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Artichokes


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Have you ever tried some homemade mayo and dijon mixed together? It is good. Or is that too fatty?I can't remember what's good or bad this week to the next.

That's what I usually do. I have tried substituting yogurt and it was pretty good-- not mayo, but good.

peak performance is predicated on proper pan preparation...

-- A.B.

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Take some sour cream or creme freche (low fat if necessary). Stir in some Dijon, dill, salt and pepper. Light and tangy but you can still taste the artichoke.

True Heroism is remarkably sober, very undramatic.

It is not the urge to surpass all others at whatever cost,

but the urge to serve others at whatever cost. -Arthur Ashe

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I'm not crazy about using salad dressings. Actually, I'm not crazy about salad dressing in general -- usually I just toss my salads in an evoo/balsamic vinegar combo.

Mayo is ok, just in small amounts... I like the sound of a dijon vinagrette though. GG -- I tried clicking on the link but only got the pesto mayonnaise -- what am I doing wrong??

how would you doctor up a yogurt? i like that idea!

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GG -- I tried clicking on the link but only got the pesto mayonnaise -- what am I doing wrong??

Nothing wrong whatsoever.. that is all that is there now .. the other dipping sauces in that list are mine .. from my head actually ... :hmmm:

Melissa Goodman aka "Gifted Gourmet"

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GG -- I tried clicking on the link but only got the pesto mayonnaise -- what am I doing wrong??

Nothing wrong whatsoever.. that is all that is there now .. the other dipping sauces in that list are mine .. from my head actually ... :hmmm:

Lol ... ok, so how would you make it?

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amyknyc, a raita is easy to make, and can reflect what your usage will be. It is basically an Indian salsa added to yoghurt. With the taste of the choke being real light, maybe cucumber tomato and onion would overpower it, but what about some yogurt, red wine vinegar and cumin mixed together, or dijon and yogurt with dry mustard for some more tang? Guacamole just popped into my head, but tasting it in my mind, maybe not.

Experiment, and I say, that if you really like the hollandaise and don't go flippers-up with it, make yourself happy, child! Life is very short, and artichokes are a little space of heaven to those who love them. :smile:

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I make a pretty cool Dijon vinaigrette for my salads so this is worth a try with artichokes as well:

In your food processor, process up 3 individual garlic cloves with some fresh

parsley

add to processor:

1 teaspoon salt

1/4 teaspoon freshly gound black pepper

1 teaspoon prepared Dijon mustard

1 teaspoon paprika

1/3 cup wine vinegar

2/3 cup of a combination of olive and regular vegetable oil

Process until smooth .. chill and let flavors meld ... mmmmm :biggrin:

Melissa Goodman aka "Gifted Gourmet"

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I love simple, steamed artichokes. But I grew up dipping the leaves in oh-so-unhealthy hollandaise sauce.

I'm looking for something lighter, but not too sharp (I've tried an oil/balsamic vinegar combo but it tasted too much like salad dressing). In my mind artichokes should be dipped in something tangy and creamy. Any suggestions?

What do you use?

My family's favorite dip for artichokes is

actually something that's a cross between

cucumber raita and mint chutney:

1. make a simple cucumber raita (1 grated cuke,

1 cup yogurt or buttermilk, salt, black pepper, toasted cumin seed, powdered).

2. blend: 1/2 cup cilantro, 1/8 cup mint leaves (optional),

1/2 green chili, splash lemon juice, pinch sugar, salt to taste.

mix #2 with #1.

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Hollandaise is just about perfect. That is probably why it is so popular with artichokes. It is one of those matches made in heaven.

I say go for the hollandaise and cut back somewhere else if you must. After all, how much hollandaise can you actually consume eating an artichoke? It can't be that bad if you put it into perspective . . . Wait! Strike that! I was just remembering my son eating artichokes with hollandaise. :blink:

Actually, some of the yogurt combos sound really good.

Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

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Hollandaise is just about perfect. That is probably why it is so popular with artichokes. It is one of those matches made in heaven.

I say go for the hollandaise and cut back somewhere else if you must. After all, how much hollandaise can you actually consume eating an artichoke? It can't be that bad if you put it into perspective . . . Wait! Strike that! I was just remembering my son eating artichokes with hollandaise.  :blink:

Actually, some of the yogurt combos sound really good.

Yeah, there's no such thing as hollandaise in moderation in my house. Instead, there's leaves so weighed down with huge globs of the stuff! I don't mind it once in a while, but I was just looking for alternatives. I like the dijon vinagrette and the raita... time to go experiment!

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Artichokes have been a favorite food of mine since I was about three years old and my dad told me that they were named after a French king named Art whose mean wife killed him with the "choke" part of the artichoke (you know, the gross inedible insides) and thus, the name. Plus it is delicious. With hollandaise, number one.

It is also good with olive oil, drawn butter & lemon and a little sauce called "chervil sauce" that an ex's mom made with hers...it was like a dijon-based sauce and the chervil was really good.

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One of the best things that I could think of would be bagna cauda, or in Italian, "hot bath". Equal parts anchovie, good for you extra virgin olive oil, and raw garlic, blended, and then heated over a medium high heat until it starts to bubble a little bit.

Tonyy13

Owner, Big Wheel Provisions

tony_adams@mac.com

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OK, reporting back a bit late here but I did end up making artichokes a couple of nights ago and I ended up using GG's dijon vinegrette (mostly based on the fact that I didn't have any mayo in the fridge).

First of all, great vinegrette! It was nice and light and had a little kick -- it was a good staple. But it also reminded me of how much I love creamy things with artichokes and the next day I went out and :shock: bought mayonnaise for like the first time in 5 years.

On a related note, since it's been so long since I bought mayo, there were some new things in the aisle. Has anyone tried these soy-based mayonnaises like Nayonaise, or something like that? Are they any better for you?

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. . . . .

On a related note, since it's been so long since I bought mayo, there were some new things in the aisle. Has anyone tried these soy-based mayonnaises like Nayonaise, or something like that? Are they any better for you?

GACK! I haven't tried them and will not, very likely. My current favorite is Mayonessa from Hellman's (I think the brand is Best on the west coast) and is made with lime juice.

Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

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OK, reporting back a bit late here but I did end up making artichokes a couple of nights ago and I ended up using GG's dijon vinegrette (mostly based on the fact that I didn't have any mayo in the fridge).

First of all, great vinegrette! It was nice and light and had a little kick -- it was a good staple. But it also reminded me of how much I love creamy things with artichokes and the next day I went out and :shock: bought mayonnaise for like the first time in 5 years.

On a related note, since it's been so long since I bought mayo, there were some new things in the aisle. Has anyone tried these soy-based mayonnaises like Nayonaise, or something like that? Are they any better for you?

Soy "mayo" is perfectly acceptable as a sandwich spread but as a main ingredient, not so much. To my palate, I can really taste the soy. Not a bad flavor (love cold tofu with soy sauce) but it might overwhelm, say, an egg or potato salad.

Health wise it has less fat and cholesterol, but given how often you purchase mayo, the benefits would be negligible.

Shelley: Would you like some pie?

Gordon: MASSIVE, MASSIVE QUANTITIES AND A GLASS OF WATER, SWEETHEART. MY SOCKS ARE ON FIRE.

Twin Peaks

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Experiment, and I say, that if you really like the hollandaise and don't go flippers-up with it, make yourself happy, child! Life is very short, and artichokes are a little space of heaven to those who love them. :smile:

New here to posting, but I would have to agree with Mabelline on artichokes being a bit of heaven. I have them at home mostly with a lemon butter, but also love a garlicky mayo.

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