Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

EllenH

Favorite single malt

Recommended Posts

This month's meeting of the Philadelphia chapter of LUPEC this past Monday was a day of shooting clays and drinking scotch. I've never really warmed up to scotch whiskeys but I'm learning. After our afternoon with firearms and hot scotch spiked cider (afterward, for those of you concerned for our safety) we were treated to a tasting of Glenfiddich scotches hosted by Heather Greene, the Glenfiddich brand ambassador, and one of the few female whiskey experts in the world. Our hosts for the event were the Trestle Inn, a recently reopened whiskey and go-go bar here in Philly that boasts one of the finest selections of brown spirits in the city. Delicious Glenfiddich based cocktails and a tasting through the 12 year, 15 year and 18 year old single malts was very enlightening for me. I thought all single malts were really peaty and smoky, but now I know better. The flask with me during the day was filled with Balvenie Doublewood, which is another single malt I've grown quite fond of. Definitely a day filled with activities appropriate for proper Scottish ladies. :smile:


Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I too am a big fan of SMWS. The only downside is that you may never get the same bottling again.

This comment has been made before about SMWS bottlings. If we draw a comparison with wines, those in the know still talk about the 1998 Châteauneuf du Pape. Getting a perfect vintage is such a random event that it is noteworthy. I see the same thing with SMWS bottlings: their rarity is a positive. After all, if the supply was unlimited, what would the cognoscenti have to talk about?


Nick Reynolds, aka "nickrey"

"The Internet is full of false information." Plato
My eG Foodblog

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This month's meeting of the Philadelphia chapter of LUPEC this past Monday was a day of shooting clays and drinking scotch. I've never really warmed up to scotch whiskeys but I'm learning. After our afternoon with firearms and hot scotch spiked cider (afterward, for those of you concerned for our safety) we were treated to a tasting of Glenfiddich scotches hosted by Heather Greene, the Glenfiddich brand ambassador, and one of the few female whiskey experts in the world. Our hosts for the event were the Trestle Inn, a recently reopened whiskey and go-go bar here in Philly that boasts one of the finest selections of brown spirits in the city. Delicious Glenfiddich based cocktails and a tasting through the 12 year, 15 year and 18 year old single malts was very enlightening for me. I thought all single malts were really peaty and smoky, but now I know better. The flask with me during the day was filled with Balvenie Doublewood, which is another single malt I've grown quite fond of. Definitely a day filled with activities appropriate for proper Scottish ladies. :smile:

what were the cocktails? i adore glen fiddich.


abstract expressionist beverage compounder

creator of acquired tastes

bostonapothecary.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The flask with me during the day was filled with Balvenie Doublewood, which is another single malt I've grown quite fond of.

I love Balvenie Doublewood. The sherry notes give it some similarity to the Aberlour A'bunadh that's been discussed upthread, although the latter, of course, has a much richer, deeper taste, along with being a cask strength whisky. The first time I tasted Macallan's 10 Year Fine Oak, for example, I was rather unimpressed. It didn't do anything for me at all. I later realized that what I was "missing" was the sherry cask aspect of their flagship 12 Year expression (I don't think two-year difference in age accounted for much of the distinction). Then there's the Balvenie 21 Year Port Wood--Oh my.


Mike

"The mixing of whiskey, bitters, and sugar represents a turning point, as decisive for American drinking habits as the discovery of three-point perspective was for Renaissance painting." -- William Grimes

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Then there's the Balvenie 21 Year Port Wood--Oh my.

Oh my, indeed...if ever I need to shed a false tear I only need think of the fact that a bottle has increased in price by over $100 in the past 5 years. I enjoy everything from the Balvenie, but the 21 year is my perfect Scotch.


True rye and true bourbon wake delight like any great wine...dignify man as possessing a palate that responds to them and ennoble his soul as shimmering with the response.

DeVoto, The Hour

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Picked up some Glenfiddich 21 'Gran Reserva' rum finish at the duty free store in Abu Dhabi airport yesterday. Very nice. Was sorely tempted by the Laphroaig Quarter Cask--and I was on the hunt for the Glenmorangie Signet, too--but they'd have pushed me over the duty free allowance (I already had some South African wine in my luggage).


Edited by ChrisTaylor (log)

Chris Taylor

Host, eG Forums - ctaylor@egstaff.org

 

I've never met an animal I didn't enjoy with salt and pepper.

Melbourne
Harare, Victoria Falls and some places in between

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

... (I already had some South African wine in my luggage).

There's your trouble!


It's almost never bad to feed someone.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For my own part, I found the Glenmorangie Signet to be very forgettable, especially given the price. Now the Astar, that's some nice stuff, though I don't know if they are still making it.


Andy Arrington

Journeyman Drinksmith

Twitter--@LoneStarBarman

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Has anyone tried any of the new Kilchoman releases yet? It is a new distillery on Islay that has started putting out a bit of whisky recently.

I was offered a bottle of the Summer 2010 release (I think. Might be the Autumn release). Not that big a scotch whisky drinker but a bit intrigued given the fairly postive reviews which suggest it is mature well beyound its relatively tender young age.


If you pick up a starving dog and make him prosperous, he will not bite you. This is the principal difference between a dog and a man. ~Mark Twain

Some people are like a Slinky. They are not really good for anything, but you still can't help but smile when you shove them down the stairs...

~tanstaafl2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My two current faves:

Ardbeg,Uigeadail -- has very much lived up to the hype. My favorite Islay by a mile.

Glenmorangie, Nector D'Or -- This is pretty much the opposite of the Uigeadail, but I love it as well. More balanced than most of Glenmorangie's Port and Sherry finish expressions.

I also recently tried the Balvenie 14yr Rum Cask. It was a little funky but not particularly special. Just ok I guess, maybe the 17yr is better.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ardberg Uigeadail is really good. My everyday drinker is Bowmore 12, From probably my favorite 'house' bottom to top.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Ardbeg Uigeadail is one of my favourite Islays. If not the favourite (which is not to say there's anything wrong with standard Ardbeg, Lagavulin, Laphroaig, Coal Ila, et al). Ardbeg's products are consistently good.


Chris Taylor

Host, eG Forums - ctaylor@egstaff.org

 

I've never met an animal I didn't enjoy with salt and pepper.

Melbourne
Harare, Victoria Falls and some places in between

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm a great fan of the Clynelish 14 year old so when I saw a bottle today I bought it. Now, as I sit here typing this, I am regretting that I didn't buy two bottles because the place I found it is two hours away and it isn't available anywhere nearby.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

'Shackleton's whisky'--Mackinlay's Rare Old Highland Malt. It's really quite mediocre. It might even verge on 'shit', but maybe I'm doing some statistical bullshitingaround given the price tag. The $200AUD asking price? It's for the story, not the dram. For that I could buy a 25 year old Glenfarclas (beautiful stuff ... and I'd have change) or some Laphroaig, Oban and something else.


Edited by ChrisTaylor (log)

Chris Taylor

Host, eG Forums - ctaylor@egstaff.org

 

I've never met an animal I didn't enjoy with salt and pepper.

Melbourne
Harare, Victoria Falls and some places in between

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Things I've tried in the past few days, scotch and bourbon and rye

  • Springbank 18: I've heard big things about the Springbank still, so I guess I expected a lot. It was ... okay. I'm glad I didn't blind-buy it like I was tempted to only recently.
  • Eagle Rare. To the best of my knowledge, this is the first time I've had Eagle Rare ... and I admit I haven't really tried any bourbon below the Buffalo Trace/Woodford Reserve/Blanton's price point (purely because, in Australia, the true entry-level stuff is ~$5-10 cheaper than these, which isn't so bad when you're talking about a $40 vs $50 bottle of something). But. Yeah. I disliked this. I mean, if someone gave me a bottle as a gift I wouldn't regift it--I guess I'd find a use for it--but it's not something I'd purchase by choice.
  • Russell's Reserve in its bourbon and rye forms. Both good, but I'm a bit surprised that I enjoyed the bourbon version more. Which is ideal, I guess, as it's much easier to buy bourbon in Australia than it is rye.
  • Van Winkle rye. Amazing. Truly amazing. Up there with Thomas Handy. And $110 cheaper than Thomas Handy ... meaning it's still a $190 bottle of whiskey, but hey, it's a nice $190 bottle of whiskey.


Chris Taylor

Host, eG Forums - ctaylor@egstaff.org

 

I've never met an animal I didn't enjoy with salt and pepper.

Melbourne
Harare, Victoria Falls and some places in between

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Things I've tried in the past few days, scotch and bourbon and rye

  • Eagle Rare. To the best of my knowledge, this is the first time I've had Eagle Rare ... and I admit I haven't really tried any bourbon below the Buffalo Trace/Woodford Reserve/Blanton's price point (purely because, in Australia, the true entry-level stuff is ~$5-10 cheaper than these, which isn't so bad when you're talking about a $40 vs $50 bottle of something). But. Yeah. I disliked this. I mean, if someone gave me a bottle as a gift I wouldn't regift it--I guess I'd find a use for it--but it's not something I'd purchase by choice.

Interesting x2, partly because this is the first time I've ever heard of a whiskey drinker who didn't care for Eagle Rare, and partly because Eagle rare is usually 20-30% more expensive that Buffalo Trace over here (and neither is as expensive as Woodford or Blantons).


Andy Arrington

Journeyman Drinksmith

Twitter--@LoneStarBarman

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It is. I'm a bit of a rebel that way, posting musings on blends and rye and bourbon and Irish and Australian whiskies in a single malt scotch thread.

Australian whisky? Did I miss that upthread? Tell me more...

  • Like 1

Matthew Kayahara

Kayahara.ca

@mtkayahara

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Er, I'm assuming at some point I've posted one liner reviews of something like the Smith's Angaston or Hellyer's Road or Sullivan's Cove or the new 100% rye (white spirit only at the moment--the still is only very new). Maybe. But yeah. Australian whiskey exists. Most of it is young due to low demand/low production/real need to get the product to punters asap to make any kind of money at all. It's also often expensive. Some of it's imported or, through some ninjagoogling and the wonders of the postal system, might make its way to Guelph, Ontario.

Lark: the original, I think, in the sense it was the first legally operated still and brought about a change in laws that, well, let people make whisky. Sort of trying to be an Islay. I don't like it very much. They also make a gin, a vodka (I think), a liqueur and some other stuff.

Sullivan's Cove: only had the double barrel variant, as that's what's avaliable on the site in a 150mL mini (the large bottles are very expensive). It's just okay.

Bakery Hill: yet to try that or some other smaller (a couple of them closed) 'stills, such as Nant (meant to be excellent)

Hellyer's Road: decent, I guess. The peated and pinot noir finish variants are my favourite. From memory these guys and Bakery Hill sell boxes that contain minis of each variant. I'd recommend this over buying a whole bottle if you're only just curious about this. And even then, the mini price is pretty expensive.

Smith's Angaston: very limited run. Product of a monster-sized company that purchased a plot of land and, hey, cool, there's a still here. Made some whiskey, aged it for some time (8, 10, 12 and I think there's an even older variant coming out eventually). Possibly the one Australian whiskey I've had that's not trying to be scotch (more than a few nod to Islay: I guess because, if you have consumed both a bottle of Lark and a bottle of Laphroaig and were travelling blind-folded with a busload of bagpipe-playing Scottish tourists, Tasmania could easily be confused for Scotland) and sold it every so often. Stumbled on it by chance. Very good. The only one I've had that I'd rate up there with the rest of the world's offerings, altho' some locals will frown and say that Hellyer's/Bakery/etc, young as they are, are perfectly fine and really only just need more age on them. I hope at least one of those 'stills has thought to put, say, half of their batch in barrels for 10, 12 years and to start selling that. Altho' if I need to pay ~$100AUD or even more, in some cases, for a three or so year old whisky, I hate to think of what I'd pay for some 10 year old Lark.

EDIT

Just so you know, New Zealand also makes whisky. At least one of their stills sells their product internationally. In the sense you can find it fairly easily in Australia. I think it's even meant to be okay. Nice, super-tourisity packaging, too, with a big map of Middle Earth the country and everything, so maybe it does go even further afield.


Edited by ChrisTaylor (log)

Chris Taylor

Host, eG Forums - ctaylor@egstaff.org

 

I've never met an animal I didn't enjoy with salt and pepper.

Melbourne
Harare, Victoria Falls and some places in between

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This Bruichladdich Port Charlotte An Turas Mor is tasty, if a bit light -- remarkable to say for something as peaty as this. But I'm comparing it to the otherworldly Aberlour A'bunadh 19 that I found, miracle of miracles, on the shelf of a local store. It may well be that I'm a fan of a great big sherry fruitcake cuddle, but this thing is a black, burnt caramel bombshell.


Chris Amirault

camirault@eGstaff.org

eG Ethics Signatory

Sir Luscious got gator belts and patty melts

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...