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what desserts to serve


Suvir Saran
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Suvir, I know you like your sweets. But I'd rather finish with just some strong chai and perhaps another bit of paratha or naan.

"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

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You sure do not like sweet I see.. another bite of paratha or naan... not for me Jinmyo.. but to each their own...

I do love sweets.. and live for  them... if all things considered.. I had to choose one food group.. I would choose desserts.

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Ice cream or sorbet in a "tropical" fruit flavor would be appropriate.

So would oeufs a la neige, I realized tonight, when I had it for dessert at Tournesol,  a new French bistro in Queens.  (My husband said it reminded him of ras malai.)  Not exactly.

What is needed, I think, is something soothing and cool.

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Of course.  My elitist Bengali nature got the better of me and I assumed that every one knew what we like to eat:)

Anyway, for the those who have not been fortunate enough.

Rabri is to all intents and purposes  condensed milk.  it is made by boiling whole milk ( with sugar I think )  until it forms a skin and then moving that to the side of the pan and continuing to boil until the next skin forms and moving that to the side.  this process is continued until all that is left is a thick sweet 'cream" which is wonderful with pistachio

Mishti Doi is a yoghurt and in calcutta, it is served in small earthenware pots which are tossed aside when it is finished.  One of my abiding memories is the sight of these pots littering the streets.

both of these are creamy and delicious and totally Bengali.  I suspect they are too sweet for may other tastes.

Paan is a betel nut wrapped in Betel leaf which is placed in the side of the mouth like chewing tabaco.  It is taken after a meal ( in fact at any time ) and helps aid digestion.  Some people add tabaoo and in fact it has been seen as a cause of mouth cancer.  The non toxic one is rather good although I have not had one in about six months

S

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I'll second the Sorbet idea.  I'm not sure I've ever seen a cuisine that didn't go with Sorbet.

Maybe from WAY out in left field... Pecan Pie.  I'm not sure why, but I can see it working after many Indian dishes.

Jon Lurie, aka "jhlurie"

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I think Pecan Pies work very well.. the gooeyness of a good one, the nuts and the molasses in some versions of the pie from the mid-west lend themselves very well with Indian foods.

I second that.  And of course, sorbets are great.  Almost astringent if made with the right fruits.  

What else??

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  • 8 months later...
Are there any desserts that go well with Indian food that are better than others?

Anything non Indian maybe?

What are the favorites here?  

Or are Kulfis, Kheer, Gulab Jamuns etc.. the only answer?

I often serve:

1. Mango Cheesecake

2. Granny Smith Apple Kheer

3. A lovely and velvety KHubani meeta or Apricots and cream

Yum!

Monica Bhide

A Life of Spice

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Are there any desserts that go well with Indian food that are better than others?

Anything non Indian maybe?

What are the favorites here?  

Or are Kulfis, Kheer, Gulab Jamuns etc.. the only answer?

I often serve:

1. Mango Cheesecake

2. Granny Smith Apple Kheer

3. A lovely and velvety KHubani meeta or Apricots and cream

Yum!

How do you make your mango cheesecake? Is the recipe in the book?

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What about Phirni (Rice Pudding)

Rich with cardamom and sprinkled with almonds and pistachios :wub:

I make this often using a recipe from Madhur Jaffrey, Ia m drooling now just thinking about it!

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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What about Phirni (Rice Pudding)

Rich with cardamom and sprinkled with almonds and pistachios  :wub:

I make this often using a recipe from Madhur Jaffrey, Ia m drooling now just thinking about it!

I love phirni. Divine when made well.

Every trip to New Delhi I make my pilgrimage to Karims in Old Dehi (near Jama Masjid) and while friends eat the meat preparations, I partake in several servings of Phirni.:rolleyes:

Now I am drooling as well. :raz:

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What about crepes, with a variety of different toppings? Last night we had crepes with chocolate sauce, cherry sauce and an orange sauce.

Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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That sounds really interesting. Did you serve anything with the pears? Creme fraiche or by themselves? I wonder what other fruits you might be able to do that with....

Just plain, this time. Either rabri or creme fraiche would have been divine. Any fruit can be poached, but I like poached pears best. In France, at this time of year, every restaurant offers them for dessert an they are different every time. The saffron-rose water flavoring worked very well. Depending on the spices, the pears take on a different character. It's best to use Bosc pears, which are very firm and continue to hold their shape long emough to allow the long poaching that allows the flavors to penetrate.

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I once roasted some figs in a tandori oven-glazed them lightly with honey and lemon-cooked them until they almost burst,and served them with kulfi.I would say take the good basic custards of India,and serve them with fruit;raw,roasted,etc.

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