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Hoagies, Cheesesteaks, Pork Italiano


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First, broccoli rabe was "Impossible!"

Now, he's unsure of crispy, rich, delicious pork cracklins? Full speed ahead, and damn the torpedoes, say I! Customers will catch up: when have Americans ever minded salty, crispy pork products, anyway?

If only it were so. People like their bacon nice and crispy, but (except for the BLT and its derivatives), they many have trouble when soft (roast pork) and crisp (pork skin) are together in the same bite.

Bob Libkind aka "rlibkind"

Robert's Market Report

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I will read backas far as I can in the brief time I have but quick help will be appreciated! Leaving rittenhouse area shortly for airport & want to take "the best" hoagie with me for in-flight dining. Extra points for messy and odiferous;-)

Judy Jones aka "moosnsqrl"

Sharing food with another human being is an intimate act that should not be indulged in lightly.

M.F.K. Fisher

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While this won't do anybody much good at 7am, and you're probably thru the security line by now (9:45,) here's a pretty good, recent list.

http://www.philly.com/inquirer/food/200906..._favorites.html

It must be nice to have interns at the radio station making food runs all over the Delaware Valley.

I will read backas far as I can in the brief time I have but quick help will be appreciated!  Leaving rittenhouse area shortly for airport & want to take "the best" hoagie with me for in-flight dining.  Extra points for messy and odiferous;-)

Charlie, the Main Line Mummer

We must eat; we should eat well.

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While this won't do anybody much good at 7am, and you're probably thru the security line by now (9:45,) here's a pretty good, recent list.

http://www.philly.com/inquirer/food/200906..._favorites.html

It must be nice to have interns at the radio station making food runs all over the Delaware Valley.

Slave labor still exists in the United States of America. They're called interns.

Edited by Rich Pawlak (log)

Rich Pawlak

 

Reporter, The Trentonian

Feature Writer, INSIDE Magazine
Food Writer At Large

MY BLOG: THE OMNIVORE

"In Cerveza et Pizza Veritas"

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I just had the best roast pork sandwich for lunch today at Pallante's Italian Deli in Richboro. They make them with mounds of freshly roasted lean pork (white meat only) with either broccoli rabe or spinach and of course the requisite sharp provolone. They also add the long hots which I really enjoyed. They put extra au jus in a little plastic cup for takeaway which I found really thoughtful. Finally, all of this is built on a lightly toasted sesame seed Sarcone's roll, perfection I tell you.

Reading about Phil A's roast pork at Porchetta in NYC and his statement that this rivaled Tony Luke's, I thought can't be...The sandwich I had today at this little deli in Richboro just might have been better than the venerable TL's.

I've lived in the area (Holland) for 12 years and just got around to trying it today. Believe it or not, there is a Primo's in the same center that I've been going to... no more. This blows primo's away.

Pallante's Italian Deli

130 Almshouse Road

Store 207

Richboro, PA

215 364-9750

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A couple of Philly sandwich-related links.

First, Serious Eats gives a shout-out to the Philly Surf n' Turf, the beloved hot dog/fish cake combo. They argue it's a kosher inspiration. Click.

And the good news: Playboy has named a cheesesteak as one of its best sandwiches in America. The bad news: it's the cheesesteak from Pat's. I'm sorry, but no amount of implants and airbrushing will bring that sorry sandwich into the winner's circle. Probably NSFW link below:

I read it for the articles

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A couple of Philly sandwich-related links.

First, Serious Eats gives a shout-out to the Philly Surf n' Turf, the beloved hot dog/fish cake combo.  They argue it's a kosher inspiration.  Click.

And the good news: Playboy has named a cheesesteak as one of its best sandwiches in America.  The bad news: it's the cheesesteak from Pat's.  I'm sorry, but no amount of implants and airbrushing will bring that sorry sandwich into the winner's circle.  Probably NSFW link below:

I read it for the articles

Playboy also doesn't know from pastrami. The article says Katz's makes pastrami from brisket! Corned beef, yes. But pastrami is from navel! The writer probably ordered his on white bread with mayo.

Bob Libkind aka "rlibkind"

Robert's Market Report

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A couple of Philly sandwich-related links.

First, Serious Eats gives a shout-out to the Philly Surf n' Turf, the beloved hot dog/fish cake combo.  They argue it's a kosher inspiration.  Click.

And the good news: Playboy has named a cheesesteak as one of its best sandwiches in America.  The bad news: it's the cheesesteak from Pat's.  I'm sorry, but no amount of implants and airbrushing will bring that sorry sandwich into the winner's circle.  Probably NSFW link below:

I read it for the articles

Playboy also doesn't know from pastrami. The article says Katz's makes pastrami from brisket! Corned beef, yes. But pastrami is from navel! The writer probably ordered his on white bread with mayo.

So what's your take on the "pastrami cheesesteak?"

Dum vivimus, vivamus!

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  • 2 weeks later...

I didn't see it in a quick run thru today's print edition, but the Inky on-line has a piece about a new cheesesteak book.

I'm not buying several of the 25 things I don't know, but I was amused by 25.

Here's what somebody posted in the reply section - "al sharpton would be doing cannonballs at valley swimclub before dylan offered someone an autograph for no reason."

On a (sorta) related note, I'm planning to check out the new Elevation Burger joint in Wynnewood today or tomorrow.

Charlie, the Main Line Mummer

We must eat; we should eat well.

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A couple of Philly sandwich-related links.

First, Serious Eats gives a shout-out to the Philly Surf n' Turf, the beloved hot dog/fish cake combo.  They argue it's a kosher inspiration.  Click.

And the good news: Playboy has named a cheesesteak as one of its best sandwiches in America.  The bad news: it's the cheesesteak from Pat's.  I'm sorry, but no amount of implants and airbrushing will bring that sorry sandwich into the winner's circle.  Probably NSFW link below:

I read it for the articles*

*So did my mom!

Funny, isn't it, that this is probably the only territory on Earth where the Prince outranks the King?

However, I wouldn't dismiss this sandwich out of hand; it's mediocre, true, and Pat's has been resting on its laurels for some time, but it still has character, which is more than I can say for the place on the other side of Cheesesteak Corner. There all the character is supplied by the owner, not the sandwiches.

Sandy Smith, Exile on Oxford Circle, Philadelphia

"95% of success in life is showing up." --Woody Allen

My foodblogs: 1 | 2 | 3

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From Forbes Traveler article on America's Best Stret Foods":

Cheesesteak-serving stands are all over Philadelphia but are especially concentrated in the area of University City. One favorite of students and tourists alike is Abner’s at 38th and Chestnut Streets.

Yeah, I always think of University City when I'm looking for a cheesesteak???

Holly Moore

"I eat, therefore I am."

HollyEats.Com

Twitter

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Yeah, that is weird, it's actually quite hard to find a good cheesesteak in University City, I can't imagine how this writer came to the conclusion that they're "especially concentrated" there. Sure, there are some carts, and some take-out joints, but none of them are especially noteworthy, nor are they more densely-packed than anywhere else in the city.

Back in prehistoric days, when Abner's was new, I liked their cheesesteaks pretty well, and loved the "criss-cut" wafffle fries. And the Italian Hoagies.

But the last time I was in there, which is a couple of years now, I got a truly vile steak, it was dry and greasy, and a little funky. But that very well may have been a fluke, I was creeped-out enough by that one that I haven't been back, so I can't say how they are in general.

"Philadelphia’s premier soup dumpling blogger" - Foobooz

philadining.com

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And if you don't like the street food tips from Forbes, you can always try Fortune, WSJ or Business Week. :wacko:

As reliable as Playboy's cheesesteak "reporting" up thread!

From Forbes Traveler article on America's Best Stret Foods":
Cheesesteak-serving stands are all over Philadelphia but are especially concentrated in the area of University City. One favorite of students and tourists alike is Abner’s at 38th and Chestnut Streets.

Yeah, I always think of University City when I'm looking for a cheesesteak???

Charlie, the Main Line Mummer

We must eat; we should eat well.

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  • 4 weeks later...

And in this corner, the Nick's Special from Nick's Charcoal Pit at 13th and Snyder. charcoal grilled filet, spinach and cheese on Sarcone's seeded bread.

gallery_14_105_3415.jpg

Hot Dog - a combo with whiz and bacon - is kinda great too.

gallery_14_105_4116.jpg

Thinking now that the hot dog might be superfluous. A Whiz and bacon sandwich could be the ultimate non-vegan sandwich.

Holly Moore

"I eat, therefore I am."

HollyEats.Com

Twitter

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I learned about Nick's Charcoal Pit from Hawk Krall first on Facebook and then following his link to Drawing For Food

If you haven't happened upon Hawk's work, he does terrific hot dog illustrations for Serious Food.

Edited by Holly Moore (log)

Holly Moore

"I eat, therefore I am."

HollyEats.Com

Twitter

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I learned about Nick's Charcoal Pit from Hawk Krall first on Facebook and then following his link to Drawing For Food

If you haven't happened upon Hawk's work, he does terrific hot dog illustrations for Serious Food.

Yep, that was it! And I'll second the recommendation of the hot dog art: I started following Hawk Krall's blog after seeing (and linking, up above) this excellent illustration of a Philly surf n' turf combo.

Also, how great of a name is "Hawk Krall?" God, I'm jealous.

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Also also, the governor of grease stains himself, Mr. Holly Moore, gave a brief interview to the City Paper's Meal Ticket blog a couple of days ago, dropping some knowledge about Philadelphia restaurant history and what the Philadelphia food scene needs now.

(hint: rhymes with "not frogs")

Edited by Andrew Fenton (log)
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Also also also, I had what was just about the best hoagie of my life last week at Chickie's. It's a new sandwich that they'd posted in the window: Italian tuna, prosciutto, artichokes, olive spread and balsamic vinegar. The tuna gives it body, the prosciutto richness, the artichokes a bit of vegetable sweetness, olives for salt and the balsamic just ties it all together into something that's just amazing.

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  • 2 weeks later...
And in this corner, the Nick's Special from Nick's Charcoal Pit at 13th and Snyder.  charcoal grilled filet, spinach and cheese on Sarcone's seeded bread.

gallery_14_105_3415.jpg

Hot Dog - a combo with whiz and bacon - is kinda great too.

gallery_14_105_4116.jpg

Thinking now that the hot dog might be superfluous.  A Whiz and bacon sandwich could be the ultimate non-vegan sandwich.

Also also also also, I tried Nick's the other day. I wanted to like the filet sandwich, I really did! But it just didn't taste like much. Granted, they're not exactly going to be featuring wagyu on an $8 sandwich, but even so, I didn't get a lot of beef flavor or grill flavor, for that matter. I think there's a reason why filet isn't the standard cut for sandwiches. I'd rather have a roast beef Italiano, or a cheesesteak, for that matter.

But I did really like the couple of bites of hot dog I had. And there are a lot of other things on the menu that I'd like to try.

Edited by Andrew Fenton (log)
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