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jogoode

Great canned tomatoes

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jogoode   

I was walking through Grand Central Market last week and spotted some canned San Marzanos with a "D.O.P" on the label. The can was almost $5. This was the first time I've seen the "D.O.P" on cans in New York, though I haven't paid much attention until recently. I assume I can get canned San Marzanos at good Italian specialty shops -- Di Palo's, Buon Italia -- but I'd love to know your experiences.

So, where can I find real canned San Marzanos, or any other high-quality canned tomatoes? Where are they the cheapest?


JJ Goode

Co-author of Serious Barbecue, which is in stores now!

www.jjgoode.com

"For those of you following along, JJ is one of these hummingbird-metabolism types. He weighs something like eleven pounds but he can eat more than me and Jason put together..." -Fat Guy

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docsconz   

I just bought some this weekend at Putnam Market in Saratoga. They were about the same price. They aren't cheap! I wonder if this summer's crop are starting to hit the stores?


John Sconzo, M.D. aka "docsconz"

"Remember that a very good sardine is always preferable to a not that good lobster."

- Ferran Adria on eGullet 12/16/2004.

Docsconz - Musings on Food and Life

Slow Food Saratoga Region - Co-Founder

Twitter - @docsconz

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Liz B-F   

The 35 ounce can of San Marzanos from BuonItalia in my cupboard was $1.95....but it doesn't have D.O.P. on label...not that I can find.

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Moopheus   
They aren't cheap! I wonder if this summer's crop are starting to hit the stores?

I suppose the weakening dollar is driving prices up too, like everything else. I just saw some jars of DOP tomatoes for I think $6 each here in Brooklyn. Even non-DOP Italian tomatoes are going for $2-3 a can around here.


"I think it's a matter of principle that one should always try to avoid eating one's friends."--Doctor Dolittle

blog: The Institute for Impure Science

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docsconz   
The 35 ounce can of San Marzanos from BuonItalia in my cupboard was $1.95....but it doesn't have D.O.P. on label...not that I can find.

If it doesn't say DOP on the label it isn't. That does not mean that they aren't good tomatoes, but true DOP San Marzanos are at least a step up from most of the canned competition and even compare favorably to most fresh tomatoes.


John Sconzo, M.D. aka "docsconz"

"Remember that a very good sardine is always preferable to a not that good lobster."

- Ferran Adria on eGullet 12/16/2004.

Docsconz - Musings on Food and Life

Slow Food Saratoga Region - Co-Founder

Twitter - @docsconz

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jogoode   
The 35 ounce can of San Marzanos from BuonItalia in my cupboard was $1.95....but it doesn't have D.O.P. on label...not that I can find.

If it doesn't say DOP on the label it isn't. That does not mean that they aren't good tomatoes, but true DOP San Marzanos are at least a step up from most of the canned competition and even compare favorably to most fresh tomatoes.

Only recently did learn that D.O.P. on the can means it's the real thing. I had always wondered why the San Marzanos I was buying weren't inspiring. I bought some fake San Marzanos -- "packed in San Marzano" -- at Fairway the other day. They were $1.67 a can -- I'll report on them once I try them. I often use Scalfani crushed tomatoes, which if you add enough butter taste pretty good.


JJ Goode

Co-author of Serious Barbecue, which is in stores now!

www.jjgoode.com

"For those of you following along, JJ is one of these hummingbird-metabolism types. He weighs something like eleven pounds but he can eat more than me and Jason put together..." -Fat Guy

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Forgive me, but could someone please explain what D.O.P. stands for?


If you can't act fit to eat like folks, you can just set here and eat in the kitchen - Calpurnia

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jogoode   

Denominazione d'Origine Protetta. Basically, it indicates that the labeling of the product is subject to regulations that are supposed to ensure that you get what's advertised with regards to the origin of the product. You see this designation often on cheeses and wines (when it's DOC, Denominazione di Origine Controllata). I'm sure many of you can explain it more precisely than that, so please do!

Edited to add DOC info.


Edited by jogoode (log)

JJ Goode

Co-author of Serious Barbecue, which is in stores now!

www.jjgoode.com

"For those of you following along, JJ is one of these hummingbird-metabolism types. He weighs something like eleven pounds but he can eat more than me and Jason put together..." -Fat Guy

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jogoode   
I just bought some canned San Marzano DOP's at DiPaolo's yesterday - $2.79 for a 28 oz. can...says 2004 crop on the can.

Whoa! Good deal. Thanks, Weinoo. What is the brand? If you use them, please let us know how they are.


JJ Goode

Co-author of Serious Barbecue, which is in stores now!

www.jjgoode.com

"For those of you following along, JJ is one of these hummingbird-metabolism types. He weighs something like eleven pounds but he can eat more than me and Jason put together..." -Fat Guy

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Denominazione d'Origine Protetta. Basically, it indicates that the labeling of the product is subject to regulations that are supposed to ensure that you get what's advertised with regards to the origin of the product. You see this designation often on cheeses and wines. (I'm sure many of you can explain it more precisely than that, so please do!)

Thank you!

From this site.

Acronym DOP (Denomination of Protected Origin) identifies the denomination of a product whose production, transformation and elaboration must have place in a geographic area determined and characterized from one recognized and stated skill.

Edited by jogoode (log)

If you can't act fit to eat like folks, you can just set here and eat in the kitchen - Calpurnia

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Moopheus   
I just bought some canned San Marzano DOP's at DiPaolo's yesterday - $2.79 for a 28 oz. can...says 2004 crop on the can.

Whoa! Good deal. Thanks, Weinoo. What is the brand? If you use them, please let us know how they are.

I was just in there and they had Pastaso DOP for $2.79 and La Valle DOP in kilo cans for $2.49. Considering the non-DOP cans were still around $1.99, that's not much markup at all for the DOP cans.

Now if it were possible to actually check out of Di Palo's in less than twenty minutes...


"I think it's a matter of principle that one should always try to avoid eating one's friends."--Doctor Dolittle

blog: The Institute for Impure Science

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jogoode   
I was just in there and they had Pastaso DOP for $2.79 and La Valle DOP in kilo cans for $2.49. Considering the non-DOP cans were still around $1.99, that's not much markup at all for the DOP cans.

Now if it were possible to actually check out of Di Palo's in less than twenty minutes...

Thanks! I've heard great things about La Valle.


JJ Goode

Co-author of Serious Barbecue, which is in stores now!

www.jjgoode.com

"For those of you following along, JJ is one of these hummingbird-metabolism types. He weighs something like eleven pounds but he can eat more than me and Jason put together..." -Fat Guy

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pennbrew   
This gentleman used to be a barber in the city and had the tomatoe business on the side but now just imports tomatoes.  Check out his website.

http://www.sanmarzanoimports.com/

I've bought these several times and have liked them, however after reading this thread I checked the cans and they do not say "D.O.P."

So are they or aren't they?

---Guy

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docsconz   

If they do not say so they aren't. I didn't see any indication on the website that the tomatoes are DOP.


John Sconzo, M.D. aka "docsconz"

"Remember that a very good sardine is always preferable to a not that good lobster."

- Ferran Adria on eGullet 12/16/2004.

Docsconz - Musings on Food and Life

Slow Food Saratoga Region - Co-Founder

Twitter - @docsconz

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jogoode   
Can someone tell me where DiPaolo's is? I would love to pick up some tomatoes. Thanks.

Di Palo's is at the corner of Grand and Mott.


JJ Goode

Co-author of Serious Barbecue, which is in stores now!

www.jjgoode.com

"For those of you following along, JJ is one of these hummingbird-metabolism types. He weighs something like eleven pounds but he can eat more than me and Jason put together..." -Fat Guy

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Fat Guy   

In my opinion the best deal you can get on high-quality Italian canned tomatoes is at Teitel Brothers on Arthur Avenue. A gigantic can of Francesconi brand tomatoes -- 6 lb 9 oz -- is $3.99. They are not San Marzano but they are very good, grown and packed in Italy. The 35 oz cans are $1.39 and a case of 12 cans is $15.50.


Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
Co-founder, Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, sshaw@egstaff.org
Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code
Director, New Media Studies, International Culinary Center (take my food-blogging course)

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Fat Guy   
I've bought these several times and have liked them, however after reading this thread I checked the cans and they do not say "D.O.P."

So are they or aren't they?

---Guy

The San Marzano Imports site is full of ambiguity and wiggle words. For example, on the home page there's a link to a certification document that, if you read it, means little. There is lots of talk about San Marzano tomatoes and how great they are, but nary a mention of the DOP concept. Articles about San Marzano tomatoes in general -- as opposed to this particular brand -- are cited as testimonials.


Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
Co-founder, Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, sshaw@egstaff.org
Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code
Director, New Media Studies, International Culinary Center (take my food-blogging course)

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Moopheus   
A gigantic can of Francesconi brand tomatoes -- 6 lb 9 oz -- is $3.99. They are not San Marzano but they are very good, grown and packed in Italy.

Yes, it's worth noting here that while DOP San Marzano tomatoes are nice to have when you can get your hands on them at a good price, it doesn't necessarily mean that other canned tomatoes are bad; in fact they may be perfectly good, and those 3-kilo cans are often quite cheap for what you get.


"I think it's a matter of principle that one should always try to avoid eating one's friends."--Doctor Dolittle

blog: The Institute for Impure Science

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rich   
The 35 ounce can of San Marzanos from BuonItalia in my cupboard was $1.95....but it doesn't have D.O.P. on label...not that I can find.

If it doesn't say DOP on the label it isn't. That does not mean that they aren't good tomatoes, but true DOP San Marzanos are at least a step up from most of the canned competition and even compare favorably to most fresh tomatoes.

Only recently did learn that D.O.P. on the can means it's the real thing. I had always wondered why the San Marzanos I was buying weren't inspiring. I bought some fake San Marzanos -- "packed in San Marzano" -- at Fairway the other day. They were $1.67 a can -- I'll report on them once I try them. I often use Scalfani crushed tomatoes, which if you add enough butter taste pretty good.

Why on earth would you add butter to Italian gravy? The only places that do this are those commercial restaurants that cater to the uninformed such as the Don Peppe's and the clones - La Parma, etc.


Rich Schulhoff

Opinions are like friends, everyone has some but what matters is how you respect them!

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jogoode   
Why on earth would you add butter to Italian gravy? The only places that do this are those commercial restaurants that cater to the uninformed such as the Don Peppe's and the clones - La Parma, etc.

It make such an amazing sauce! The recipe is from a Marcella Hazan cookbook.


JJ Goode

Co-author of Serious Barbecue, which is in stores now!

www.jjgoode.com

"For those of you following along, JJ is one of these hummingbird-metabolism types. He weighs something like eleven pounds but he can eat more than me and Jason put together..." -Fat Guy

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rich   
Why on earth would you add butter to Italian gravy? The only places that do this are those commercial restaurants that cater to the uninformed such as the Don Peppe's and the clones - La Parma, etc.

It make such an amazing sauce! The recipe is from a Marcella Hazan cookbook.

I'm sure it tastes fine and I should have guessed it was a Hazan recipe. However, she doesn't cook real Italian, at least in my opinion. She's more of an American-Italian icon.


Rich Schulhoff

Opinions are like friends, everyone has some but what matters is how you respect them!

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slkinsey   
Why on earth would you add butter to Italian gravy?.

It make such an amazing sauce! The recipe is from a Marcella Hazan cookbook.

I'm sure it tastes fine and I should have guessed it was a Hazan recipe. However, she doesn't cook real Italian, at least in my opinion. She's more of an American-Italian icon.

Marcella Hazan?! :shock: Have you read her books? She is anything but an icon of America-Italian food. Her Essentials of Classic Italian Cooking is considered the definitive English language cookbook on Italian cooking.

I'm also not sure where you get the idea that butter and tomato in a pasta condiment isn't Italian. There is a very large area of Italy for which butter is the traditional lipid of choice. In fact, I would assert that there are many pasta sauces that cannot be properly made without using butter.

I'm asking this with all due respect and out of curiosity: what is your basis for thinking that Hazan's recipes aren't "real Italian?" You've spent a lot of time in Italy cooking? Again, I mean no disrespect in asking this. It's just that I have spent a lot of time in Italy cooking, and her recipes seem plenty Italian to me. In re to the butter/olive oil thing, my perspective on this may have to do with the fact that I have spent a large percentage of my time in there in areas "on the border between butter country and olive oil country."


Samuel Lloyd Kinsey

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