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Take it from a fraischer, fresher tastes better. Yesterday we were driving near Staffordville New York on our way back from Rhinebeck Antique Show when we passed a sign in front of a farm offering "fresh eggs" and "piglets." While I love bacon and eggs, I was only up for making the latter half of that plate as a scratch meal, so we wheeled in to the barn. The pungent smell of cow manure hit me, along with waves of big black flies circling in the humid air. A sign pointed to a small refrigerator which contained about six dozen eggs packed in assorted commercial boxes, obviously supermarket leftovers. A coffe can on the top of the box asked that I deposit $1.75 for a dozen, $3.25 for two and $4 for three dozen. "Return of cartons will be appreciated" the sigh added. I took one and put $2.00 in, fishing out a quarter for my change as the flies began to zero in on the back of my neck.

I lifted a box and was immediately struck by how heavy it was. I had never felt a dozen eggs that weighed as much as these. Quick inspection revealed twelve perfect large bown speckled specimens, (say that five times fast). Hopping into the shelter of the car, we headed for the Taconic Parkway and an omelette.

Three eggs cracked in a mixing bowl. Amazing, the shells paper thin, whites were as clear as water, the yolks firm and plump. A shame to mix them up. A simple omelette would be best. Some hot and sweet italian sausages diced and fried up nicely, some onion slowly cooked in the sausage fat. Pour the eggs in the fat-greased pan, add the onions and sausage when the eggs firm up a bit, fold over and slide into a plate. Add some nice fat slices of beefstake tomato, freshly pulled from the patio plants, sit on the porch to eat.

How'd it taste? One of the best omelettes ever (sparing the one I had in Sancerre two years ago). Next sampling will be sunny-side ups. Conclusion; farm fresh eggs really do taste better.

But then, we discusssed this before, didn't we?

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I also think they taste very much better, even though they're cheaper :wink: However very fresh eggs don't fry the same way as older eggs. The whites are much thinner, and they cook too quickly compared with the yolks. Whenever I've had farm fresh eggs, the white ends up leathery if I fry them.

I think you got it absolutely right with an omellete, and pan-fried scrambled are great.

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However very fresh eggs don't fry the same way as older eggs. The whites are much thinner, and they cook too quickly compared with the yolks. Whenever I've had farm fresh eggs, the white ends up leathery if I fry them.

Interesting. I noticed how clear and almost "watery" the whites seemed. Given the weight I felt, I wonder if the yolks of these were larger, in proportion to the whole, adding weight to the egg?

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And now that you've discovered fresh eggs, fresh chicken should be next, yes? Try the Messerich's at Union Square on Saturdays: the chickens are killed (that's really what it is so why mince words?) on Friday for market on Saturday. I don't think you can get it any fresher than that, at least in NYC. And they're going to become Kosher some time soon, something which will be reported here, of course of course.

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Uh, we refer to these as "recently dead" chickens.

"Differently living" is the most polite form.

"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

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Wow, Jaybee. I'm impressed with your purchase. We pay a minimum of 3.00 and up to $4. a dozen for fresh free-range. And I'm glad to hear your reenforcement of my opinion that they are much more fragile than supermarket eggs: whites more delicate, and yolks break much easier when cooking "easy over". But well worth the pennies difference and the extra care in cooking.

eGullet member #80.

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Well, of course Margaret, if you factor in the cost of gas and tolls from NYC to Stanfordville NY, the price would hit your level. But fortunately, there are still many farms in our neck of the woods (Putnam, Dutchess County), so weekends yield lots of fresh produce.

There's a place called Quattros Game Farm on Rt., 44 off the Taconic that sells pheasant eggs very inexpensively. These are even eggier than hen's eggs.

edit: good grief. I must average two typos per word.

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Jaybee, you've just completely pre-empted my experience of buying fresh duck eggs yesterday from a farm in Cheshire. I paid £1.50 for a dozen enormous extra-large eggs, and scrambled a couple of them up last night with some crumbled piccante Spanish chorizo, onions, tomatoes and a wee bit of chopped coriander.

My observations:

- the yolks were HUGE

- the shells were fragile, but the membrane inside the shells was very thick

- the white was very thick and reassuringly gloopy

- the resulting scramble ended up sunflower-bright yellow, which I'm sure was partially due to the healthy yellow of the eggs themselves, and partially to chorizo's oozing paprika-orange oils.

- two eggs, two chorizo, a tomato and half an onion made enough to feed two comfortably. They were BIG eggs

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Jaybee, can you describe what it was about them that tasted so good to you?

The best way for me to describe them is to say that everything you like about the taste of eggs is magnified by two.

MissJ, seems as we were on the very same page this weekend, egg-ly speaking. I take it you had the experience, so I only preempeted your post. :biggrin:

It was a good meal, wasn't it?

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Jaybee, can you describe what it was about them that tasted so good to you?

The best way for me to describe them is to say that everything you like about the taste of eggs is magnified by two.

Hmm. I will reflect on this. Perhaps Cabrales has a list already prepared?

Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
Co-founder, Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, sshaw@egstaff.org
Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code
Director, New Media Studies, International Culinary Center (take my food-blogging course)

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My Grandmother used to raise her own chickens and we always had fresh eggs. As kids we hated them. They were too rich, too yellow and too eggy (!) for eggs. I've recently purchased fresh eggs from some local growers in Montgomery Co. and Fredrick Co. Maryland. They are always great looking, huge, fresh tasting eggs. But to me they have a wild, almost fish-oil taste to them. I get the same taste from Eggland's Best eggs. I guess if I ate more of them I would adjust. I've been on mostly egg whites for the last five months so have probably lost my taste for real yolks.

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