even so, you'd wind up with less protein from a huge bowl than from an egg.

Eat rice because it tastes good. Eat a wide range of grains because they're great. Eat a wide range of greens and sources of proiteins because they're wonderful and available to you because you don't have to gnaw on a raw root while waiting for the next incursion to take out your village.

Eating brown rice instead of white has no meaning unless it's delicious.

That site is wacked. 2.5g protein per 1/2 cup?? My rice package says 5g per 1/4 cup.

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That site is wacked.  2.5g protein per 1/2 cup??  My rice package says 5g per 1/4 cup.

Its not a competition, folks.

In the larger scheme of things, keeping in mind modern sensibilities, wouldn't you rather eat something because it tastes great than because you'll live longer? I know I would.

I eat pretty healthily -- my cholestorol count is 120 and my blood pressure is 110/70 at age 31, among other things. Wheat grass juice might be good for my long-term well being, but wild horses couldn't make me drink it on a regular basis. Ditto with brown rice. I'll eat it every so often, but I wouldn't recommend making a risotto with it.

eeek! brown rice shrimp risotto...sort of on par with pad thai -- Roxanne style.

SA

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Grains are only a meaningful source of protein when paired with legumes.

Maybe this is a subject for a different thread, but I keep hearing people talk about tofu as being "high in protein". It's then served in salads or with vegetables. My understanding is that legumes like soy have little usuable protein (for humans that is) unless paired with rice. (A long time ago it was explained to me that humans need to ingest something like 22 amino acids in order to provide the building blocks necessary to make the proteins in our bodies, and that while certain non-meats will supply many (most?) of these amino acids, only meat or legume/rice combination will supply them all.)

Discuss?

Any smug scientific bastards out there with some good info?

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That site is wacked.  2.5g protein per 1/2 cup??  My rice package says 5g per 1/4 cup.

Its not a competition, folks.

In the larger scheme of things, keeping in mind modern sensibilities, wouldn't you rather eat something because it tastes great than because you'll live longer? I know I would.

I eat pretty healthily -- my cholestorol count is 120 and my blood pressure is 110/70 at age 31, among other things. Wheat grass juice might be good for my long-term well being, but wild horses couldn't make me drink it on a regular basis. Ditto with brown rice. I'll eat it every so often, but I wouldn't recommend making a risotto with it.

eeek! brown rice shrimp risotto...sort of on par with pad thai -- Roxanne style.

SA

I think that both rices have their virtues. Brown rice has a really great nutty flavor, but it can have a texture that is incompatibale with many dishes.

White rice has a lovely texture, but not too much flavor. I would, however much rather use it in virtually all rice dishes.


Gimme what cha got for a pork chop!

-Freakmaster

I have two words for America... Meat Crust.

-Mario

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I also believe that each rice has its own purpose and I eat them to enjoy them. My house is always stocked with Japanese rice, brown rice, jasmine rice and basmati. And depending on what is for dinner I will decide which rice to prepare. I am not a health freak but I do eat healthy and no food is off limits

Brown rice has its complimentary foods, I love it with adobo and in fried rice, but I wouldn't eat it with most Asian dishes and never in a risotto.

I have a friend who only eats brown rice ("becasue it is good for you"), she makes it with Indian curries and even serves it with sashimi.

Of course this same woman substitutes margarine ("because it is good for you") in all of her baking and then she calls me up to ask why my cake recipe turned out so bad.

Don't forget though that a bowl of white rice served with a big thick and juicy T-bone steak is going to have 10 times the protein that a bowl of brown rice and a salad, and I know which one I would rather die eating!

So seriously folks, just eat what ever you want, just make sure it tastes good and you are happy eating it! :raz:


Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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Brown rice is wonderful when paired with braised meat and mushrooms. (But better when barley is mixed in as well.) And great with butter and chiles.

But I can't think of an Asian dish where it would be appropriate. Except as crispy rice, smothered with gomasio.

Not for risotto. Not for congee (jook).

Never for sushi of any sort or kind.

Okay as a stuffing for duck or Cornish hen. But better with wild rice mixed in.


"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

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Because it's brown rice?


"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

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I believe because brown rice "kernels" have a protective layer (gives it the brown color) that has been removed from the white rice. I think I heard this on "Good Eats".

FM


E. Nassar
Houston, TX

My Blog
contact: enassar(AT)gmail(DOT)com

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Because it's brown rice?

Jin come on , you could ahve been a little more helpful! :biggrin::shock:

Brown rice is rice that hasn't been milled and polished and still has the outer coating of bran, therefore it takes longer for the water to completely penetrate and soften it.


Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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I DID hear it on "Good Eats":

"like most grains the inner part of the kernel or endosperm is surrounded by a thin layer of bran which is where most of the nutrients are. Since its a tough little cuss, brown rice needs about 3 times as much water and time to cook as the same amount of white rice. The hassle is worth it, though, because brown rice has a great nutty flavor and a stronger nutritional punch than its buffed up brother."-- excerpt from "Power To the Pilaf"


E. Nassar
Houston, TX

My Blog
contact: enassar(AT)gmail(DOT)com

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