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Artichokes


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On 9/11/2020 at 3:57 PM, Margaret Pilgrim said:

 

With apologies for sounding flip, a professional what?    That is an extraordinary statement.

 

A food professional, he trained as a cook and impressed me with spaghetti and fresh tomato sauce  from scratch. I trusted his judgement.

 

It might not be so extraordinary, as I don't think we had access to proper fresh artichokes back in those days.

 

Lucky you @heidih!

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On 9/9/2020 at 4:00 PM, MetsFan5 said:

Ok, next in “MetsFan5” learns to cook is going to artichokes. Thanks to Jo, I know our local grocery store has artichokes. 
 

   I have very limited experience with them. When my husband was growing up in the Bay Area, they had plants in their back yard. He doesn’t know how to cook them (I’m assuming steaming but I do also have an unused Instant Pot) and he remembers what I’m thinking is a very lemony aioli. Besides the IP, I have a gas range and a large pot with a steamer basket as well as a Big Green Egg. 
 

   Any advice for a beginner? I know I can consult cookbooks but you all are likely to have tricks, tips and hints to make this better, easier and tastier! 
 

 

 

My way, adapted from my father's, is not necessarily the best but works for me. Trim off the stem. Trim off the top of the bud - this makes the next step nicer by removing the spikes. You don't need to get all the spikes, just cut it off to expose most of the inside leaves. Then I run the artichoke under cold water, gently spreading the leaves apart. Getting water down inside and spreading the leaves apart speeds up the cooking considerably, especially for big ones. Then I put in a deep pot with a couple of cm of water and steam until you can pull the leaves off easily.

 

My father was big on brown butter but I really like dipping in balsamic.

It's almost never bad to feed someone.

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4 hours ago, haresfur said:

 

My way, adapted from my father's, is not necessarily the best but works for me. Trim off the stem. Trim off the top of the bud - this makes the next step nicer by removing the spikes. You don't need to get all the spikes, just cut it off to expose most of the inside leaves. Then I run the artichoke under cold water, gently spreading the leaves apart. Getting water down inside and spreading the leaves apart speeds up the cooking considerably, especially for big ones. Then I put in a deep pot with a couple of cm of water and steam until you can pull the leaves off easily.

 

My father was big on brown butter but I really like dipping in balsamic.

 

It's years since I prepped or cooked artichokes, but this is more or less the way I used to do it. I never thought about using a water stream from the faucet to spread the petals apart, though. That sounds like it would be helpful.

 

Hollandaise sauce is my preferred accompaniment.

Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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1 hour ago, Smithy said:

 

It's years since I prepped or cooked artichokes, but this is more or less the way I used to do it. I never thought about using a water stream from the faucet to spread the petals apart, though. That sounds like it would be helpful.

 

Hollandaise sauce is my preferred accompaniment.

 

Yes that was 70's traditional dip. Mom and bestie took cooking classes through Southern California Edison (ya know the All Electric Home era). We were on a deck overlooking the island and thought - channelling @Kim Shook "What fresh hell is this?" - but it was fun and great. These days I go more gussied up mayo. 

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Okay.   I'll give you my secret weapon sauce.

 

Put a splat of sour cream or creme freaiche in a very small saucepan, like less than pint size.    Add a tablespoon of mashed preserved lemon (peel).    Mix together and bring to a simmer.   Whisk in as much cold butter as it will hold,    (A lot!)     Use with artichoke, asparagus, fish, shellfish.        Keep waem over very warm water.    Reheat with caution, as it breaks easily.   If it does, add a tablespoon heavy cream and re-emulsify.  

 

Guests beg for the recipe.    Fabulous with scallops.    Scallop and asparagus plate.   With artichoke, serve in a tiny bowl for dipping.

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12 hours ago, Smithy said:

 

It's years since I prepped or cooked artichokes, but this is more or less the way I used to do it. I never thought about using a water stream from the faucet to spread the petals apart, though. That sounds like it would be helpful.

 

Hollandaise sauce is my preferred accompaniment.

 

Now that you mention it, my father would often use his mock Hollandaise (roux based)

It's almost never bad to feed someone.

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