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Abra

Exotic Orange Cake

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Thats why I said "silly question" :raz: .Any way I have noticed that Patrick's cake doesnt have any lines /wrinkles on top like the other one posted previously,I suppose the plastic wrap cause the wrinkle and I was wonder how did Patrick manage to get a smooth surface like that.

I will also use a spring form pan I think it would be easyer to deal with .


Vanessa

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Ahh never mind that , I have just read all the previus post ( i print the long one cause I didnt have time and I have read them on my break , and ofcourse you can build the cake on layer as I used to do while back ,freezen each layer inside a 8in round pan ,easy enough for me :biggrin: Sorry


Vanessa

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FWED   

Hi Desiderio. The reason I wrote the recipe as it is, with the gelee layer inserted later, is because the original cake that I made from the original World Pastry Forum class recipe called for the Bavarian cream layer to be sprayed with white chocolate.

The cake is fabricated without the gelee layer and is frozen. It is then taken out of the freezer and sprayed with a mixture of 50% white chocolate and 50% cocoa butter. This gives the outside of the finished cake a velvet finish and provides a little bit of crunch when eating. The gelee is then poured into the reserved space. This makes a very neat, tailored presentation. I personally like the look of the sprayed white chocolate.

If you are not going to spray the outside of the cake then you could make the gelee ahead of time and build the cake around it. Its all a matter of personal taste.

I am presently working on a variation in the presentation of this cake and hope to have some photos of it soon. Fred


Fred Rowe

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Thank you FWED, I really like the look of the sprayed chocolate it gives the cake a neat look indeed.

This cake is very intriging ( spelling?), and I really want to try it out.

Thank you for posting so many helpfull tips and hints for this gourgeus cake again :smile:


Vanessa

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Hey, Fred, one of the coolest things about this cake is how well the almond balances it out into your body. It is certainly every morsel a wonderful treat. But the almond meal keeps it from just being a wild rampant sugar rush. There's calories to have to pay for but worth it.

If I ate brownies or regular cake, I would gain weight. It's my wonky metabolism. Your cake with the protein, did not cause me to gain weight though I ate a coupla slices a day for several days.

Looking forward to the update you're working on. And I'm looking forward to making again with all the right ingredients.

:biggrin:

The only thing I didn't try was the choco spraying--I should try that...

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oli   

I am going to make this for our department party and I was wondering if anybody have trouble getting exact egg yolk and egg white weights. I find the eggs are slightly more than the recommended weights.


Edited by oli (log)

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Yeah sure, you just take out a bit to get it on target.

Patrick advised using less whipped cream in the bavaroise--good idea and it's possible next time I will add more sugar for the caramel part called cremeux.

Everytime I say bavaroise I picture Desi Arnaz yodeling BABALOO and banging on the bongo drums :laugh:

How do you pronounce bavaroise and cremeux??

Oli, did you locate the passion fruit??

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oli   

Wow, you remembered my problem. I impressed, because I am not a big poster more of a lurker. Don't get me wrong I am just a lurker here, but not in real life. Well, anyway, I have someone from my department whose family lives in S.F., and when she went for a visit and a side trip to the CIA, I asked if she wouldn't mind stopping in at Dean & Deluca. I had called Purfect Puree and they don't sell to walkins, but Dean & Deluca were the only people in Napa that carried it. There is another place in Culver City that carries Purfect Puree but when I was there they didn't have passion fruit.

Here's a question. When I received the product I noticed that the container says Passion Fruit concentrate, so I am wondering if I should just keep adding concentrate until the gelee tastes right, according to my palate?

I pronounce, bavaroise, as: bavaros


Edited by oli (log)

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Abra   

It's bah-var-waz, with a slight emphasis on the last syllable.

Cremeux is harder to explain. It's crehm----the eux has no exact equivalent in English. In fact, I can't think of a single example - help me out here, someone!

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It's bah-var-waz, with a slight emphasis on the last syllable.

Cremeux is harder to explain.  It's crehm----the eux has no exact equivalent in English.  In fact, I can't think of a single example - help me out here, someone!

How about: crehm-yuh .


John DePaula
formerly of DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

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Abra   

Nope, no y sound in there, no oooo either. The sound doesn't exist in English, I'm pretty sure. Don't we have some new audio capacity here? I could record it.

Wait, listen here! audio file Baveux is the word we'd use for "runny" as in "I'd like my omelette runny." The eux sound is the same as in cremeux.

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I am going to make this for our department party and I was wondering if anybody have trouble getting exact egg yolk and egg white weights. I find the eggs are slightly more than the recommended weights.

No problem. I weigh out my yolks and whites in disposable cups. If I need 8.5 yolks, I put in 9, and then take some out.


"If you hear a voice within you say 'you cannot paint,' then by all means paint, and that voice will be silenced" - Vincent Van Gogh
 

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oli   
I am going to make this for our department party and I was wondering if anybody have trouble getting exact egg yolk and egg white weights. I find the eggs are slightly more than the recommended weights.

No problem. I weigh out my yolks and whites in disposable cups. If I need 8.5 yolks, I put in 9, and then take some out.

What do you think of this product, and would you think it would work in this cake? It is available at Whole Food Markets, so I wouldn't haveto mail order

From their website: Goya.com

Fruit Pulps

In several delicious tropical varieties like Passion Fruit, Papaya, Mango and Tamarind, these frozen fruit pulps are 100% natural, low in fat, high in Vitamin C, and cholesterol free. Used in smoothies and frozen desserts, Goya Fruit Pulps are the key ingredient in tropical treats. And now Fruit Pulps are available in convenient packages with four individually-wrapped, single-use servings.

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I am going to make this for our department party and I was wondering if anybody have trouble getting exact egg yolk and egg white weights. I find the eggs are slightly more than the recommended weights.

No problem. I weigh out my yolks and whites in disposable cups. If I need 8.5 yolks, I put in 9, and then take some out.

What do you think of this product, and would you think it would work in this cake? It is available at Whole Food Markets, so I wouldn't haveto mail order

From their website: Goya.com

Fruit Pulps

In several delicious tropical varieties like Passion Fruit, Papaya, Mango and Tamarind, these frozen fruit pulps are 100% natural, low in fat, high in Vitamin C, and cholesterol free. Used in smoothies and frozen desserts, Goya Fruit Pulps are the key ingredient in tropical treats. And now Fruit Pulps are available in convenient packages with four individually-wrapped, single-use servings.

I've never used Goya fruit pulps, but I don't see any reason why they wouldn't work fine. If they are already sweetened, you might want to adjust the sugar in the gelee recipe according. I used a sweetened puree, so I left out all of the granulated sugar. Just adjust it to taste.


"If you hear a voice within you say 'you cannot paint,' then by all means paint, and that voice will be silenced" - Vincent Van Gogh
 

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Or you can go to:

http://www.onlineconversion.com/

It's easier than doing the math.

...or you can go to google, and type in the Search bar "(xx) ounces in grams", where (xx) is the amount you need to convert. or vice versa.

if this is your first time using this feature, note that it works for currencies, Imperial --> Metric, distances, as well...


"The cure for anything is salt water: sweat, tears, or the ocean."

--Isak Dinesen

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FWED   

I recently decided to try something different with the exotic orange cake by making it in an individual serving size. I recently bought an oval savarins mold made by Demarle. I used the original recipe but limited the cake to just one layer in the finished mini cake. I used the original amount of cream but increased the orange oil to one and one half teaspoons and added the zest of 4 oranges instead of 3 to intensify the orange flavor in the Bavaroise layer. The recipe made 20 of these mini cakes. It worked out very well and was a hit when I served to friends. Demarle has a web site at www.demarleusa.com.

Here are some photos of the mini’s. The mini cakes are on 4 inch gold disks so that will give you an idea of the size of them.

gallery_9087_227_5363.jpg

gallery_9087_227_16042.jpg

gallery_9087_227_45105.jpg


Fred Rowe

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Abra   

I want to add my vote for doing this cake in mini format. The extra sprayed surface gave a crisp edge in practically every bite that was just wonderful, and the additional orange was a good enhancement. Here's the finished presentation

gallery_16307_2558_34633.jpg

Beautiful and delicious. Thank you, FWED!

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I gotta get a sprayer--those are amazing. And orange oil in the bavaroise--I missed that part somewhere.

Umm, y'all are sure the Wagner paint sprayer is food safe??? Is there a comparably priced food one?? Probably not...?

Here's one for $369.

$266

Hmm, then we go into the full size stand alone model$. Geez that fifty dollar Wagner is looking better and better--but what about the food safety issue??


Edited by K8memphis (log)

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k8, if you buy the wagner brand new and don't use it for anything but chocolate, you'll be fine. there are very few moving parts, all of which can be washed before first use. that's the main sprayer you'll find in many restaurants if they do any spraying.

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Cool. The cakes look very attractive in mini savarin shapes.


"If you hear a voice within you say 'you cannot paint,' then by all means paint, and that voice will be silenced" - Vincent Van Gogh
 

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I second Patrick S's comment.

They look very sophisticated in that format. Additionally, I imagine they are easier to handle/serve than when made in a large cake. Either way, I am sure they taste fantastic. Good work! :wink:

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duckduck   

Those turned out really nice Fwed! Now I can't wait to try them out with my square petit four demarle pan. The ovals were a very nice choice.


Pamela Wilkinson

www.portlandfood.org

Life is a rush into the unknown. You can duck down and hope nothing hits you, or you can stand tall, show it your teeth and say "Dish it up, Baby, and don't skimp on the jalapeños."

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