Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

typically southern beverages


Recommended Posts

Apropos of Southern beverages broadly, the Southern Food & Beverage Museum in New Orleans (new organization, no permanent home yet, great acronym SOFAB) opened on June 12th an exhibit called "A Toast of New Orleans."

Pasted article below ~

More specifically, one of my customers recently brought to me a six-pack of Cheerwine. I'm a fiend for the stuff and mentioned it casually some months back. I didn't have the heart to tell him that it had all gone flat (a vexingly common defect of the plastic bottles, but not of the cans or glass bottled versions). What a let-down. Until I remembered a technique I've yet to try: green ham simmered in a Coke-based broth. I suspect a Cheerwine variant is hitting a table near me sometime this weekend...

Oh, and that's not some Dr. Seuss green ham; that was my mother's term for fresh hams, uncooked, uncured and un-countrified.

Matt

Edit by Jason Perlow - no cutting and pasting of copyrighted articles on the site, please follow our fair use practices, thanks.

Matthew B. Rowley

Rowley's Whiskey Forge, a blog of drinks, food, and the making thereof

Author of Moonshine! (ISBN: 1579906486)

Link to post
Share on other sites

Huh, so far there's only been one mention of moonshine, and that in passing....

I grew up in Roanoke, VA, right next door to Franklin County, the self-proclaimed "Moonshine Capital of the World"- you can even get t-shirts that say that. There was a big controversy about ten years ago when the feds discovered the largest still ever in neighboring Floyd County-

folks in Franklin County claimed they had the world's largest still, it just ain't been found yet.

Sometimes, when parked at a convenience store in a rural area, you will be approached by a man selling jugs of White Lightnin out of the trunk of his car.

I'd recommend trying the various fruit-infused shines native to this region. Strawberry and grape are popular, but I find the peach moonshine is by far the best. You can drink the liquor, or you can eat the peaches. Either way you will get drunk. And once you get past the fire, it's really quite pleasant for sippin'.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Blenheim's Old No. 3 Hot Ginger Ale.

The best ginger ale on the planet, bottled in South Carolina since 1903. Makes a bourbon-and-ginger to die for.

I second the motion. Hot Blenheim's and bourbon are made for each other.

And on the ice tea, you have to have a sprig of mint. (And yes, it is Ice Tea, not Iced Tea.)

Kathleen Purvis, food editor, The Charlotte (NC) Observer

Link to post
Share on other sites

having lived in the south (alabama) and gone to college in the south (texas-ok, it's like a whole 'nother country), the drink i miss the most is big red. lucky me went to college in waco, where big red was invented and made (as well as dr. pepper according to the dr. pepper museum located in waco), so waco also got some initial attempts at other products made by big red corp, like big peach. . although, i did find big peach at a gas station store in bristol, tn.

while people said bourbon, i'm surprised that jack daniels hasn't been mentioned (admittedly, i could have missed it), which is not a bourbon. . .jack is probably my all-time favourite southern beverage (especially since i don't like tea, of any sorts). :smile:

Link to post
Share on other sites
having lived in the south (alabama) and gone to college in the south (texas-ok, it's like a whole 'nother country), the drink i miss the most is big red. 
Bottled in Waco, TX this sweet, bubble gum flavored soda has been a southern favorite since 1937. Great on a hot summer day, your kids will love it!

between this and a slice of red velvet cake, one's blood glucose levels would be off the chart! Thanks for reminding me of it!! :biggrin: bubble gum flavored soda? hmmmm.... :rolleyes:

Melissa Goodman aka "Gifted Gourmet"

Link to post
Share on other sites

tried big red one time in san antonio-ONE TIME-that's all it took to cure me of this drink for perpetuity. this stuff has to be the sweetest, nastiest soda ever invented. period!

"Ham isn't heroin..." Morgan Spurlock from "Supersize Me"

Link to post
Share on other sites
Blenheim's Old No. 3 Hot Ginger Ale

The best ginger ale on the planet, bottled in South Carolina since 1903.  Makes a bourbon-and-ginger to die for. 

I second the motion. Hot Blenheim's and bourbon are made for each other.

And on the ice tea, you have to have a sprig of mint. (And yes, it is Ice Tea, not Iced Tea.)

I recently gave Fat Guy some of the hot Blenheim's as well as some of its milder sibling. I informed him that the red-top was spicy, but being the tough guy that he is, he poured a bottle into a glass of ice, took a big swig, and yelled out, "MOTHERFUCKER!!!!" After his skin tones returned to a normal hue, he continued to sip his ginger ale, praising its merits. It was a very nice scene. :wink:

By the way, Blenheim's is now owned by the Schafer family, who also own that wonderful land of kitsch otherwise known as South of the Border. If you're headed on I-95 and crossing the NC-SC border, do stop by and try to find the Blenheim's plant. And if you have a head cold, buy 2 six packs of the hot stuff!

And Kathi, we don't really call it Ice Tea, either, you know. It's just, "tea."

Dean McCord

VarmintBites

Link to post
Share on other sites
Huh, so far there's only been one mention of moonshine

I have to add too, that no City Council members in the North ever offered me a drink out of the trunk of their car at a public reception starting with the phrase, "Hey boys come 'or here for a bit." It seems that every one I worked with in Shelby County, south of B'ham, AL had still out back. Its only illegal if you sell it.

Bode

Link to post
Share on other sites

I stopped by South of the Border yesterday and picked up a case each of the diet, hot, and regular Blenheim's. They sell them at $12.95 a case, which is more than what I pay for beer!!!! :wink:

Dean McCord

VarmintBites

Link to post
Share on other sites

Then again, I liked the old brown bottle Orange Crush too - and I think it was from Cali far nia.

We LOVED the old Orange Crush! It wasn't orange, though, and as I recall it tasted kind of like Fresca (and looked like it too). Am I remembering correctly? When I was a kid (late 60's) we used to fill up the car on trips to Myrtle Beach and haul all we could back to Winston-Salem, where it wasn't available. I remember when it finally was available in NC, but by then it was the nasty orange stuff.

My mother lived on Cheerwine. She used to get it shipped to her in Fla. :smile:

Anne

Link to post
Share on other sites
And Kathi, we don't really call it Ice Tea, either, you know. It's just, "tea."

Absolutely correct.

In fact, it is just the opposite-When the very rare occasion occurs that some social misfit wants something other than tea, they will need to ask for "hot tea", otherwise they will get regular tea (iced). They will also most likely get a cup of luke warm water and a bag of Lipton.

One of the worst things that happens in restaurants concerning tea is when the tea is served in giant pitchers with tons of ice in them. THe ice slowly melts and causes the tea to become brown water. I am a much happier camper when I see a couple of tea urns on the service station or behind the bar (sweet and unsweet) as I know that I have a pretty good chance of getting a delicious, refreshing beverage to accompany my meal instead of some brown water with too much ice.

Brooks Hamaker, aka "Mayhaw Man"

There's a train everyday, leaving either way...

Link to post
Share on other sites

Unreal! No one has mentioned "Ice Water"!!!!!!

Or "ahyce watah", rather.

I can't have a glass of water without loading it up with ice and almost feel a bit of disgust when I see other people drinking warm water fom a Brita. UGH! In Memphis, you can drink from the tap as the water coems from Artesian wells...yum.

Link to post
Share on other sites
And Kathi, we don't really call it Ice Tea, either, you know.  It's just, "tea."

Absolutely correct.

In fact, it is just the opposite-When the very rare occasion occurs that some social misfit wants something other than tea, they will need to ask for "hot tea", otherwise they will get regular tea (iced). They will also most likely get a cup of luke warm water and a bag of Lipton.

One of the worst things that happens in restaurants concerning tea is when the tea is served in giant pitchers with tons of ice in them. THe ice slowly melts and causes the tea to become brown water. I am a much happier camper when I see a couple of tea urns on the service station or behind the bar (sweet and unsweet) as I know that I have a pretty good chance of getting a delicious, refreshing beverage to accompany my meal instead of some brown water with too much ice.

I can't recall the specific place, but one restaurant just gave you a bucket of ice and a pitcher of warm tea. That was a great set-up, as you were assured of getting the maximum dose of sugar from the tea.

Dean McCord

VarmintBites

Link to post
Share on other sites

A couple I'm surprised haven't been mentioned are sassafras tea and sarsaparilla soda. A google search has led me to believe that the latter (a root beer relative) is mostly associated with the Old West, but my only memories of both these beverages are from my North Carolina childhood.

And then there was my grandmother's elderberry wine, and the wine she made from wild muscadine grapes. Yum!

Cheers,

Squeat

Link to post
Share on other sites

Squeat reminded me of one that I had forgotten to mention. My children loved Zatarain's Root Beer when they were little and I like it too. We kinda stopped making it after we started making Abita Root Beer (yet another Southern Beverage I failed to mention).

Brooks Hamaker, aka "Mayhaw Man"

There's a train everyday, leaving either way...

Link to post
Share on other sites

I grew up in Texas, with relatives in Tennessee and Mississippi. . .Peach Nehi was my mom's favorite thing EVER, my dad was a HUGE RC Cola fan, and I would get rewarded with a Big Red when I was really good on car trips. Cokes weren't for everyday drinkin', that's what "warter", tea, and "maylk" were for.

I still squeal with joy when I find Peach Nehi in gas station coolers on road trips.

Papaw (in Tennessee) lived in a pretty rural area, and between him & his neighbors, there was always an ample supply of strawberry wine, blackberry wine, and moonshine in the cellar (next to the pickles and chowchow). I was too young to ever be able to taste it, but when people not from the South question the validity of "strawberry wine", I'm quick to defend it as a real beverage.

And I distinctly remember Mamaw making egg nog every Christmas. . .with bourbon. I don't know if that's the "right" way, but the first time I was allowed to taste it. . .wowee. Blew the socks off a 13-year-old.

Thank you all for the thread. . .recollections like the ones here are what led me to finally register and start posting :wub:

Diana

Link to post
Share on other sites
Thank you all for the thread. . .recollections like the ones here are what led me to finally register and start posting :wub:

We aim to please! Thank you, Diana, for your post on southern beverages and your personal recollections ... looking forward to even more! :biggrin:

Melissa Goodman aka "Gifted Gourmet"

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm glad someone mentioned Big Red..........my Southern Baptist step-grandparents in San Antonio lived on the stuff.........it was my first experience with culture shock: How do you drink *this*? :shock:

I'm a canning clean freak because there's no sorry large enough to cover the, "Oops! I gave you botulism" regrets.

Link to post
Share on other sites

For all you Big Red lovers out there who are watching your figures...Today I was prowling through the aisles of our one locally owned grocery store and what did I discover in the soft drink aisle? DIET Big Red! Who knew?! I didn't buy any, though, so I can't give a report on the taste.

Link to post
Share on other sites

And it should be known that the BEST Coke in the world is to be found at any Waffle House fountain machine.

Oh, and GG, look more carefully at the "flying" coke next time you're at the museum. *wink*

I, too, was, and still am, forbidden to drink "the p-word" since my father is one of Coke's top attorneys.....

Remember the P-word "polar bear" commercial, where the polar bear threw away a Coke in disgust? My good ole pops smacked the crap outta Pepsi in court for that one.

Andrew Baber

True I got more fans than the average man but not enough loot to last me

to the end of the week, I live by the beat like you live check to check

If you don't move yo' feet then I don't eat, so we like neck to neck

A-T-L, Georgia, what we do for ya?

The Gentleman Gourmand

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 month later...

Very little mention of RC Cola. My father-in-law used to live on a breakfat on RC Cola and "four-corner-Nabs" for breakfast (the Nabisco peanut butter cheese crackers). His dessert was a Moon Pie and a Pepsi!

What about buttermilk and cornbread???

Link to post
Share on other sites

I miss the small glass bottles of coke too. I have a vivid memory of riding to "downtown" Burgaw NC with my uncle in the morning and after breakfast at the diner, walking to the hardware store where all the "menfolk" would gather to "ride the train". This involved throwing down a dollar on the pile and getting a coke from the machine. The person (man) with the coke from farthest away won the money.

Was Kickapoo Joy Juice from the South? I remember it growing up too.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...