Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Key Lime Pie


UkFoodie
 Share

Recommended Posts

Made a key lime pie over the weekend in the attempt to fast forward to summer.

There was a syrypie slime between the lime curd and meringue. This has never happened before....

I appliend the meringue when the curd was stilll hot... The slime appeared after i let it cool to room temp. (admittedly it was about 4 hours, but 4 cool hours. I was finishing it off as 6 am)

Anythoughts?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think in the Pie and Pastry Bible, there are recipes that call for using a very thin slice of sponge cake between the curd and meringue to soak up any seepage. The width is 1/8" I think, so it's difficult to tell there's anything there. I've never tried it, but it sounds like it might work. If you don't have a sponge, maybe some soft cake crumbs would do the trick.

Good luck. I don't even do meringue toppings any more b/c they're so tempermental.

Marjorie

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't usually put meringue on Key Lime Pie...

I prefer whipped cream prepared thusly: add to taste some sugar, Meyer's rum, and a dash of vanilla (although you don't really need vanilla with the rum; I just enjoy adding it). Sometimes I use Captain Morgan's spiced rum.

I whip the cream and flavorings together and hold them in a separate container in the fridge. And then serve the pie with a just-added generous dollop of the rum-cream on top.

We like the pie quite tart, so I make the whipped cream fairly sweet to balance.

Edited by Jaymes (log)

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I never put meringue on a Key Lime Pie....just on a Lemon Meringue, but that has never happened to me.  How do you make the base?

I'm assuming that when you say base you mean curd?

To make the lime curd, in the top pan of a double boiler or in a nonreactive saucepan, whisk together the eggs, egg yolks, sugar, milk and salt until blended. Then whisk in the lime juice. Set the top pan over but not touching simmering water in the bottom pan, or set the saucepan over medium-low heat. (If using a saucepan, take care not to heat the mixture too quickly.) Cook, stirring constantly with a wooden spatula or spoon, until the mixture is warmed through, 1 to 2 minutes.

Begin adding the butter a little at a time, stirring each addition until blended before adding more. Continue cooking, stirring constantly and scraping the bottom of the pan, until a finger drawn across the back of the spatula leaves a path, 8 to 10 minutes more. Immediately remove the pan from the heat. Pass the curd through a chinois set over a nonreactive bowl and let cool to room temperature.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I agree with the general consensus of not putting a meringue on a key lime pie. There are few things I'm irrationally strict about in the world of food, but Key Lime Pie is one of them, here is a link to a recipe for "REAL" Key Lime Pie--accept no substitute! :)

http://www.gourmetsleuth.com/recipe_keylimepie.htm

And only use real key lime juice, bottled or fresh, and don't ever add food color to make it green!!! :raz:

It's not the destination, but the journey!
Link to comment
Share on other sites

just because you dont like meringue on key lime doesnt mean thats why your getting the slime.

Its the egg whites breaking down ontop. It is best to put the meringue ontop after it cools. The put the pie back in the oven to toast/crispen the outside of the meringue and keep it from breaking down.

It's possible you whippe the egg whites too much and they will seperate leaving a very dry airy top with egg white debris below.

If you only put a thin layer (less than an inch-and a half) ontop you can easily torch it.

Though in rebudtle to my first statement its more common to have whipped cream ontop of key lime than merignue, but its entirely up to the person.

Just a little add on, were talking about key lime CURD i do beleive and not key lime PIE so lets not get confused and jump at the sight of KEY LIME + Meringue. With meringue it goes just as well as whipped cream.

Edited by chiantiglace (log)

Dean Anthony Anderson

"If all you have to eat is an egg, you had better know how to cook it properly" ~ Herve This

Pastry Chef: One If By Land Two If By Sea

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Key limes aare smaller with a more mellow tartness. You can approximate key lime with regular lime and sugar but it doesn't quite amount to the same thing. I like a maringue top on my key lime pie, although mostly I am too lazy to get there. I did achieve it once by getting the pie really really cold in the frige and then spread a 1/2 inch layer of eggwhites and torch it with a blow torch

Ya-Roo Yang aka "Bond Girl"

The Adventures of Bond Girl

I don't ask for much, but whatever you do give me, make it of the highest quality.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes, I meant the curd when I said base. I also make it similarly to you but there are other recipies that do not require cooking or eggs that use condensed milk.

Key limes are indigenous to the Florida Keys but are similar to limes found in Mexico. They are mild and delicate and different than the Persian (dark green) limes we find most often in the States.

Edited by ldubois2 (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

What's the difference in flavour between a key lime and a normal lime? I'm quite intrigued by this all-america pie, and would likt to try but, alas, only normal limes in icy Copenhagen....

Key/Mexican limes do have a different flavor from the large Persian limes. The Key/Mexican limes are smaller, with a slightly sweeter, more complex flavor. The Persian limes are mainly just sour.

But there are several companies that bottle the Key/Mexican limes, most famously in the US, this one:

Nellie & Joe's Key Lime Juice.

I'd think that you might be able to find it in a specialty food shop in Copenhagen. Or order it online.

More info on limes, their taste and origin.

And more.

It appears from these websites that limes originated in India and Southeast Asia. It does seem likely you could find a source in Europe to order bottles of the juice.

Edited by Jaymes (log)

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

although sometimes bottled citrus juices have that nasty metallic aftertaste, in which case I'd just use regular old limes from the grocery store, which many people actually prefer over key limes in blind tastings, quite counterintuitively.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

When a meringue "breaks" like that it's usually due to humidity. Try using an Italian (cooked sugar syrup) meringue, which is the most stable.

I have to agree that Key Lime pie is far better naked or with just whipped cream.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Also another good thing people like to do is, if your using "curd" that is, to fold whipped cream into the curd and then set it up in the crust. That gives a much lighter texture which i like at lot.

Dean Anthony Anderson

"If all you have to eat is an egg, you had better know how to cook it properly" ~ Herve This

Pastry Chef: One If By Land Two If By Sea

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Also another good thing people like to do is, if your using "curd" that is, to fold whipped cream into the curd and then set it up in the crust.  That gives a much lighter texture which i like at lot.

Yeah, I usually fold in about 3/4c whipped cream to an 8 yolk curd, and then chill it for about 2 hours before piping it into tart shells. That way it has just enough body to stand up higher than the tart shell while still retaining a smooth surface.

Edited by Sethro (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Your quite right, because what happens is that the sugar coats the air bubbles in the merignue in which makes them strronger, oil/fat creates a similar effect, and as the air breaks down, if the structure is not secured by dehydrating/cooking the egg then the sugar will slip down from egg whites because the surface area it aquired is depleting.

Try making a french meringue and let it sit in the fridge, uncovered for a few days. It will seperate and the remaining foamy eggs with have dried out and feel like crusty clouds.

Dean Anthony Anderson

"If all you have to eat is an egg, you had better know how to cook it properly" ~ Herve This

Pastry Chef: One If By Land Two If By Sea

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 year later...

Here's the story:

I'm having a barbecue on Saturday, for about 50 people. For dessert, some friends have requested my key lime pie. I'm looking to make it in mini form, like little tarts, since it would be awkward to bake pies, and serve them to 50 people. I'm also making mini lemon blueberry cheescakes, from an old standard family recipe.

I usually make the key lime pie with egg yolks, then the beaten whites folded in, it makes them very light, but I'm afraid it wouldn't hold up, in cupcake liners. Is there any way to make this foamy chiffony mix a little more sturdy? I'm looking for something that's equally good, yet wouldn't be a hassle to eat, at a barbecue.

Barring that, anyone have any suggestions on the easiest and neatest way to serve pie to 50 people? I also considered making it in a sheet pan, into squares, but again, I think the filling would be too fluffy.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I used to make a Three layer key lime chiffon pie and for the chiffons stability I would add maybe 3 sheets of bloomed gelatin to the mix.

Because we were selling so many, I would prepare enough chiffon for 6 pies at a time, at least.

and "whip it up as needed. It was very light

I was just rummaging around for the recipe but I don't think I copied it.

However, it seemed to be that bottled 'Joes' key lime juice and sugar, melt bloomed gel in a small amount of key lime mix., add back in to rest of chiffon mix,

Let set until gelled 1.2 loose /1/2 sturdy, then whip it with stand mixed or Hand ( getting out any lumps.

Spatula on with a small spat, as piping might make you loose all of that fine volume

This should work for you

Good Luck

Edited by tan319 (log)

2317/5000

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The gelatin is a great idea, but I'm not sure I could find it in sheets, or even what to look for. Would they have that at a grocery store? Or what kind of specialty store could I find it at? I've never worked with it before.

Lime mousse sounds good, a great variation. Piping seems like a fast, decorative way to go, though the texture would probably be really different than the fluffy voluminous whippy chiffon that my normal recipe is. It would be a great understudy though. Does anyone have a recipe, if I can't get my hands on some gel sheets by the end of the week?

Edit: Thanks for the input, so far!

Edited by Lilija (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sur La Table sells mini tarts made by Bakehouse which are good...you could just fil them. Ina Garten's recipe for key lime pie is a no bake ...just freeze them and serve

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I make key lime curd and keep it in the freezer. When I need to make tarts, I thaw it (you could use it fresh, of course) and mix it with sweetened, condensed milk. Works really well.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think this one looks promising.

http://www.floras-hideout.com/recipes/reci...Lime_Pie_Cooked

The egg yolks are cooked via a double boiler so there should be no danger of contamination. Then instead of using the egg whites, I would used whipped cream.

Then you could order some tart shells like these:

http://www.auiswisscatalogue.com/store/mer...WEETTARTLSHELLS

Edited by patsikes (log)

Patrick Sikes

www.MyChocolateJournal.com

A new chocolate review community

PS I Love You Fine Chocolates

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Not a recipe, but a serving idea. My child is graduating from college on Saturday and we are having pseudo-Mexican for 75 on Sunday to celebrate. She requested Key Lime Pie. I am going to do Key Lime Shooters. Our local party store sells plastic shooter cups (probably double size - about 4 inches tall and as big around as a half dollar). I will layer graham cracker/butter mixture, key lime custard and whipped cream in the cups. Everyone will get a shooter and a spoon. I figure that each one holds about 1/2 a slice of pie. I am also serving brownies.

Kim

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...