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percyn

Breakfast! The most important meal of the day (2004-2011)

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Having enjoyed reading about what people's dinner creations at Dinner! Topic, I thought we could do the same for breakfast !!

So, feel free to post what you made for this important meal of the day !!

Cheers

Percy


Edited by percyn (log)

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OK, so what do you make when you have some farm fresh, organic, hermone free, free range eggs, Russian caviar and truffles in your pantry? Why...boiled eggs (soft and hard), topped with caviar, accompanied with truffle butter toasts, of-course !!

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Hint: If you want perfect looking non-gray yolks in your boiled eggs, make a small hole on the larger end the egg, taking care to just go through the shell, but not puncture the egg's membrane. This will allow air from a natural pocket to escape and not press the iron into the egg yolk.

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This post gave me a big chuckle...I just finished MY breakfast...a bowl of leftover Neua pad bai kaprao from lunch yesterday. I love it so much, I can't wait for Sunday breakfast so I can have the leftovers.

percyn, your breakfast looks much more civilized! Beautiful photos, thanks for sharing.

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:laugh: Well it's not what I usually eat, but around 6 this morning I had leftover green salad from last night. And I just ate a piece of cheese to tide me over until lunch.

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I made a nice moussaka yesterday late afternoon. Got up this morning, and the thought of those fried potatoes resting under the eggplants, red wine meat mixture, and the nicely carmelized bechamel was too much to resist!

I no more than finished, and the wife who slept late got up and went straight for the fridge and heated up a dish for her too!

A special breakfast on a very special day, our 36th anniversary!

doc

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I had what I think of as an Italian fry-up. In a non-stick frying pan, melt some bacon fat. When its melted and sizzling a bit, put a thick slice of tomato cut in half into the pan and cook for a few minutes, until brown around the edges, turning a few times. When they are done to your liking, add 2 eggs. Top with a few torn basil leaves, locatelli, and black pepper. Cover and cook to your desired doneness. Coincidentally, I like mine cooked just as long as it takes to get a nice piece of bread brown and toasty.

Truly, the breakfast of champions.

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Soft-boiled eggs over strips of buttered sourdough toast with crumbled bacon sprinkled over the top (plus salt and freshly-ground pepper, of course). Still working on getting the timing on the eggs just right. :hmmm:

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An asiago cheese bagel with smoked salmon cream cheese...my Sunday staple. Tomorrow I will scramble 2 egss with the salmon cream cheese.

Oh yeah, no Fall or Winter morning is complete without a soy mocha with whipped cream.

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We had potato pierogi fried with some italian sausage, onions, and cabbage and topped with sour cream. We split a leftover apple turnover for "dessert".

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Yesterday I ate leftover chicken wings for breakfast.

Today, some sausage, an apple and a hunk of cheddar cheese.

Both days, about 5 cups of coffee along with. But that goes without saying.

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I had 3 hot dogs. :sad: I guess I win the prize for trashiest breakfast. :laugh:

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Leftover Venison Sirloin slow--cooked with cabbage and pitabread, and Earl Grey tea. Hoisin sauce used for the slow-cooking.

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Let's see...hotdogs...venison sirloin....hot dogs....venison sirloin. Just can't decide who I hope will invite me to breakfast to save me from my cereal and fruit with Soymilk. :rolleyes:

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I can make that easier on you Richard. I can just cook up some more and have you and Ling both to put a feed on. I have been wanting some green curry pork as well, and I recall Ling likes that...boy, am I glad my appetite is coming back!!!

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Smoked salmon omelet, sliced tomato, and cream cheese piled on a toasted sesame bagel with OJ & two cups of very hot coffee. :wub:

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Soft-boiled eggs over strips of buttered sourdough toast with crumbled bacon sprinkled over the top (plus salt and freshly-ground pepper, of course). Still working on getting the timing on the eggs just right.  :hmmm:

Lexica,

Have you tried an egg timer (the one that is heat sensitive, changes color to indicate state of egg and goes into the water with the eggs)? I also find that putting the eggs in gently boiling water for 4 minutes gives me a good soft boiled egg.

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Brunch did turn out to be more breakfast than lunch. I used leftover chicken to make chicken hash and a fried egg, and enjoyed it on the porch even though it is a rainy day.

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Light and Fluffy Pancakes from Cooks Illustrated "The Best Recipe." In fact, they are too light for me as written and I put 2-3 tbs whole wheat flour in the measuring cup and then complete with the AP flour. So far my favorite from-sratch pancake recipe.

I made my daughter's chocolate chip and came up with this method to avoid the melted chocolate on the skillet: Pour the pancakes and sprinkle on the chips, then dab on a bit of batter on each chip before turning each one.

Any improvements on the above method welcome.

And Smucker's Light syrup.

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rice pudding (left over) with raisins and cream

&

grapefruit juice

&

coffee


Edited by ludja (log)

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I didn't have anything at all this morning, but yesterday, I had reheated Japanese karee raisu, made oatmeal with dried cranberries for the BF, and gave his son a lesson on making French toast. Weekends are about the only time I cook anything for breakfast as we need to be out the door by 7:30 a.m. and I am not a morning person.

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Egg white omlette with chedar and smoked ham....and of-course a starbucks coffee.

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Liverwurst sandwich with onions, spicey mustard, mayo, and fried onions on a flax seed roll. Perfect easy way to start the day.

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