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Artichokes


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I am also trying to expand my artichike horizons because I adore them and have not been adventurous. After research I have given up steaming and do the boil and a good drain. Steaming gives me an uneven result. I do the boil and a dip with the big suckers. The ones I can't get my hand around. I have started the braise looking to Italian preps for inspiration for the medium ones. The small ones I have started trimming and roasting, but I saw some really good looking ones on the dinner thread that were fried and then showered with parmesan. That is next on my "to try" list along with the classic Roman Jewish quarter prep of the squashed like a flower fried big guy. Gotta get moving before the season ends! I have to date not had an interesting stuffed version, but I have seen some on this site whose descriptions sound great and plan to do research.

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  • 2 years later...

We're well into artichoke season here in sunny California. The other night, we had a delicious grilled artichoke at a restaurant. It was dressed simply with olive oil, lemon juice and some nice crunchy salt. I've always steamed or simmered artichokes but this seemed simple enough to make at home: trim, peel the stem, slice vertically, remove the choke, add a little olive oil & salt, & grill. Well, that didn't work. It was nicely charred but not really cooked. So eGulleteers, I need your thoughts. Do I par-steam or simmer & then grill? Should I more fully cook with water before grilling? Should I do the steaming before or after splitting the artichoke? Something else?

And yes, these were full size globe artichokes and I know I can adjust the time depending on size.

Edited by JFLinLA (log)
So long and thanks for all the fish.
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Couple of celery sticks, a bay leaf, a garlic clove, and onion sliced, and into the water of a large pot. Then the steamer insert, then the groomed artichokes. I used to steam them with all the leaves on. Now, I cut off the top 1/3, dig out the choke with a rounded small spoon, pull off all the leave, cut off the stem, so I end up with what is officially called the "artichoke bottom medallion".

These I steam until just fork tender. Shock in ice water to stop the cooking after draining them.

Then I whip up some white wine, red wine vinegar, tarragon, chervil, S&P, and chopped red onion or shallots or scallions.

Cook down until almost no liquid. Whip up an appropriate amount of egg yolks, dump in the reduction, whip like crazy over low heat until the mixture begins to thicken (no double boilers for me....too slow).

THen I add clarified non-salted butter, until I get the consistency and taste I'm looking for. A sprinkle of more tarragon and a smidgeon of cayenne.

Microwave the artichoke medallions, and ladle on lots of bearnaise sauce.

Yum! Just ate 4 medallions like this a few days ago.

AND....if I can get really fresh crab meat, I will pulverize it in the food processor, put it in a clean dish towel, squeeze out the moisture (important tip...took me years before I figured out how important this step was), and then incorporate into the bearnaise sauce.

EVEN more YUM than without the crab meat.

doc

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We're well into artichoke season here in sunny California.  The other night, we had a delicious grilled artichoke at a restaurant.  It was dressed simply with olive oil, lemon juice and some nice crunchy salt.  I've always steamed or simmered artichokes but this seemed simple enough to make at home: trim, peel the stem, slice vertically, remove the choke, add a little olive oil & salt, & grill.  Well, that didn't work.  It was nicely charred but not really cooked.  So eGulleteers, I need your thoughts.  Do I par-steam or simmer & then grill?  Should I more fully cook with water before grilling?  Should I do the steaming before or after splitting the artichoke?  Something else?

And yes, these were full size globe artichokes and I know I can adjust the time depending on size.

Yes, you should steam them first. (I feel boiling them leaches out too much of the flavor.)

- Lop off the top 1/4, and trim the pokey parts off the remaining leaves w/ scissors.

- Spread the leaves and rinse well.

- Steam upside-down 'till al dente (if you're going to grill them); split in half and remove choke.

- Oil, salt, and grill.

I'm fortunate to live in the Monterey Bay area, near Castroville. My local farmers' market sells artichokes that can be the size of cantaloupes; unfortunately, I think those giant globes have very little flavor. Bigger isn't always better.

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My local farmers' market sells artichokes that can be the size of cantaloupes; unfortunately, I think those giant globes have very little flavor. Bigger isn't always better.

I agree. Those globe artichokes are very watery-tasting. I've also found that even the smaller thornless artichokes suffer from the same problem.

I do tend to microwave my artichokes. Not only is it easier but the flavor is more concentrated.

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  • 3 years later...

For my steamed artichoke tonight I served it with Meyer lemon juice, argan oil, black pepper, and malha heena (red salt). The beautiful large crystals of malha heena on the side.

I am about as fond of hollandaise as anyone, however I do not feel hollandaise goes well with artichokes. Artichokes, in my opinion, go best with a simple acid and oil, rather than an egg based sauce.

There is a question I have about steaming vs. boiling. I do not often prepare artichokes, but I get better results steaming rather than boiling. However one of my sources, the Time Life The Good Cook Vegetables volume, has an austere injunction: "Do not steam." Anyone know why this would be so? What is bad about steaming artichokes?

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For my steamed artichoke tonight I served it with Meyer lemon juice, argan oil, black pepper, and malha heena (red salt). The beautiful large crystals of malha heena on the side.

I am about as fond of hollandaise as anyone, however I do not feel hollandaise goes well with artichokes. Artichokes, in my opinion, go best with a simple acid and oil, rather than an egg based sauce.

There is a question I have about steaming vs. boiling. I do not often prepare artichokes, but I get better results steaming rather than boiling. However one of my sources, the Time Life The Good Cook Vegetables volume, has an austere injunction: "Do not steam." Anyone know why this would be so? What is bad about steaming artichokes?

I steam mine - better yet - steam them in the pressure cooker - done in no time!

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The other day I was thinking that I had never seen a fully bloomed artichoke before...

So I see some activity on this thread and I figured we needed to see how gorgeous this seldom seen in bloom flower really is

http://www.handmadecharlotte.com/more-visual-inspiration-from-vegetables/

http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Artichoke_Flower.jpg

Just gorgeous!

Wawa Sizzli FTW!

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Artichokes ,

Camping last year near Roscoff in France,

At the unlikely named resto 'Martha Stewart' I enjoyed a very large artichoke lunch, stuffed with 'Pentoncles ' in a cream sauce, the side was very savoury but I have no idea what it was composed of.

This year I will try the 'Facon 'Kig ha Farz'.

All to be had for €13.50.

Great service, great food.

IMG_0332 (2).JPG

IMG_0331 (2).JPG

IMG_0330 (2).JPG

Edited by naguere (log)

Martial.2,500 Years ago:

If pale beans bubble for you in a red earthenware pot, you can often decline the dinners of sumptuous hosts.

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Petoncles = scallops, for those not in the know, and 'kig ha farz' is a Breton dish of boiled meat and a buckwheat stuffing/dressing on the side.

ETA: It looks like your side dish could be the buckwheat 'farz', naguere. Was it with a bacon and shallot sauce? That is the usual accompaniment. I lived in Brittany but never tried this specialty, although I love to find out about regional food; I'd like to know what it tastes like.

It looks like you had a great holiday! I have happy memories of camping in that part of the world.

Edited by Plantes Vertes (log)
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Well, the Farz was very savoury, soft and pleasant to eat, the dressing was creamy, that's all I can remember, oh and sitting their I had a sea view with a small island on the horizon.:)

Martial.2,500 Years ago:

If pale beans bubble for you in a red earthenware pot, you can often decline the dinners of sumptuous hosts.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Naguere, I looked at the little scallops, but saw, of all things, mini marshmallows. Yark! (Where's the green barfy guy?)

I love artichokes steamed with lemon butter, but the scallops sound WONDERFUL !

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"Commit random acts of senseless kindness"

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  • 2 months later...

I tend to do the same two dips for my artichokes - home made aioli and champagne vinaigrette. Now I'm going to have to try some of things mentioned in this thread. I don't know why it never occurred to me to do the artichoke(s) in the pressure cooker! We happened to have them with hors d'oeuvres last evening:

image.jpg

The canapés are crisp crostini with Avocado & Cypress Grove Purple Haze Goat Cheese, and Charlie Trotter's Citrus Smoked Salmon & Creme Fraiche & Salmon Roe.

Question: What do you all do with the lovely artichoke bottoms that are left over?

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  • 1 year later...

And of course I am sure you must be aware that it will be difficult to find a wine to go with. That's the only thing I dislike about artichokes. It ruins the taste of wines. By the way if anyone had any suggestions to get around this problem in some way, please let us know...

 

After my thorough experiments last night, I would suggest more wine.

 

Seriously, I don't find artichoke ruins the taste of wine, although I would choose an acidic white wine, not red.  I wonder if there is something in artichokes that some people can taste and not others, much as some people can taste thiourea and some people can smell metabolites of asparagus?

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I steam for 45-60 minutes depending on how long it takes to get tender. If I'm feeling adventurous, some bay leaf, celery and a splash of vermouth go in the steaming liquid. Most times I'm not feeling adventurous.

 

I serve with my dad's hollandaise recipe and nothing else. I don't think artichokes need anything else. Actually they barely need the hollandaise, though I do love it!

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We were in California last week, and since this is really the "heart" of artichoke season, we partook in quite a few. Drove to Pescadero and had artichoke soup at Duarte's Tavern. Admired the artichokes at the Ferry Building Plaza Farmer's market, and even though I thought I took a picture of them, I didn't.  

 

I like 'em steamed too.  As a matter of fact, here's a story and a recipe...

 

In California, A is for...Carciofi 

Edited by weinoo (log)
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Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

Tasty Travails - My Blog

My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs

Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

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  • 3 years later...

The market  over the border in France had baseball sized Spanish grown artichokes for 1.80 Euros per kilo. I have never seen them that cheap. There are about 8-10 artichokes per kilo. 

 

Now what to do with them? I am looking to branch out from the old standby of steam, roast, fry or grill and them plucking it leaf by leaf with some mayo or other dipping sauce. Any other creative ideas out there?

 

Thanks!

 

Dan

"Salt is born of the purest of parents: the sun and the sea." --Pythagoras.

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1 hour ago, liuzhou said:

Have you seen this topic?

Yes. It has been several years since it was commented on and I did not feel like digging up and flogging a dead horse. 

"Salt is born of the purest of parents: the sun and the sea." --Pythagoras.

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I just made a Marcella Hazan recipe fit for spring.

 

Clean up the artichokes so you have just the hearts then quarter them.  Sautee with peas, shredded lettuce and leeks (and garlic).  Serve over pasta.  

 

Or even just sliced artichoke hearts over pasta topped with some Parm.

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