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Artichokes


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I love steamed artichokes braised artichokes, artichoke hearts, artichoke bottoms, but I'll admit my total ignorance here,

stuffed artichokes: how do you remove the choke while keeping the thing whole?

I am assuming you trim the leaves and base, and then somehow pry into the thing and scoop out the choke? I have been wanting to try making stuffed artichokes for the longest time but I always picture myself totally mangling them, so I usually just make some other preparation. I thought something like this recipe looked good, so could someone give me some pointers on how to prep the artichokes?

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It's a definite pain to be sure. Cut the top third of the artichoke off and pry out the prickly, purple leaves (you may neead to run a paring knife around/under them), then scoop out the choke. A grapefruit spoon works well for this. Then stuff the cavity. It took me a few tries to get it right, and you need to have relatively fresh, heavy-for-their-size artichokes: old, dry ones are brittle and tend to split or crack getting them out. Try to find the kind of artichokes that have rounded tips without the needles: they hold up better.

That recipe doesn't even mention scooping out the choke and purple inner leaves: quite an oversight on their part. Also, when cutting off the stems, trim them of the dark green outer skin down to their whitish core, finely mince them and mix them back in with the stuffing. The stem has the same flavor as the heart.

As to the bitter chokes in the risotto: all I can guess is that some of their dark green outer skin wasn't trimmed away enough.

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one afternoon we stumbled out of Boboli gardens and managed to find one of those "recommended hole in the wall" restaurants where they served us artichokes on a plate. raw, with lemon and a few drops of oil. we thought (for some time before eating it) that maybe it was a language issue, or "fresh" had a different meaning there.

it was interesting, but I prefer them cooked, with pepper mayonaise for dipping. or marinated in jars...somehow not as a toothsome shredding experience!

Decafalon (n.): The grueling event of getting through the day consuming only things that are good for you. twofish@iyume.com

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Thanks Kevin.

The process is what I assumed it was, it just always seemed somewhat formidable. As soon as I use up the groceries I already have I'll be trying this.

As for bitter chokes, there was a recipe for braised artichokes in SFGate this morning that said bitterness was caused by undercooking.

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This is a very simple step, but it was a revelation to me when I first learned it.

(Sort of a "doh" moment.)

When we steam artichokes, we like to put tons of herbs and spices on top of the trimmed choke (we go heavy with lemon pepper, but also use minced garlic, thyme, paprika, etc.). Then we pour the olive oil slowly over the herbs, opening the leaves a little so all that goodness sinks in between the leaves.

These recipes are giving me serious cravings, especially Soba's.

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Just recently figured out how to do grilled artichokes after coming into the motherlode of giant artichokes in the clearance rack of a large supermarket. They were huge and nearly as perfect as the ones they had in the regular bins. So, obviously I had to buy them all.

Snipped off the prickly tips of the leaves, took a slice off the top of each one so that it would look all tidy and neat, trimmed the stem slightly where it was dry. Steamed them until tender (standing up in a steamer basket) then cut the artichokes in half lengthwise and scooped out the hairy choke (it came out really easily). Marinated in olive oil, balsamic vinegar, salt and pepper. Then grilled on both sides until charred - it only took about 10 minutes. They were fantastic and didn't need any dipping sauce or anything more than an extra sprinkle of salt. I think I have found my perfect artichoke dish.

Son's girlfriend wouldn't even touch one, never mind eat it. I'm not sure I like her.

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  • 5 months later...

Artichokes :wub: . Recently I found giant artichokes at an unbelievable price, so now I have an obscene number of them in my fridge. I'm usually something of a purist - steam and eat with a little butter and salt. I'd like some new ideas.

Can you make gratins? If so, what do you do with the tough leaves? Do you just use the hearts? Stuffing ideas? Please share your favorite recipes for fresh artichokes. :smile:

Thanks-

Linda

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Artichokes  :wub: .  Recently I found giant artichokes at an unbelievable price, so now I have an obscene number of them in my fridge.  I'm usually something of a purist - steam and eat with a little butter and salt.  I'd like some new ideas.

Can you make gratins?  If so, what do you do with the tough leaves?  Do you just use the hearts?  Stuffing ideas?  Please share your favorite recipes for fresh artichokes.  :smile:

Thanks-

Linda

seafood or crawfish boil?

lemon butter to dip the leaves in..

dip the leaves in mayo

a recipe is merely a suggestion

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BTW,

I don't normally use microwaves for much regular cooking; but, some things do work well, especially for single diners.

If you get a craving for a whole steamed artichoke, a great way to do it is to, wash, trim, wrap tightly in platic wrap, and then cook on high in the microwave for 5-7 minutes. Let stand until cools slightly and look out for steam when you open.

Serve warm with salty melted butter or galicky aioli.

-Erik

---

Erik Ellestad

If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...

Bernal Heights, SF, CA

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several recipes here: especially that for BAKED ARTICHOKE CASSEROLE ...

Who knew there was a California Artichoke Advisory Board? :biggrin: What a wonderful organization.

I will definitely try the goat cheese recipe. It sounds fantastic.

Thanks for all the ideas!

:blink::wacko:

i dont knwo if its just me or what but ive long known that california is th heart of artichoke country..they even have an artichoke festival... so why would they not have an artichoke advisory board? we have advisory boards for many other things why not this too?

a recipe is merely a suggestion

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BTW,

I don't normally use microwaves for much regular cooking; but, some things do work well, especially for single diners.

If you get a craving for a whole steamed artichoke, a great way to do it is to, wash, trim, wrap tightly in platic wrap, and then cook on high in the microwave for 5-7 minutes.  Let stand until cools slightly and look out for steam when you open.

Serve warm with salty melted butter or galicky aioli.

-Erik

yummy..sounds good to me..i will have to keep this one in mind

a recipe is merely a suggestion

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Steam them in a pot that has 1/4 inch of water. Keep your eye on the water. Then eat it leaf by leaf and dip them in an apple cider vinegar/oil/salt sauce. Can add soy sauce too or cayenne.

I actually pressure cook them. You can't overcook them and even artichokes that look old and brownish are good enough to eat. Are from the thistle family

G

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  • 8 months later...

My approach is basic. Peel off the loose leaves. Steam it until the remaining leaves peel off easily. Melted together butter, cider vinegar salt and pepper for dipping. Patience comes in biting the pulp off the individual leaves until one comes to the heart. Scoop out the tiny leaves in the heart and savor what remains.

Holly Moore

"I eat, therefore I am."

HollyEats.Com

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And don't put the remaining leaves in the garberator.

I will never again put artichoke leaves in the garberator...

I once had a cat that performed that service. He loved to eat the artichoke leaves after we had scraped the meat off the leaves with our teeth. We simply passed the leaves to Alister who would eat every one of them.

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I once had a cat that performed that service.  He loved to eat the artichoke leaves after we had scraped the meat off the leaves with our teeth.  We simply passed the leaves to Alister who would eat every one of them.

I hope it was easier on him than on the garbage disposal!

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I love artichoke leaves dipped into plain melted butter with a little salt and pepper in it. Then swirl the heart around in the butter. The taste of the vegetable all by itself is delicious, and then with that drop of butter...divine.

Miriam

Miriam Kresh

blog:[blog=www.israelikitchen.com][/blog]

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I'll definitely be consulting this thread again. I ended up steaming the artichokes, melting some butter and pouring it over the artichokes so that it pooled in the hollow, then added lots of fleur de sel and freshly ground pepper.

I'm pretty sure I ate a couple of the leaves that weren't meant to be eaten, and I know I missed one of the thorns while trimming it and ate THAT as well (ouch!) but if I die it's been for a good cause.

I think any vegetable that encourages you to eat 1/4 cup or so of melted butter will absolutely be appearing on my dinner table more often. Do you think it would be over the top to have both artichokes and corn on the cob for supper? I may have to try the caper mayonnaise as well.

If only I'd worn looser pants....

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  • 10 months later...

*bump*

Thank heaven for the search engine, so I could find this thread fast.

I just got back from a lovely weekend in coastal California, where I had The.Best.Artichoke.I've.EVER.Had. It was at a restaurant in Carmel*. I think the artichoke had been steamed. I know it had been grilled, and that it had had olive oil and garlic drizzled among the leaves, with balsamic vinegar under (and for all I know within) the lovely flower. On the side were a fresh sauce of chopped tomato/basil/garlic, and a little dish of chipotle aioli. My mother, sister and I were nearly stabbing each other in our eagerness to get the bits and pieces. Wow, what a revelation to this artichoke lover. :wub:

So now I'm eager to try cooking artichokes myself again, after somewhat of a hiatus due to unsatisfactory results. My question to y'all is: how do you decide when to steam, when to braise, and when to boil an artichoke? What will be the resulting differences in texture and flavor?

*Little Napoli. Highly recommended by our hotel clerk, and with good justification.

Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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