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typically southern beverages


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Trust me, Guy has heard it all.

His situation at Dixie as the brewmaster was no worse than brewing in Sarajevo during the war, maybe even better. :raz::laugh:

Dixie is a fine, state of the art, brewery. If the state of the art was currently circa 1950.

Brooks Hamaker, aka "Mayhaw Man"

There's a train everyday, leaving either way...

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Dixie is a fine, state of the art, brewery. If the state of the art was currently circa 1950.

I love this comment, Brooks! It is so very appealing and makes me want to go out and stock up on this "Nectar of the Gods" ... :laugh:

Melissa Goodman aka "Gifted Gourmet"

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I told the young tatooed, pierced semi-Goth waiter that I wanted half unsweetened iced tea and half lemonade. He gleefully informed me: "Oh - I know that drink - it's called a Robert Palmer!".

Might as well face it, you're addicted to tea...

enrevanche <http://enrevanche.blogspot.com>

Greenwich Village, NYC

The only way to keep your health is to eat what you don't want, drink what you don't like, and do what you'd rather not.

- Mark Twain

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In fact weren't nearly all the "soft drinks" invented and nurtured in the south?

Coke\Pepsi\RC\Double etc. for colas

DrP\Cherwine\Nehi etc

Of course if you drank Donald Duck Orange or Grape in the big (10 oz) bottle you were surely southern.

Then again, I liked the old brown bottle Orange Crush too - and I think it was from Cali far nia.

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They used to put salt on their can of Schlitz and take a bit before the beer. Like a margarita. Don't see that much anymore! Saw it at a Cajun dancehall in Lewisburg. Louisiana a few years ago. My wife asked "What's the salt shakers doing on the tables? They serve food here?" I demo'd, she couldn't believe it...

That reminds me. Peanuts in your coke (coca-cola, dr. pepper, orange coke, grape coke...)

Edited by My Confusing Horoscope (log)

Scorpio

You'll be surprised to find out that Congress is empowered to forcibly sublet your apartment for the summer.

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almost forgot! cream soda coke!

But we also used to say "pop." I have friends who still rib me for the way I can sometimes come out with something so Cajun sounding even though I have been living far away many years. Like the time dinner was ready and I said "Come fix your pop" (serve yourselves a soft drink)

Scorpio

You'll be surprised to find out that Congress is empowered to forcibly sublet your apartment for the summer.

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Of course if you drank Donald Duck Orange...

Ah yes....orange drink arnge drank.

:biggrin:

Edited by Jaymes (log)

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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A discussion of drinks (hard and soft) developed in the south has to include the Hurricane. And speaking of New Orleans, Southern Comfort.

Also, Ski from Kentucky, as made famous in the Kentucky Headhunters song "Dumas Walker".

And if I recall correctly, the Cuba Libre was developed in Florida. Though I may be mistaken.

And would a snoball be considered a beverage?

Screw it. It's a Butterball.
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And would a snoball be considered a beverage?

Heading south to New Orleans, that city's sizzling weather gave birth to a local icy dessert favorite called the snowball. In fact, any New Orleans native most likely can give a 10-minute lecture on how the snowball differs from the Yankee snow cone — and why it's best not to confuse the two terms. The biggest difference is the ice itself, because shaved ice tends to have a lighter, creamier texture than the snow cone's crushed ice. In addition, snowballs, unlike snow cones, boast a variety of toppings.

Might this be the one you are referring to, FistFullaRoux??

Yes, the heat of New Orleans makes it a beverage in short order!! :biggrin:

Melissa Goodman aka "Gifted Gourmet"

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Might this be the one you are referring to, FistFullaRoux??

Yes, the heat of New Orleans makes it a beverage in short order!! :biggrin:

Yes, that be the one. Snoball, snowball, close enough. It's whatever is painted on the side of the little shed in the neighborhood you grew up in.

Screw it. It's a Butterball.
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Of course if you drank Donald Duck Orange...

Ah yes....orange drink arnge drank.

:biggrin:

Good lord. I have such strong memories of often visiting people in Florida, surrounded by cheap fresh squeezed orange juice, opening their fridges and seeing...

Donald Duck Orange Juice.

I recall it being horrid. I always wondered, if they were sick of OJ, why they didn't just switch fruits entirely rather than drink "The Duck". Why was Donald smiling (if a Duck can be said to smile) on the package? Was it some evil plot by Disney?

Jon Lurie, aka "jhlurie"

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not much of a fan of "sweet tea" myself. but my favorite "cocola" has to be cheerwine. peach nehi's pretty tasty too and also spicy hot blenheim "gingale." is "wink" a southern thing?? been known to have gin and wink on a particularly hot afternoon.

"Ham isn't heroin..." Morgan Spurlock from "Supersize Me"

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Since this has devolved into a general thread about all things southern, how about Mountain Dew when it was Mountain Dew? In the green returnable bottles with the enamaled label featuring a hillbilly. Anyone else remember this?

Not only do I remember this, but my mother knew the guy who invented Mountain Dew. Not the original formula (never widely marketed, lemon-lime like Sprite or 7 Up), but the one that was eventually marketed by Pepsi. His name was Bill Jones and he was from Marion, VA. His family had fallen on very hard times in the period before he hit it big with Mountain Dew, and my mother recalls his wife having to hold her shoes together with canning rubbers.

[above quote scavenged from the Chik-fil-A thread]

Here is a link to a discussion and timeline of the evolution of this drink, including the role of Bill Jones (referred to above)...

Mountain Dew History

Those who do not remember the pasta are doomed to reheat it.

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"all day preachin' & dinner on the ground", home-coming, revivals, camp meeting, &c where under the big oak tree--about midway between the poured concrete table where all the food was displayed and the cemetery and far enough fr/ the gravel parking lot to keep the dirt out of them--were two huge wash tubs. One of those wash tubs had tea and the other one had lemonade. Both of them had a huge block of ice floating right smack dab in the middle. The tea, or swee-tee--as it was pronounced, contained so much sugar it would actually make the fillings in your teeth hurt and the lemonade was not far behind....

Great post Lan4dawg---thanks for sharing and taking the time to convey the memories with some great writing!

Can just picture the old guy telling about making the lemonade...fishing in the cooler for the coke and also the passing around of the mason jar or paper 'poke'...

"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"

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Does Canada Dry even *make* Wink any more?  It's been years since I've seen a bottle.  God, I used to love that stuff.

$1.35 each!! :biggrin: maybe I should have said $1.35 a pop!! :wink:

thanks for the link g.g.-i feel a happy hour coming on!

"Ham isn't heroin..." Morgan Spurlock from "Supersize Me"

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Of course if you drank Donald Duck Orange...

Ah yes....orange drink arnge drank.

:biggrin:

Good lord. I have such strong memories of often visiting people in Florida, surrounded by cheap fresh squeezed orange juice, opening their fridges and seeing...

Donald Duck Orange Juice.

The drink mentioned was not juice rather a soda like Nehi or Orange Crush. They also made grape which was popular, strawberry which wasn't. Others too.

Edited by wilewil (log)
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"all day preachin' & dinner on the ground", home-coming, revivals, camp meeting, &c where under the big oak tree--about midway between the poured concrete table where all the food was displayed and the cemetery and far enough fr/ the gravel parking lot to keep the dirt out of them--were two huge wash tubs.  One of those wash tubs had tea and the other one had lemonade.  Both of them had a huge block of ice floating right smack dab in the middle.  The tea, or swee-tee--as it was pronounced, contained so much sugar it would actually make the fillings in your teeth hurt and the lemonade was not far behind....

Great post Lan4dawg---thanks for sharing and taking the time to convey the memories with some great writing!

Can just picture the old guy telling about making the lemonade...fishing in the cooler for the coke and also the passing around of the mason jar or paper 'poke'...

thank you for the kind words. I enjoyed the memories it brought back while writing it. As a "PK" (preacher's kid for those uninitiated) we had several little churches through out north Georgia with situations similar to the one I described.

in loving memory of Mr. Squirt (1998-2004)--

the best cat ever.

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