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hathor

eG Foodblog: hathor - Big Apple Blog

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One of my hunting collegues insisted that wild turkey (the animal of course, not the beverage) is nearly inedible. I was skeptical and look forward to learning more.

Uh-oh...those are fightin' words!! Wild turkey is sumpremely and delicately flavored. Its a rare treat! We are trying to figure out schedules when the hunter and the cooker families can all come together to share the turkey...but for now, the bird is resting in the freezer. But I do promise full details when they are available.

How did your friend prepare the turkey? That could be the clue to the perception of inedible....

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Quick lunch today, as I really do have a day job..... Just a sort of tuna nicoise-y salad with lots of sliced fennel, actually quite tasty, followed up by some watermelon.

I tuned into this too late today, but City Harvest was sponsoring a skip lunch to fight hunger campain. City Harvest is a worthwhile organization, and anything you can do to help is always appreciated.

The food distribution system is a whole other topic, now isn't it? Food subsidies when some people could really use that food. I know it simplistic of me to say it like that, but I do try to help out whenever possible.

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Good for you. City Harvest has an analogue out here, Island Harvest; and when we started testing recipes for L&SD I got in touch with them in hopes that our anticipated oversupply of, er, admittedly slightly odd but certainly highly nutritious foods might serve a useful purpose. Alas, they can only take donations from certain types of certified organizations - understandable, I guess, from a liability standpoint. Still, a pity. In the event, actually, not all that much went to waste - mostly just the really disgusting stuff that we'd have been ashamed to offer anyone....

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Russell Baker once did a great column on donating food that he would never eat anyway...like really cheap A&P tuna. :biggrin:

We all have to do our little bit, I suppose!

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Russell Baker once did a great column on donating food that he would never eat anyway...like really cheap A&P tuna. :biggrin:

We all have to do our little bit, I suppose!

If there's one thing I've learned over the years from people who do fundraising/development is that all those $5 and $10 add up and can be used for something worthwhile.

City Harvest is an organization worth supporting. When I run events where there's leftover food, I always have them called to do a pick-up.

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This weekend, I'm planning on putting in my herb garden, so of course I checked in with Egullet first, and lo and behold is this very infomative thread on gardening. . I think my sister has the monster horseradish problem as well.

I once had to peel about 25 pounds of fresh horseradish...and I still like it! What do people do with fresh horseradish?

The lightening and thunder has stopped, so I'm going to make a run for it and head to the gym. I really don't care much for lightening when I'm on the bridge.

Later!

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How did your friend prepare the turkey? That could be the clue to the perception of inedible....

He says he tried a variety of methods including oven roasting with added moisture. His contention is that it as dry and "just didn't taste good". The only method he found that worked was cutting the meat into strips, pounding to tenderize, then cubing, breading and frying. He's now gorumand but I think his wife knows how to cook and he seems to do well cooking vension and wild duck. Perhaps there's more than one variety of wild turkey? This one was described as having little to no "dark meat".

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How did your friend prepare the turkey? That could be the clue to the perception of inedible....

He says he tried a variety of methods including oven roasting with added moisture. His contention is that it as dry and "just didn't taste good". The only method he found that worked was cutting the meat into strips, pounding to tenderize, then cubing, breading and frying. He's now gorumand but I think his wife knows how to cook and he seems to do well cooking vension and wild duck. Perhaps there's more than one variety of wild turkey? This one was described as having little to no "dark meat".

Poor Turkey didn't have a leg to stand on. :laugh:


Edited by winesonoma (log)

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How did your friend prepare the turkey? That could be the clue to the perception of inedible....

He says he tried a variety of methods including oven roasting with added moisture. His contention is that it as dry and "just didn't taste good". The only method he found that worked was cutting the meat into strips, pounding to tenderize, then cubing, breading and frying. He's now gorumand but I think his wife knows how to cook and he seems to do well cooking vension and wild duck. Perhaps there's more than one variety of wild turkey? This one was described as having little to no "dark meat".

Is he sure it was a turkey?? :blink:

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Stopped at the Greenmarket at Union Sq. on my way downtown, they were closing up as it was late and the thunderstorms were not very good for business. I was able to buy some beautiful mesclun salad with nasturiums, pea shoots and wild spinach, that she also called lambs quarters.

I had a lovely ride over the i6784.jpg Manhattan

Bridge and the sun even tried to come back out.

Tonight we celebrated Mother's Day as we were finally all home and relaxed. I made some cioppino, I think that's what is called/spelled. Its a tomato based shellfish stew that gets served in a bowl, over a garlic/chili/herb toast. The toast soaks up all the juices and is the spicey reward at the bottom of the bowl.

Here's the soffrito, and the olive oil/chili/herb blend ready to get slathered onto the bread. i6785.jpg.

And now...voila! to the table, and quick photo because we were all starving. i6785.jpg.

The salad greens were particularly tasty, I love the peppery taste of nasturiums. They are a must in the herb garden, and they look just as good as they taste.

Many, many thanks to Keifel and Phaelon56 with iPhoto tips!!

I also have a question for Blovatrix. Weren't you the one that posted a good link for digital cameras about 2 months ago?? ....hmmm. Maybe it was Jason Perlow, I'll have to try and Google up that thread.

Cheers all....good night!

edited because I was having some trouble posting using Safari as a browser...i6787.jpg Which is why the salad photo is here!! :wacko:


Edited by hathor (log)

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Stopped at the Greenmarket at Union Sq. on my way downtown, they were closing up as it was late and the thunderstorms were not very good for business. I was able to buy some beautiful mesclun salad with nasturiums, pea shoots and wild spinach, that she also called lambs quarters.

I had a lovely ride over the i6784.jpg Manhattan

Bridge and the sun even tried to come back out.

Tonight we celebrated Mother's Day as we were finally all home and relaxed. I made some cioppino, I think that's what is called/spelled. Its a tomato based shellfish stew that gets served in a bowl, over a garlic/chili/herb toast. The toast soaks up all the juices and is the spicey reward at the bottom of the bowl.

Here's the soffrito, and the olive oil/chili/herb blend ready to get slathered onto the bread. i6785.jpg.

And now...voila! to the table, and quick photo because we were all starving. i6785.jpg.

The salad greens were particularly tasty, I love the peppery taste of nasturiums. They are a must in the herb garden, and they look just as good as they taste. i6786.jpg.

Many, many thanks to Keifel and Phaelon56 with iPhoto tips!!

I also have a question for Blovatrix. Weren't you the one that posted a good link for digital cameras about 2 months ago?? ....hmmm. Maybe it was Jason Perlow, I'll have to try and Google up that thread.

Cheers all....good night!

edited because I was having some trouble posting using Safari as a browser....

God that picture makes me homesick :sad::sad:

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You missing your MIL's cooking STInGER?? I remember you had quite a feast!! How's the ankle...its got to be better by now. :laugh:

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My apologies Blovatrix! It was Rachel Perlow's topic. . That should get you going!! I wound up with a Samsung 4.0...not fabulous, but just fine for my needs, and its very portable. Goes in a pocket.

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MMMmm! :smile:

Thank you for the inspiration! I just love what you had for dinner last night!

What's the story behind the name "lambs quarters"? Interesting.

What herbs go into your sofrito?

-Lucy

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You missing your MIL's cooking STInGER?? I remember you had quite a feast!! How's the ankle...its got to be better by now. :laugh:

I'm missing soft shell crabs and that's absolutely killing me!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! :sad:

Cheers

Tom

PS I'm walking on it again - only small twinges of full blown pain :biggrin:

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Good Morning!

I had an entertaining ride to work today. Monday was sort of chilly and raw, and most people were dressed in shades of winter grey and black. By Wednesday, there were shots of turquoise and hot pink walking around. But, today was all about the color purple. NYU has their graduation today, and there were flocks of purple robed students descending on Washington Sq. Park. The air was charged with pride, hope, expectation and celebration, and the spirit was contagious.

A bit further uptown, as I got to Herald Sq., there was a large red and gold balloon arch over a sign announcing: THE WORLD'S LARGEST LATTE. McDonalds is debuting a new latte inspired beverage. i6789.jpg. And their partner in this venture is...Coffeemate! i6790.jpg

Why does McDonalds feel the need to supersize everything? What is the appeal in seeing the world's largest latte? Why do they feel the need to synthesize everything(Coffeemate)? Even the music was synthesized! I think Italy should re-possess the word latte (and cappucino) as the French have possession of the word champagne. End of rant.

What I really wanted to do this morning was an "Ode to the Donut".

"mmmm.....donuts." -Homer Simpson

Most mornings, we have coffee and a bite at Balthazar's. Its not the same as the, "can't get a dinner reservation until 11:00" Balthazar, this is the breakfast club Balthazar. There is a group of regulars there, same as you would find in any small town coffee shop/bar-tabac/piazza. Kisses and hugs from a waitress returning from a weeks vacation, coffee that's made just the way you like it and you don't even have to order it, they just bring it.

A few weeks ago, they started bringing donuts that had been made at Schiller's Liquor Bar. Now, in the time honored tradition of drug dealers everywhere, they gave out some free samples. It was an awesome, instant addicition. You know you shouldn't eat them, but they aren't that big, I won't eat them tommorow, they smell pretty good, just one bite, some extra crunches at the gym. Complete denial that you are in the grip of additction.

Now Schiller's isn't serving breakfast, so they are making them at Balthazar; and although there is some debate on whether there should be sugar on the outside, they remain the perfect donut. There is the perfect carmel color, the perfect crunch around the donut hole, the soft cruller like interior, and the aroma of ....donuts..... i6788.jpg


Edited by hathor (log)

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Hathor, have you thought about brining your turkey? That ought to add sufficient moisture to help it if it's baked.

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By Wednesday, there were shots of turquoise and hot pink walking around

Bright colors? They must be visiting from someplace else. :raz:

i6788.jpg

Those look delish. Now I want a second breakfast. :laugh:


Edited by bloviatrix (log)

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Why does McDonalds feel the need to supersize everything? What is the appeal in seeing the world's largest latte? Why do they feel the need to synthesize everything(Coffeemate)? Even the music was synthesized!  I think Italy should re-possess the word latte (and cappucino) as the French have possession of the word champagne. End of rant.

Hear, hear Hathor.

To make a 'supersize' 'grande' 'vente' or whatever companies like McD's call them implies either a horrendous (but quite enticing :laugh: ) amount of espresso in the drink, or diluting it with excessive amounts of milk. To get any taste (i.e. using milk with a high cream content) one will be consuming a LOT of fat.

Going down that route would mean the nation in question would end up with large numbers of obese...oh...wait...hang on a minute....

....ahem

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glad to help. we didn't have trouble posting our pictures from safari but we were also hosting the pictures elsewhere.

everything looks and sounds so delicious, even the stuff i can't eat. i'm deadly allergic to shellfish.

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To make a 'supersize' 'grande' 'vente' or whatever companies like McD's call them implies either a horrendous (but quite enticing  ) amount of espresso in the drink, or diluting it with excessive amounts of milk. To get any taste (i.e. using milk with a high cream content) one will be consuming a LOT of fat.

It's really quite appalling - Starbucks has already bastardized the concept of a properly made cappuccino or latte but now Mickey D's will complete the destruction. At least the 'bucks raised the bar for coffee quality in general by making people aware of the world beyond Folger's, Maxwell House et al.

The pictures of the banner with Coffeemate was a real gag-me moment - I just walked into the breakroom at work and noticed that the new Coffeemate packaging (which is like that shown in your picture) has a delicious recipe for makign "real" whipped topping using Coffemate and cold skim milk. Yum.

I typically have one cappa/latte each morning that contains 3.5 - 4 oz of espresso and about 10 - 12 oz of 1% milk. Even that limited consumption has me calculating fat grams. It's a good thing summer is coming - I can switch to iced drinks with less milk and drop the fat content to 1/2% (but then I'll drink twice as many!).

BTW, yes he swears it's really a turkey.

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It's really quite appalling - Starbucks has already bastardized the concept of a properly made cappuccino or latte but now Mickey D's will complete the destruction. At least the 'bucks raised the bar for coffee quality in general by making people aware of the world beyond Folger's, Maxwell House et al.

The pictures of the banner with Coffeemate was a real gag-me moment - I just walked into the breakroom at work and noticed that the new Coffeemate packaging (which is like that shown in your picture) has a delicious recipe for makign "real" whipped topping using Coffemate and cold skim milk. Yum.

I typically have one cappa/latte each morning that contains 3.5 - 4 oz of espresso and about 10 - 12 oz of 1% milk. Even that limited consumption has me calculating fat grams. It's a good thing summer is coming - I can switch to iced drinks with less milk and drop the fat content to 1/2% (but then I'll drink twice as many!).

BTW, yes he swears it's really a turkey.

You KNOW I was thinking of you when I was standing there! :wink: Its so depressing. Why can't any of these corporations think out of the box...for just one minute??

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I'm just getting a chance to catch up on the questions and comments...you know, that pesky day-job thing....

Bleudavergne: I was as intrigued as you were by the lambs quarter name. Unfortunately the woman minding the stand was wet, warm and a bit cranky at the end of the day, so the conversation didn't go too far. I thought lamb...something was another name for mache. But this green isn't shaped like that at all, and its stronger flavored.

No herbs in the sofrito: just celery, carrots, and onion sweated for a bit. Then I added the garlic, chili pepper and the herbs (rosemary, thyme, sage). Doesn't it then get another name after the herbs are added, something like affamato (??).

Mabelline: hi! Yes, I am definetely going to brine the bird, maybe with some juniper berries. Especially after its been frozen. I don't think I have a choice except to roast it...its just too big!

Keifel: sorry about the shellfish allergy..that would be just awful for me. I have my own chocolate cross to bear!

Bainesy: all that McD lip service about now having salads just makes me want to wretch. Although I don't think that the obese women who sued McD should have won, you would think that with all that's going on in regard to "Supersize", reduced market share, depressed profits, that just maybe someone would have a clue. Oh well. There was resurrected thread yesterday that talks about culture and obesity.

edited because I cannot proofread!


Edited by hathor (log)

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