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Reading Terminal Market (Part 1)


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I'm surprised no one's yet mentioned that O.K. Lee has white flesh peaches on sale for $0.99/lb.

The sign states they're from Lancaster County, but this week, the peaches had little Jersey Fruit Cooperative PLU stickers on them.

Sandy Smith, Exile on Oxford Circle, Philadelphia

"95% of success in life is showing up." --Woody Allen

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I'm surprised no one's yet mentioned that O.K. Lee has white flesh peaches on sale for $0.99/lb.

The sign states they're from Lancaster County, but this week, the peaches had little Jersey Fruit Cooperative PLU stickers on them.

well, that's why you're here! i mean, the topic doesn't say 'what bob found on his latest visit,' although he is the main man on the topic.

although seriously you gotta wonder about that. if they're ready to put up an incorrect sign about peaches at the height of peach season (when peaches from jersey are no worse than those from lancaster), what other kinda b.s. are they pulling?

still, good kimchi.

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[...if they're ready to put up an incorrect sign about peaches at the height of peach season (when peaches from jersey are no worse than those from lancaster), what other kinda b.s. are they pulling?

Do I dare eat a peach, no matter from whence it came?

Bob Libkind aka "rlibkind"

Robert's Market Report

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Actually, I'm not gonna bust O.K. Lee's chops on not changing his sign when he changed the source of his peaches (last week's peaches did not have those stickers on them, so I will assume they came from where the sign said they did).

Besides, if truth be told, what mrbigjas said: The good stuff is of identical quality whether it was grown in Lancaster County or Cumberland County.

Sandy Smith, Exile on Oxford Circle, Philadelphia

"95% of success in life is showing up." --Woody Allen

My foodblogs: 1 | 2 | 3

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Actually, I'm not gonna bust O.K. Lee's chops on not changing his sign when he changed the source of his peaches (last week's peaches did not have those stickers on them, so I will assume they came from where the sign said they did).

Besides, if truth be told, what mrbigjas said: The good stuff is of identical quality whether it was grown in Lancaster County or Cumberland County.

Seinfeld said it best, "produce is a gamble." Even peaches grown at the same farm purchased at the same stall have varied from week to week this year.

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The white jersey peachs are usually only out for a short time around here and this years crop is suppose to be very sweet because of the dry summer and so much sun this growing season. So grab a bunch and enjoy cause the wont be around for long.

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  • 2 weeks later...

The Fairmount market was brimming with lots of good things today, as well as a new (to me) vendor, Cressley Greenhouses & Produce Farm. I'll let these photos speak to some of the variety:

gallery_7493_1206_447755.jpg

Summer and fall veggies at Livengood's

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Cressley's peppers, eggplants and tomatoes

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Sam and his apples (and Earl's concord grapes, too)

In addition to Brandywine and German stripped tomatoes, I picked up corn, peaches, canteloupes and, a special treat, apples from Sam Conslyman's tree. The smaller of the apples held by Sam is most likely a winesap relative. I ate a small one immediately after bring it home, and it was crisp and flavorful, sweet enough but not overpowering. The other apple appears to be a relative of Delicious, either a forebear or a cousin; it's huge, but I haven't tasted it yet.

Sam took a walk by his local waterway near Lancaster this morning to check on the Paw Paw trees. He spotted the first fruit to drop, though it still wasn't quite ready. (Paw Paws are harvested after they drop; the art is to gather them before any critters do.) He expects they'll be peaking in 2 to 3 weeks.

Bob Libkind aka "rlibkind"

Robert's Market Report

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A sure sign of fall: apple cider. Benuel Kaufman says he'll have it starting this Thursday at his Reading Terminal Market stall.

I ate that big apple Sam Consylman sold me last Thursday. Definitely a Delicious on steroids, though with more flavor and slightly less sugar that those mealy Washington State examples. If I was going to give an apple to a teacher, this would be the one.

On Monday, Sept. 25., the market hosts the "Local Food Expo," sponsored by the Fair Food Project. A similar event was held last spring for the restaurant and food supply industry, but this fall's event will be open to the public from 4 to 6 p.m., giving us mere consumers a chance to meet more than 20 family farmers and food producers from the region, showing and offering samples of the goods they offer.

Next week (Thursday, Sept. 21) the monthly "Producers Corner" program will be "Indian Summer" with samples to taste of tomato and corn salad, peach cobblers, plum tarts and sangria.

Some of the new cases are ready to be installed at Charlie Giunta's new natural meat store. There's a lot of work to be accomplish quickly if he's to make his goal of opening before the end of the month.

No way will Hershel's deli be open before the Jewish high holydays; although design work is complete the vendor still needs permits from the city's Health and L&I departments. Until that happens, Spataro's stays put. LeBus, however, figures on beginning construction of its new stand this month.

Blackberries were briefly availble at Benuel Kaufman's this past Saturday morning ($2.95 per half pint), but by the time I left the market at 11:15 they were gone. That's probably it for the season. Lots of Barlett pears at $1.49/pound. White peaches and green and colored bell peppers sold for $1.99, prune plums for $2/pint.

Over at Iovine Brothers, local green peppers featured at 50 cents/pound, but all the colored varieties (none local) priced at $3.99. Local Gala apples also two pounds for a buck, local eggplant 79-cents a pound. Another sign of autumn, pomegranites $1.99 apiece. Hass avocados $1.99 (vs. $1.49 at O.K. Lee). Black figs $2.99/pint, red and green seedless grapes 99-cents, red globe, black seedless and muscatine grapes $1.99. Looking at my receipt I noticed that it offerd a 10 percent discount at the Down Home Diner; Jimmy Iovine said he's had that offer for months.

Also offered at O.K. Lee, orange and yellow cauliflower at 99-cents a head. Excellent cactus pears still 79 cents apiece.

Edited to fix days of Sept. 21 and 25 events

Edited by rlibkind (log)

Bob Libkind aka "rlibkind"

Robert's Market Report

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Speaking of Sam, I bought some beautiful little peppers from him last week: some are red, some are yellow, and they are all about an inch long. He explained that they're called "fish peppers" (and showed me the seed company blurb about them). They're a true Philadelphia product. The breed was grown originally by African-Americans in Philadelphia area, and were used to season fish and shellfish: hence the name. I haven't yet cooked with them, but intend to cook up some fish in the next day or so.

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Wouldn't one of those butchers over at the Italian Market have bunny?  (What do I know?? :wacko: )

yeah, several of them do--sonny d'angelo carries it, and i'm pretty sure orlando's does. esposito's i'm not as sure about, but they do have a lot of stuff there.

but andrew asked about the terminal...

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New t-shirts at the Down Home Diner for sale. One bright red shirt is emblazoned with: "I icon12.gif Bacon", another with "Eat More Scrapple".

To accompany some pork, apple cider is ideal. Benuel Kaufman has the unpasteurized, unfiltered variety. I bought a quart today for $2.25. If you've never had it (and don't have a serious immune system disorder), get yourself some. It's a rare seasonal treat.

A fish I've rarely seen before at the RTM: Yellow Pike, $14.99/pound for filets at John Yi's. They also had halibut filet on special at $10.99.

O.K. Lee had a good deal on limes, a bag of about eight for 99 cents, and bags of about half a dozen lemons at the same price. (Iovine's was selling the limes at 5 for a buck, lemons 3 for a buck.) Other good deals at O.K. Lee included mixed colored peppers (red, green,yellow) at 99 cents for a two-pound bag, 79 cents for all greens. Lancaster County Bartlett pears, 99 cents for a 1-1/2 pound bag. Red cabbage, 39 cents.

Pepper survey at Iovine Brothers: Reds and Greens 99 cents, Oranges and Yellows $3.99. About six varieties of eggplants, with prices at 79 cents for the local purples and going up from there. Hass avocadoes back down to a dollar apiece. The chantarelles looked particularly good this morning, but as pricey as ever at $34.99. Small black radishes, $2.49/pound.

Would you believe pumpkin pie flavored coffee? UGH! But Spice Terminal had it among its flavored coffees today.

More cases delivered and partially installed at the new Giunta's butcher shop; they still have a long way to go if they intend to open this month.

Bob Libkind aka "rlibkind"

Robert's Market Report

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Would you believe pumpkin pie flavored coffee?

You know, I'm not a coffee drinker, but my sister is, and she's quite a coffee snob, but she said that pumpkin pie flavored coffee really is quite delicious and my non coffee snob boyfriend agrees. When she comes to visit she'll usually bring him a bag of pumpkin pie coffee beans.

Believe me, I tied my shoes once, and it was an overrated experience - King Jaffe Joffer, ruler of Zamunda

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Needed a quick Philly experience for an out-of-town friend, and a Hoagie seemed like the right thing. The line was too long at Salumeria, and I've been wanting a Carmen's hoagie for a while now, so we hit Carmen's.

gallery_23992_3603_78335.jpg

Any questions about who makes their rolls?

gallery_23992_3603_21605.jpg

I opted for a special italian, whcih was great, just the right balance of elements for my taste.

gallery_23992_3603_8057.jpg

My friend was intrigued by the grilled chicken with broccoli rabe and fresh mozzerella, apparently he doesn't see sandwiches quite like this in SanFrancisco. He loved it...

gallery_23992_3603_24251.jpg

The terminal was jumping mid-day saturday, with huge crowds everywhere, but the line wasn't bad at Carmen's, and we got our sandwiches in about 10 minutes, not bad, considering... Really good hoagies, and worth the wait.

"Philadelphia’s premier soup dumpling blogger" - Foobooz

philadining.com

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The terminal was jumping mid-day saturday, with huge crowds everywhere, but the line wasn't bad at Carmen's, and we got our sandwiches in about 10 minutes, not bad, considering...  Really good  hoagies, and worth the wait.

yeah what was UP with that place yesterday? i didn't see tons of out-of-towners with convention badges and bags, and yet it was as packed as i've seen it in months. months!

i don't know why i can't get it together to go in the morning before work and avoid this annoyance; with this baby around i'm up at like six everyday.

edited to add: at livengood's this week, both at the terminal and the fairmount farmers market that bob goes to: PAWPAWS. if you see these things again, get them. i got a few on thursday, one i had to let ripen till saturday evening but the other was ready right then. imagine a fruit that has a texture like a soft banana, and tastes somewhere between a banana and a mango maybe, and ... flan. yeah i said flan. it's got a custardy, butterscotchy, almost smoky flavor to it. my god they're good. i keep meaning to buy a couple more and make something out of them, but i've been unable to stop myself from just busting into them and scarfing them down. which is a messy proposition. let them ripen till the skin is mostly brownish grey for best flavor--you'll be able to smell them from ten feet away at that point.

Edited by mrbigjas (log)
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Would you believe pumpkin pie flavored coffee?

You know, I'm not a coffee drinker, but my sister is, and she's quite a coffee snob, but she said that pumpkin pie flavored coffee really is quite delicious and my non coffee snob boyfriend agrees. When she comes to visit she'll usually bring him a bag of pumpkin pie coffee beans.

I find adding *any* artificial flavors to coffee repugnant! Why ruin someething so good with artificial chemical flavors? I won't add artificial whiteners to it, either.

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Needed a quick Philly experience for an out-of-town friend, and a Hoagie seemed like the right thing. The line was too long at Salumeria, and I've been wanting a Carmen's hoagie for a while now, so we hit Carmen's.

gallery_23992_3603_78335.jpg

Any questions about who makes their rolls?

gallery_23992_3603_21605.jpg

I opted for a special italian, whcih was great, just the right balance of elements for my taste.

gallery_23992_3603_8057.jpg

My friend was intrigued by the grilled chicken with broccoli rabe and fresh mozzerella, apparently he doesn't see sandwiches quite like this in SanFrancisco.  He loved it...

gallery_23992_3603_24251.jpg

The terminal was jumping mid-day saturday, with huge crowds everywhere, but the line wasn't bad at Carmen's, and we got our sandwiches in about 10 minutes, not bad, considering...  Really good  hoagies, and worth the wait.

I've always considered the Special Italian from Carmen's (nee Rocco's) to be the finest example of the art of the hoagie ln Philly. It IS all about the balance of every ingredient. Perfection.

Rich Pawlak

 

Reporter, The Trentonian

Feature Writer, INSIDE Magazine
Food Writer At Large

MY BLOG: THE OMNIVORE

"In Cerveza et Pizza Veritas"

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