• Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

EllenH

Favorite single malt

199 posts in this topic

I am about one half-step up from a novice in terms of single malt expertise. My cabinet currently contains Highland Park and Macallan Cask Strength. Any suggestions on what to add to this, perhaps for an evening of tasting with friends? A nice variety in flavors would be fun. Anybody ever done a scotch tasting? Would you have food with that? (cheese or something)

Cheers :raz:


"What, after all, is more seductive than the prospect of sinning in libraries?"

Michael Dirda, An Open Book

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Those are two good ones to start with, HP is my personal favorite. Try Laphraoig, people seem to either love it or hate it because of its medicinal quality.

Smoked salmon would be good to serve. :smile:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Husband is a fan of scotch so we have Lagavulin, Oban, Glenlivet, and Glenmorangie 18 on hand most of the time.


Melissa Goodman aka "Gifted Gourmet"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Can't ever go wrong with Mac, or Lagavulin for that matter (although it is a bit peaty for some). How do you like your single malts? Peatier or lighter? More alcoholic or less?

Springbank 25 is another beauty to give a try.


I want pancakes! God, do you people understand every language except English? Yo quiero pancakes! Donnez moi pancakes! Click click bloody click pancakes!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My favorite of all times is The Macallan 18yr Gran Reserva


"My rule of life prescribed as an absolutely sacred rite smoking cigars and also the drinking of alcohol before, after and if need be during all meals and in the intervals between them." ~Winston Churchill

Morels- God's gift to the unworthy human species

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We have too many scotches to list. (hubby adores scotch), but for a novice, Strathisla is a lovely scotch to start with.


Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You might want to try for a geographical spread, in which case you could add Auchentoshan (a lowland), Springbank (from Campletown), and Bowmore or Laphroaig 15 year old.

As for food, I'd suggest smoked salmon, as mentioned above. In fact, any lightly smoked food is a good match (stay away from anything too spicy, though). Mushrooms can be a good match. And you absolutely can't beat caramel and Scotch.


Janet A. Zimmerman, aka "JAZ"
Manager
jzimmerman@eGullet.org
eG Ethics signatory
Author, The Healthy Pressure Cooker Cookbook and All About Cooking for Two

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm another fan of Glenmorangie 18. I've also had a number of Mackillop's scotches which I've always enjoyed.

I find that matjes herring is a great accompaniment when doing a tasting.


"Some people see a sheet of seaweed and want to be wrapped in it. I want to see it around a piece of fish."-- William Grimes

"People are bastard-coated bastards, with bastard filling." - Dr. Cox on Scrubs

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm not a huge Single Malt Scotch drinker but I keep The Balvenie Single Barrel 15 onhand.

The Plowed Society only gave it a 84. Fucking Philistine pig ignorant assholes.


Jason Perlow

Co-Founder, The Society for Culinary Arts & Letters

offthebroiler.com - Food Blog | My Flickr photo stream

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks everybody! That PLOWED society thing is fun, but I noticed that another one I like (Lagavulin) got called "chloraseptic". Yikes. Philistines indeed.

For me & hubby, the peatier the better! Only one exception so far -- we sampled Talisker at a restaurant in Edinburgh & were warned by the waitress that it would put hair on our chests.....that one was a VERY SLOW sipping scotch :blink:


"What, after all, is more seductive than the prospect of sinning in libraries?"

Michael Dirda, An Open Book

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ardbeg, 1977, but mostly the 10 year old.

But, the most interesting thing is tasting variety and the Scotch Malt Whisky Society has had some interesting 30+ malts, that have been good. Often the older malts don't taste so great though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dalwhinnie is a good one for peat (if my memory serves) and is usually easy to find. In contrast Lagavulin was difficult to obtain for awhile and its price has increased.

Speaking of aging in used port and sherry casks, I also like Balvenie Double Wood.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Plowed Society elaborates even further ! :laugh:

Their disclaimer is over ten years old! :shock:

These ratings in no way reflect the opinions of the entire PLOWED Society at this time...just a few drunken amateurs in about 1993 or so....it's funny to look at these ratings because we feel that many newbies to this sport would  probably record similar impressions

Cheer up, Jason! The Philistines aren't quite what they initially appeared ... :rolleyes:


Melissa Goodman aka "Gifted Gourmet"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ellen-

If you like 'em peaty, try most any Islay - Lag, Ardberg, Bowmore, Laphroaig.

They should all do good by you.


I want pancakes! God, do you people understand every language except English? Yo quiero pancakes! Donnez moi pancakes! Click click bloody click pancakes!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You may want to add a Talisker Single Malt 10 Year- From the Isle of Skye. This one has a very distinct smokey flavor that you will either love or hate. Either way I'm certain that you'll find someone who will drink it if you don't like it. It's not too hard to give away scotch!


GoodEater

Vivo per mangiare!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm not a scotch lover, but my husband's favorite is Glenmorangie sherry-wood casked (or something along those lines).

Speaking of smoked salmon, there's a bagel place in Towson, MD that has an amazing selection of smoked salmon, including one smoked in (with?) single malt scotch. It's really delicious.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's hard to pick favorites, but if I had to, I'd say Laphroaig among the Islays, and Oban among the Highlands.

Cheers,

Squeat

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Right now, I have Macallan 12yr, Balvenie 12yr Doublewood and Lagavulin on hand.

There's still something special about the Balvenie Doublewood. It's just... what's the word I'm looking for here... "luxurious"? The Macallan 12yr is aged 100% in sherry casks and The Balvenie Doublewood is only finished in sherry casks but the Balvenie offering seems more complex and refined somehow. That isn't to say the Macallan is less than impressive! One thing I highly enjoy about the Macallan 12yr is that it seems to have a more "woody" taste to it.

Then there's Lagavulin. I can't say whether Balvenie Doublewood or Lagavulin is my favorite since they're incredibly different.. but Lagavulin puts up a great fight. A small sip of it is like a train pushing down your throat. It's huge and powerful.. smoky and salty. It's soothing, warming and rejuvinating. The finish lasts for miles and seems to hang around for hours. I admit I did not like it the first time I tasted it but liked it the second time and loved it by the third.

Since you already have a Macallan scotch, I wouldn't suggest the Macallan 12yr or Balvenie since you have your sherry-casked scotch. I WOULD highly suggest trying an Islay malt like Lagavulin, though. Once you grow a taste for it, it's unbeatable. It'll give you a nice change of pace from the lighter Highland Park (but everything seems lighter compared to drinks like Lagavulin and Laphroaig).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I'm not a scotch lover, but my husband's favorite is Glenmorangie sherry-wood casked (or something along those lines).

Speaking of smoked salmon, there's a bagel place in Towson, MD that has an amazing selection of smoked salmon, including one smoked in (with?) single malt scotch. It's really delicious.

When I am not drinking Macallan I agree with the Glenmorangie Sherry cask vote

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lagavulin 12 years. Nothing to add.

Springbank 1967 / 32 years from Signatory Vintage maybe ? ...


"Je préfère le vin d'ici à l'au-delà"

Francis Blanche

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Scotch, like many other things is a matter of taste. If you are serious about single malts join the Scotch Malt Whisky Society of America (www.smwsa.com). For a tasting try malts from four different regions of Scotland and of varying ages. Crackers and a mild cheese go well and don't interfere with the tasting. My favorites come from Islay with the exception of Laphroig which I think tastes like Iodine. Caol Ila, Bowmore, Ardbeg and Lagavulin are each different and very good.


Bob Sherwood

____________

“When the wolf is at the door, one should invite him in and have him for dinner.”

- M.F.K. Fisher

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Scotch is not my drink of choice, but I do care for it from time to time.

I have a bottle of Glenmorangie 10 year old that I have been enjoying a glass of here and there over the past year and a half, I have to say that I find it enjoyable when I get that rare scotch craving.


He don't mix meat and dairy,

He don't eat humble pie,

So sing a miserere

And hang the bastard high!

- Richard Wilbur and John LaTouche from Candide

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some excellent single malts mentioned here. Does anyone know -- ballpark -- how many single malts are available for sale here in the U.S.?

I haven't tasted many but of the ones I've had, Macallan 12 year old was like ambrosia to my unsophisticated palate. I have an affordable Aberlour in my liquor cabinet now, along with some JW Black (a blended Scotch, of course).

Does anyone like theirs the way I sometimes do -- after a fine dinner, in a cognac snifter?


Sacred cows make the best hamburger.

- Mark Twain, 1835 - 1910

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a bottle of Ledaig in my cabinet that I rather like. Unfortunately the bottle was bought for me over there by family, and in PA the only way you can get it is to buy the 20-year for $61... by the case.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.