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Pop Rocks


tan319
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Ted,

I did a search way back and came up with a whole bunch of stuff on google. I think it is manufactured in Spain. I'll try and dig it up.

"Chocolate has no calories....

Chocolate is food for the soul, The soul has no weight, therefore no calories" so said a customer, a lovely southern woman, after consuming chocolate indulgence

SWEET KARMA DESSERTS

www.sweetkarmadesserts.com

550 East Meadow Ave. East meadow, NY 11554

516-794-4478

Brian Fishman

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Ted,

I did a search way back and came up with a whole bunch of stuff on google. I think it is manufactured in Spain. I'll try and dig it up.

Thanks Brian!

I did a search but was only coming up with flavors.

2317/5000

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or you can be a real hardass and make your own...but I am unsure of the technique

It requires special manufacturing equipment and is a patented process.

http://science.howstuffworks.com/question114.htm

http://www.delphion.com/details?pn=US04289794__

Jason Perlow

Co-Founder, The Society for Culinary Arts & Letters

offthebroiler.com - Food Blog | View my food photos on Instagram

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If you're talking about the "fizzy sherberts" in some of the desserts in '98/02', I'm not sure they made them.

When I was doing my search I plugged fizzy sherberts in too.

They come from the UK it seems.

I think the process to make them would be kind of difficult, since it involves sugar at about 240f getting gassed with Co2.

But Bicycle ( and anyone else who might be interested), while we're at it, let me run something by you.

I'm toying around with an idea for dessert and I want to carbonate creme anglaise.

Possible?

With a soda siphon?

Like you would use for your own seltzer?

2317/5000

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I'm toying around with an idea for dessert and I want to carbonate creme anglaise.

Possible?

With a soda siphon?

Like you would use for your own seltzer?

I would suspect that would just give you a foam since there is so much fat in the anglaise.

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  • 2 years later...
You have got to love Pop Rocks. Has anyone had any luck trying to make these? A recipe? I've got some fun ideas for flavors but need a little direction on the how-to.

don't know how possible it is to make them at home. there are several sources online for neutral flavored poprocks...

for example: chefrubber

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Alisond,

Pop rocks are harder to make than they appear...I have tried to make them but have failed time and time again. When I did some research on it I found that the equipment involved is very expensive and more elaborate than I thought.

Also you loose alot of the 'rocks' making each batch because the level of gas and temp need to be spot on....and this is coming from the actual pop rocks candy company!

But the Chef Rubber Brand is pretty good, and it takes on flavour pretty well. Also elBulli Texturas Line has some pop rocks.....havent tried them though.

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Alisond,

Pop rocks are harder to make than they appear...I have tried to make them but have failed time and time again. When I did some research on it I found that the equipment involved is very expensive and more elaborate than I thought.

Also you loose alot of the 'rocks' making each batch because the level of gas and temp need to be spot on....and this is coming from the actual pop rocks candy company!

But the Chef Rubber Brand is pretty good, and it takes on flavour pretty well. Also elBulli Texturas Line has some pop rocks.....havent tried them though.

Does anyone have any interesting recipes with them?

Mark

www.roseconfections.com

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yes I sprinkled a bunch on top of home made marshmallows!!!(Nightscotsman's strawberry Marshmallow recipe in the RG) it was hysterical to see people's faces when they ate them!!!

edited because I have never actually tried to make them and just realized you wanted to make the pop rocks not use them ..sorry

Edited by hummingbirdkiss (log)
why am I always at the bottom and why is everything so high? 

why must there be so little me and so much sky?

Piglet 

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yes I sprinkled a bunch on top of home made marshmallows!!!(Nightscotsman's strawberry Marshmallow recipe in the RG) it was hysterical  to see people's faces when they ate them!!!

edited because I have never actually tried to make them and just realized you wanted to make the pop rocks not use them ..sorry

That is where the tread started. I was curious if anyone an interesting recipes using pop rocks, especially with chocolate. I also want to make something fun for my grandkids.

Edited by mrose (log)

Mark

www.roseconfections.com

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I have some of the chefrubber ones but I have yet to figure out any ingenious applications for them. You have to be pretty careful about isolating them from moisture or they will melt. Whatever you incorporate them into needs to be either dry or very viscous. Maybe try folding some into ice cream or ganache or something.

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if i remember correctly, the process of making pop rocks is making a sugar syrup and then jamming carbon dioxide into at at 200lbs per square inch. i don't recommend tryin this at home. before we figured it out we tried with a pneumatic compressor. the result were nasty nasty sugar burns!!!

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I have been playing with the chefrubber product for several months. Pure rocks in the month have a different feel than rocks that are incorporated into a product base. By the time you add enough to really notice it the texture starts to become an issue. As such, I tend to use them as a dry sprinkle most often. Other things I have tried:

1) They work well in chocolate: add after tempering or in a filling.

2) They can be a fun addition to drinks: they do eventual melt but fun on the rim or in a martini

3) I have tried several savory things but nothing I would make a regular: poached quail eggs were ok, but they were not a welcome addition to a mayonaise.

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I was also thinking of ice cream but also savory applications. I STILL want to make them myself. It sounds like there will be some engineering involved. Wouldn't tamarind pop rocks be good with chili-mango ice cream and a thickened horchata cream? What about floating them on something in a soup so when they fall in they do their thing?

How did you incorporate them into poached quail eggs?

A few years back Dairy Queen did a shake that featured pop rocks. The pop rocks were coated in a purple waxy substance that was really gross stuck in your teeth. The wax was just there to preserve their integrity until they got in your mouth, but it was so disgusting. I still ordered it a few times though because it was still an exciting item although it was practically inedible.

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A few years back Dairy Queen did a shake that featured pop rocks. The pop rocks were coated in a purple waxy substance that was really gross stuck in your teeth. The wax was just there to preserve their integrity until they got in your mouth, but it was so disgusting. I still ordered it a few times though because it was still an exciting item although it was practically inedible.

You could coat them with small quantities of tempered chocolate for a much less disgusting effect.

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For variations on an egg dish I would either poach or suos vide a quail egg and then serve it on a tasting spoon with various additions on the spoon: one was pop-rocks. The creamy texture of the yolk and popping sensation was interesting.

Mixing them with smoked salt was also used in several savory settings.

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