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Artichokes


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While in California a short time ago, visited Rutherford Grill in the wine country.

We had wonderful artichokes. They had been halved and, I believe, smoked or grilled over a wood fire, but am not sure.

So now I've bought some at the grocers in hopes of replicating that dish. What does everyone suggest?

Parboil or bake before putting on the Webber? Baste?

Any other favorite cooking suggestions, other than boiling?

Favorite accompaniment suggestions?

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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Oooooooooh.

Don't get me started.

For a quick bunch of ideas, check out anything by Mario on the FN site.

"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

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Oooooooooh.

Don't get me started.

Please, Jin... please get started. :biggrin:

If you really like artichokes, you must have one or two faves!!!

Please?

I swear I'll check out Mario as soon as I have more time.

:smile:

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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Some ideas:

you could stuff them creole style -- with a stuffing of seasoned rice and chopped shrimp, tomatoes and onions. stuff each leaf, and also the center. you could mix chopped artichoke hearts with the stuffing. serve with a mustard dip.

if the artichokes are young or baby versions, try splitting them in half and coating them in tempura batter, then deep fry them.

those are two that come immediately to mind.

Galatoire's in New Orleans, serves an eggs benedict variation using sliced artichoke hearts, topped with poached eggs and draped with hollandaise sauce, all on top of an English muffin (or rusk?).

SA

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Artichoke and chicken. Can't go wrong.

To grill artichokes, boil or steam them first. Just until the bottoms pierce easily, or you can pull off a petal. Drain, cool, clean. Marinate in something nice for at least an hour. Perhaps oil, balsamico, shallots, garlic. Then put them cut side down on the grill until lightly browned on the cut side, mebbe 5 minutes. Turn them leave until the tips are charred, about another 5 minutes.

"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

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I like using baby artichokes. Basically cut off all the leaves, pare it down the to stem and the heart. Slice really think and saute in some olive oil. Serve this with some blanched asparagus and fava beans with simple olive oil and lemon. Divine.

And of course I am sure you must be aware that it will be difficult to find a wine to go with. That's the only thing I dislike about artichokes. It ruins the taste of wines. By the way if anyone had any suggestions to get around this problem in some way, please let us know...

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I make a caper dip to serve with artichokes...

Caper Dip

1/2 Cup mayo - either homemade or good-quality store bought

1 clove garlic, mashed and minced

1 tbls small capers

1tbls caper brine

Combine all and allow to sit for flavors to meld.

:smile:

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Hi jaymes,

One very easy way I enjoy preparing chockes is a half cooked and half raw brushetta.

I take my chockes and turn them down to the bottom,remove the chock and peel the stem,put in acidulated water.

Take half of the chockes and toss them in olive oil,kosher salt,fresh milled black pepper a little chili flakes,fennel frongs and some whole garlic cloves.

Then stand them in a cassarole (stems up) and pour the remaining stuff from the bowl over them,tent with foil and roast at 350 degree's for about 35 minuts or till just tender.Remove and let cool.Brush your bread with some evoo and grill,then place of a sheet pan.

take the raw chockes from the water and pat dry,slice them papar thin and drizzle a touch of lemon juice,S&P and evoo.then slice your cooked chockes the same way and gently toss with the raw ones,adjust the seasoning,slice a little fennel bulb,and chop some kalamata olives and add to your vegetables,make a mound of this on your brushetta,top with dry asiago and run under the broiler until the cheese melts and becomes bubbly. I think you'll find the mouth feel of the cooked and raw chockes very pleasing

Turnip Greens are Better than Nothing. Ask the people who have tried both.

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Hi jaymes,

One very easy way I enjoy preparing chockes is a half cooked and half raw brushetta.

I take my chockes and turn them down to the bottom,remove the chock and peel the stem,put in acidulated water.

Take half of the chockes and toss them in olive oil,kosher salt,fresh milled black pepper a little chili flakes,fennel frongs and some whole garlic cloves.

Then stand them in a cassarole (stems up) and pour the remaining stuff from the bowl over them,tent with foil and roast at 350 degree's for about 35 minuts or till just tender.Remove and let cool.Brush your bread with some evoo and grill,then place of a sheet pan.

take the raw chockes from the water and pat dry,slice them papar thin and drizzle a touch of lemon juice,S&P and evoo.then slice your cooked chockes the same way and gently toss with the raw ones,adjust the seasoning,slice a little fennel bulb,and chop some kalamata olives and add to your vegetables,make a mound of this on your brushetta,top with dry asiago and run under the broiler until the cheese melts and becomes bubbly. I think you'll find the mouth feel of the cooked and raw chockes very pleasing

Wow. That sounds positively orgasmic.

Thanks!

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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Artichoke and chicken. Can't go wrong.

To grill artichokes, boil or steam them first. Just until the bottoms pierce easily, or you can pull off a petal. Drain, cool, clean. Marinate in something nice for at least an hour. Perhaps oil, balsamico, shallots, garlic. Then put them cut side down on the grill until lightly browned on the cut side, mebbe 5 minutes. Turn them leave until the tips are charred, about another 5 minutes.

Jin,

Thanks for your prompt response. I had promised my mom & dad grilled artichokes for my mom's 85th birthday tonight, so was up against a time factor here. I did what you said and they turned out great. Also, Maggie, made your caper sauce which was also delicious (and easy).

The other recipes sound absolutely wonderful as well...the one with blanched asparagus (another favorite) and fava beans, and stuffed, Creole style. I love artichokes and have a whiskey half-barrel on my condo deck where I grow them, so needed some new ideas.

Really appreciate y'all coming through for me!

Thanks again.

:smile:

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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I am so excited about these great artichoke ideas! I hope they keep coming even though the party is over.

Here are some simple ideas:

I have had good luck with Alice Waters' grilled artichoke method. Use baby artichokes, pare down to the tender leaves, trim the tops & stems, and cut in half. (This takes a while so I keep them in a lemon-juice/h2o mix.) Drain them, them marinate 1 hour in olive oil to cover with a bit of salt and pepper added. I think the soak in the oil is what makes it work. I skewer them and put them on a medium-low grill for about 10-15 mins, checking often. They are wonderful! I want to do a parboiled version to compare, but this method makes for a very smokey, meaty side dish, or an addition to salads or pastas.

For plain, steamed artichokes, I have started serving beurre monte to dress them up a bit. I suspect that you are all familiar with this simple sauce. I have just discovered it and adore it. There is a recipe at the following link:

http://www.foodtv.ca/contests/inniskillin/...es/recipe_2.asp

You can do a lovely raw artichoke salad (clean babies as above or use full sized and pare down to the heart). Slice them thinly, and toss with arugula or shave radicchio. Dress with shallot vinaigrette and top with lots or thinly sliced parmesan. Bitter and delicious!

Marcella Hazan also has a fab recipe for artichoke risotto. A classic, but lovely.

I am looking forward to trying some of the other ideas. Thanks!

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  • 1 month later...

Trader Joe's had a big bunch of baby artichokes on sale today. I'm contemplating risotto or maybe frying them a la Judea, but other than that I'm drawing a blank.

Suggestions for preparation would be greatly apprecated!

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Braise them with olive oil and white wine (some chopped shallot is nice, too). You might want to split them and trim out the choke, first. One good thing about braising artichokes is that if you use too much liquid (as I did), you've got the base for a wonderful purée of artichoke soup (purée leftover artichokes and some potatoes cooked in the braising liquid, strain, thin with cream -- voilà!) Good hot or cold.

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Braise them with olive oil and white wine (some chopped shallot is nice, too).  You might want to split them and trim out the choke, first.  One good thing about braising artichokes is that if you use too much liquid (as I did), you've got the base for a wonderful purée of artichoke soup (purée leftover artichokes and some potatoes cooked in the braising liquid, strain, thin with cream -- voilà!)  Good hot or cold.

Thanks, I'll give it a go. :biggrin:

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The babies dont have much of a heart for harvesting, so I would probably whack the suckers in half, salt and pepper, pour a ton of olive oil on em, and throw em in the broiler. Instant appetizers. Peel the leaves off one by one and pull the meat off with your teeth.

http://www.foodtv.com/foodtv/recipe/0,6255...5,22666,00.html

Jason Perlow

Co-Founder, The Society for Culinary Arts & Letters

offthebroiler.com - Food Blog | View my food photos on Instagram

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I buy those at TJ's all the time - they're great. You can braise them as Suzanne has suggested ( I add basil, mint, garlic, diced peeled tomato and chili pepper to mine) or try them raw. Clean, peel and julienne, and toss them with with a lemon/basil vinaigrette over your choice of greens with lots of shaved reggiano. Instead of the greens, I've also served them over beef or tuna, carpaccio style, garnished with the vinaigrette, parmesan and capers. The contrast between the crunchy bitterness of the chokes v.s. the buttery quality of the meat is quite wonderful.

We need to find courage, overcome

Inaction is a weapon of mass destruction

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I buy those at TJ's all the time - they're great. You can braise them as Suzanne has suggested ( I add basil, mint, garlic, diced peeled tomato and chili pepper to mine) or try them raw. Clean, peel and julienne, and toss them with with a lemon/basil vinaigrette over your choice of greens with lots of shaved reggiano. Instead of the greens, I've also served them over beef or tuna, carpaccio style, garnished with the vinaigrette, parmesan and capers. The contrast between the crunchy bitterness of the chokes v.s. the buttery quality of the meat is quite wonderful.

We need to find courage, overcome

Inaction is a weapon of mass destruction

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  • 1 year later...

almost always, i just trim artichokes, steam until a bottom leaf is slightly loose, and serve with butter and lemon wedges. :wub:

but i've also had tempura'd (battered) articoke hearts, and i love the bottled, Italian marinated ones in salad, or solo.

i have never tried one of the preparations where the leaves are stuffed--while the artichoke is still whole--with breadcrumbs/forcemeat, etc.

how do you like them? any ideas?

thanks in advance,

gus

"The cure for anything is salt water: sweat, tears, or the ocean."

--Isak Dinesen

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