Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Sign in to follow this  
hathor

eG Foodblog: hathor - Big Apple Blog

Recommended Posts

Is that a really giant cutting board or do you have butcher block counter tops? I am thinking of replacing mine with butcher blocks (I can get them very cheap) and was just wondering.


Brooks Hamaker, aka "Mayhaw Man"

There's a train everyday, leaving either way...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Is that a really giant cutting board or do you have butcher block counter tops? I am thinking of replacing mine with butcher blocks (I can get them very cheap) and was just wondering.

hathor's looks like a countertop. My main work surface in my kitchen is a 2" edge grain oak countertop. I LOVE IT. I have also made 2 others for friends kitchens and have had the same response. If you keep them properly fed with oil they will last forever and are a great work surface. I have hung an undercounter mounted prep sink in mine and the overspray does no damage if kept oiled.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh, the dumplings! I have been craving them and there they are... What a lovely dinner.


Victoria Raschke, aka ms. victoria

Eat Your Heart Out: food memories, recipes, rants and reviews

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
My main work surface in my kitchen is a 2" edge grain oak countertop. I LOVE IT. I have also made 2 others for friends kitchens and have had the same response. If you keep them properly fed with oil they will last forever and are a great work surface. I have hung an undercounter mounted prep sink in mine and the overspray does no damage if kept oiled.

Yeah, I have pretty much decided to go in that direction. I live in an old farmhouse and they would fit with all of the other beat up wood that this place consists of. :wacko:

We had them in a house in New Orleans and I really liked them. The cost is minimal as the linear footage of the countertops is really quite small as the whole kitchen is built around a 4X6 island (with a sink and a very strange, but handy, high btu double burner) covered in corian (I think it was originally wood, but got recovered with the corian, which I have actually come to like).


Brooks Hamaker, aka "Mayhaw Man"

There's a train everyday, leaving either way...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Does anyone remember Adelle Davis' books about slowwww cooking of foods. I think she cooked turkey at like 175* for many many hours...I need to look her up.

Paula Wolfert makes reference to Davis in her latest book, The Slow Mediterranean Kitchen (eGullet credit link).

Wolfert is an admirer of Davis' work, but she cautions against using some of Davis' methods today, because some of these slow cooking techniques can result in massive bacterial growth. Some of the recipes in Wolfert's book attempt to get Davis' results without some of the dangers.

Edit: I'm loving the blog, by the way.


Edited by SethG (log)

"I don't mean to brag, I don't mean to boast;

but we like hot butter on our breakfast toast!"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Is that a really giant cutting board or do you have butcher block counter tops? I am thinking of replacing mine with butcher blocks (I can get them very cheap) and was just wondering.

I have a portion of the counter that is butcher block, in the city and in Westchester. Highly recommend at least a portion of the counter be in wood. Its pretty easy to maintain, and oh, so easy to work on.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Does anyone remember Adelle Davis' books about slowwww cooking of foods. I think she cooked turkey at like 175* for many many hours...I need to look her up.

Paula Wolfert makes reference to Davis in her latest book, The Slow Mediterranean Kitchen (eGullet credit link).

Wolfert is an admirer of Davis' work, but she cautions against using some of Davis' methods today, because some of these slow cooking techniques can result in massive bacterial growth. Some of the recipes in Wolfert's book attempt to get Davis' results without some of the dangers.

Edit: I'm loving the blog, by the way.

I'm glad you referenced that because I was thinking the same thing about fowl at 175 degrees. Chicken/fowl bacteria can be pretty nasty, and with a wild turkey...well, you just don't know where its been!

P.S. Thanks for the support!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Does anyone remember Adelle Davis' books about slowwww cooking of foods. I think she cooked turkey at like 175* for many many hours...I need to look her up.

Paula Wolfert makes reference to Davis in her latest book, The Slow Mediterranean Kitchen (eGullet credit link).

Wolfert is an admirer of Davis' work, but she cautions against using some of Davis' methods today, because some of these slow cooking techniques can result in massive bacterial growth. Some of the recipes in Wolfert's book attempt to get Davis' results without some of the dangers.

Edit: I'm loving the blog, by the way.

I'm glad you referenced that because I was thinking the same thing about fowl at 175 degrees. Chicken/fowl bacteria can be pretty nasty, and with a wild turkey...well, you just don't know where its been!

P.S. Thanks for the support!!

I think that the argument that wild turkey (the food, not the whiskey) is probably a much safer bird to eat than a pen raised bird is pretty easy to make.

No antibiotics. No Growth Hormones. No cross contamination of feed. No living in unclean conditions. The chain of evidence is much easier to follow as well, since you know who has handled the bird all the way down the line.

The only unsafe part would be how the bird is handled and subsequently frozen and thawed. As long as safe practices are followed concerning chicken/fowl bacteria, I wouldn't give it another thought.


Brooks Hamaker, aka "Mayhaw Man"

There's a train everyday, leaving either way...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I thought that if it was heated past 160* that killed the 'bugs'. But you can always raise the temp when it's time for your browning. Shoot, don't use that wonderful looking bird for a lab experiment... get a silkie and try it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Is that a really giant cutting board or do you have butcher block counter tops? I am thinking of replacing mine with butcher blocks (I can get them very cheap) and was just wondering.

I have a portion of the counter that is butcher block, in the city and in Westchester. Highly recommend at least a portion of the counter be in wood. Its pretty easy to maintain, and oh, so easy to work on.

Yes, I love my little bit of bb counter - only wish there were more of it. Only problem with it is that it's old and was obviously not properly maintained by the previous administration; the surface isn't quite even. One board needs to be planed, another filled, or something. Add it to the long list of things I hope to Get Around To one of these days.

Hathor, your dinner last night is just beautiful (I too am tempted to play copy-cat with the pork chops), and I'm wildly jealous of your foray to the Dynasty market. I think I'll have to make an Expotition into town.

(Hey, someone suggested a Dynasty-based pot luck up-thread. I wonder if that could be done in conjunction with the Recipe Smackdown thing Maggie posted last night? Any interest, New Yorkers?)

I'm curious about your cioppino, which also looked lovely. We used to make a very different, more peasanty version, with a much more stewish feel to it. I think the recipe came from Sunset some 30 years ago, but I might just be misremembering, since I haven't actually used a recipe in nearly that long. I've always been amused by the derivation - or apparent lack thereof. As in the 19th century everyone disclaimed VD (the English called it the French Pox, the French called it the Spanish Pox, the Spanish called it the English Pox...), so it appears that despite the Italian name the Italians describe cioppino as Portuguese Bouillabaisse, the Portuguese describe it as San Francisco Bouillabaisse... and so on. I haven't lived in San Francisco since I was about 10, but I gather that it is something of a signature dish there now, probably in a form similar to the one we used to make (which is probably why I think it came from Sunset). Yours is a lot more elegant in look and composition. Whence cometh it?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I thought that if it was heated past 160* that killed the 'bugs'. But you can always raise the temp when it's time for your browning. Shoot, don't use that wonderful looking bird for a lab experiment... get a silkie and try it.

I could not agree more... I'll experiment on the $5.00 bird!

And I was sort of kidding about not knowing where the turkey has been. That is something else that I completely agree with: I'll go organic, free range and wild whenever it is feasible, practical and possible. I seriously avoid endangered fish, and do my best to be a responsible and aware eater.

I also think that we should respect where the meat comes from, meaning: it didn't just show up wrapped in plastic in the refrigerator aisle. I have a problem with people who eat meat, but don't want to 'know the gory details'. There is a lovely description of a hunter who looks into the eye of his deer and thanks it...wonder if I can dig it up. Being a carnivore entails respect.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Wolfert is an admirer of Davis' work, but she cautions against using some of Davis' methods today, because some of these slow cooking techniques can result in massive bacterial growth.  Some of the recipes in Wolfert's book attempt to get Davis' results without some of the dangers.

I admire Wolfert, but I'm always a little suspicious, on general principle, of cautions against bacteria. I mean, why "today"? Did Adelle Davis, or the people cooking according to her recipes, experience ill effects? There has been plenty of discussion elsewhere on this board about how we've decreased our own immunity by overprotecting ourselves with things like over-prescribed antibiotics and anti-bacterial soap and generally exaggerated notions of hygiene. So when I hear something like this, I can't help wondering: was it OK 30 years ago? and have we weakened ourselves so drastically and so quickly that it's that much more dangerous now?

I remember going to visit boarding schools in the early 70s; at one of them which was particularly earthy-crunchy, we were proudly shown through the school's much-vaunted Macrobiotic Kitchen, which was largely student-run. I've rarely seen anything more disgustingly filthy in my life. OTOH... while I couldn't stand to have or to work in a kitchen like that, didn't even want to set foot in that one - I have to admit that the students seemed perfectly healthy, and so far as I know there were never any problems there with food poisoning or any of the other ills you'd expect the flesh to be heir to.

I did not go to that school, for several reasons. And while I've never regretted the choice I did make (on the contrary, I rank it as one of the best of my life to date), I wonder whether the standard institutional fare we got there served us any better from a nutritional standpoint than those other kids got from their grubby grains? Seems to me we're all the better for some nice healthy dirt and some good clean germs.

Course, what do I know? Not a whole lot about bacteria and such, that's for sure. Maybe some of Adelle Davis's stuff really is potentially lethal and it's just the luck of the draw that in its heyday it never set off a poisoning scandal and a class action for liability. But I continue to wonder.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
There is a lovely description of a hunter who looks into the eye of his deer and thanks it...wonder if I can dig it up. Being a carnivore entails respect.

Isn't that kind of a classic Native American notion? Inuit too, if memory serves; a ritual that is part of the seal and whale hunts. Either you and I have read the same thing or - I seem to remember running across this sort of thing more than once. Seems only reasonable to thank the animal that's going to feed and clothe and warm your tribe through the coming season. I think in some situations you also apologize to your brother the deer/bear/seal etc. for having to kill him in order to accomplish those necessary things. Very civilized - much more so than neat little plastic packages, really. It is all too easy, in our convenience-crazed world, to confuse industrialization with civilization, without thinking about their etymology and real meaning.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
(Hey, someone suggested a Dynasty-based pot luck up-thread. I wonder if that could be done in conjunction with the Recipe Smackdown thing Maggie posted last night? Any interest, New Yorkers?)

Now, I am quite put out with Tennessee's lack of proximity to New York. (I just noticed there really isn't an appropriate pouty face smilie...)


Victoria Raschke, aka ms. victoria

Eat Your Heart Out: food memories, recipes, rants and reviews

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Is that a really giant cutting board or do you have butcher block counter tops? I am thinking of replacing mine with butcher blocks (I can get them very cheap) and was just wondering.

I have a portion of the counter that is butcher block, in the city and in Westchester. Highly recommend at least a portion of the counter be in wood. Its pretty easy to maintain, and oh, so easy to work on.

Yes, I love my little bit of bb counter - only wish there were more of it. Only problem with it is that it's old and was obviously not properly maintained by the previous administration; the surface isn't quite even. One board needs to be planed, another filled, or something. Add it to the long list of things I hope to Get Around To one of these days.

Hathor, your dinner last night is just beautiful (I too am tempted to play copy-cat with the pork chops), and I'm wildly jealous of your foray to the Dynasty market. I think I'll have to make an Expotition into town.

(Hey, someone suggested a Dynasty-based pot luck up-thread. I wonder if that could be done in conjunction with the Recipe Smackdown thing Maggie posted last night? Any interest, New Yorkers?)

I'm curious about your cioppino, which also looked lovely. We used to make a very different, more peasanty version, with a much more stewish feel to it. I think the recipe came from Sunset some 30 years ago, but I might just be misremembering, since I haven't actually used a recipe in nearly that long. I've always been amused by the derivation - or apparent lack thereof. As in the 19th century everyone disclaimed VD (the English called it the French Pox, the French called it the Spanish Pox, the Spanish called it the English Pox...), so it appears that despite the Italian name the Italians describe cioppino as Portuguese Bouillabaisse, the Portuguese describe it as San Francisco Bouillabaisse... and so on. I haven't lived in San Francisco since I was about 10, but I gather that it is something of a signature dish there now, probably in a form similar to the one we used to make (which is probably why I think it came from Sunset). Yours is a lot more elegant in look and composition. Whence cometh it?

Hello! Sorry for the slow reply...me e-mail notification is just a bit 'quirky"...but it could very well be the firewall.

Thanks for the compliments on dinner! I'm not that much of an Asian cook, we live too close to Chinatown, and we spent a lot of time in HK/China..and they do it a lot better than I do. But, when you have all those raw ingredients in front of you, its hard not to get inspired.

I think I mentioned the pot luck, it would certainly be an interesting experiment to have a bunch of eG'er wandering around Dynasty, and then seeing what we come up with!

As far as the cioppino goes... its just based off of something I ate in San Francisco a long time ago. I have no idea of the 'authenticy' of my version, it just depends on what looks good in the market. I would imagine there as many variations on cioppino as there are on bouillabaise.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[isn't that kind of a classic Native American notion? Inuit too, if memory serves; a ritual that is part of the seal and whale hunts.

Honestly, I have no idea if its Native American, Inuit or Pagan. It just seems common sense to me to accept the responsiblity and knowledge of what goes into your mouth. I think many cultures that are not so far removed or antiseptic in their approach to food understand this concept.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I thought that if it was heated past 160* that killed the 'bugs'. But you can always raise the temp when it's time for your browning.

This is what I've always thought, too. Maybe Paula will drop in and set us straight as to what her opinion is.


"I don't mean to brag, I don't mean to boast;

but we like hot butter on our breakfast toast!"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I think that the argument that wild turkey (the food, not the whiskey) is probably a much safer bird to eat than a pen raised bird is pretty easy to make.

No antibiotics. No Growth Hormones. No cross contamination of feed. No living in unclean conditions. The chain of evidence is much easier to follow as well, since you know who has handled the bird all the way down the line.

The only unsafe part would be how the bird is handled and subsequently frozen and thawed. As long as safe practices are followed concerning chicken/fowl bacteria, I wouldn't give it another thought.

I have to agree with Brooks on this point. The super germs come from infractions in industrial operations after slaughter. Wild game is much healthier on average than box raised as well.

Which is a reason to consider choosing very carefully the meat you use in a slow low temp braise situation. Your hunted bird would be a the leading candidate for the ride in the slow cooker in my opinion.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Back to 'order up' lunch today, no strolls in Bryant Park... I tried to get my lunch-mates interested in Han Bot, Pan's suggestion upthread, but no luck. Seems there was concern about just how much meat would be on an ox knee. I didn't realize oxes had knees! So, it was a grilled portobello sandwich with some very tasty brown fries. No vino for lunch...just some seltzer and Snapple. Watcha gonna do? Once again the pesky day job interferes with the pursuit of happiness! :wink:

i6859.jpg

P.S. Lunch mate is very concerned with my taking pictures of lunch...she described it as a cult as well. What do these people know??? :laugh:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
i6859.jpg

Is that a placemat under your plate? If so, I'm impressed with your work formality.


"Some people see a sheet of seaweed and want to be wrapped in it. I want to see it around a piece of fish."-- William Grimes

"People are bastard-coated bastards, with bastard filling." - Dr. Cox on Scrubs

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You could always say about this being a cult that at least taking pictures is a lot easier than having to shave your hair :laugh:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[s that a placemat under your plate? If so, I'm impressed with your work formality.

We spend a lot of time at the office, and decided we would like to dine well, or as well as possible, so we bought some plates, glasses, silverware and placemats. It makes us feel much more civilized!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
You could always say about this being a cult that at least taking pictures is a lot easier than having to shave your hair :laugh:

What do you mean we don't have to shave our hair??? No one told me it was a joke... I thought that part in the users agreement was 'for real'!!! :laugh:


Edited by hathor (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[s that a placemat under your plate?  If so, I'm impressed with your work formality.

We spend a lot of time at the office, and decided we would like to dine well, or as well as possible, so we bought some plates, glasses, silverware and placemats. It makes us feel much more civilized!

You mean a plastic container from the corner deli isn't the height of civilization? :raz: Damn, and I thought I was so classy. :laugh:


"Some people see a sheet of seaweed and want to be wrapped in it. I want to see it around a piece of fish."-- William Grimes

"People are bastard-coated bastards, with bastard filling." - Dr. Cox on Scrubs

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
Sign in to follow this  

  • Similar Content

    • By Panaderia Canadiense
      Hello again from south of the equator!  As you may or may not have heard (because the international news media isn't really giving the situation much coverage), Ecuador is in the grip of a major social protest movement.  This started on October 1, when fuel subsidies in the country were abruptly struck causing the prices of gasoline and diesel to more than double overnight.  Transport and heavy haulage unions immediately went on strike, and blocked the main roads of the cities with their vehicles in protest.  The indigenous movements of the central Sierra, beginning in my province, Tungurahua, joined the strike on October 2, and the President quickly declared a State of Emergency that restricts movement, freedom of the press, and freedom association.  The indigenous took over the road blockades on October 3, cutting the cities off from the world; Ambato became an island overnight.
       
      It is now October 8, one week into the blockades.  Shortages in the fresh markets and supermarkets began on Sunday, as people realized that we were in for a long-haul of protest and possibly an overthrow of the sitting government.  Ecuador's indigenous have a long history of deposing governments in this way, and it's not a fast process.
       
      I'll be blogging informally throughout the National Strike, to document how the inevitable food shortages affect the city and my own table. 
       
      These first pictures are from Sunday, October 6.  In the Mercado Mayorista, a place I've always taken you along to when I've blogged from Ambato, the cement floors of the naves are visible in places where they have never, in my experience, been exposed.  The fresh corn nave is all but abandoned - this is because all of the corn in the city's stock has been sold.  I'll remind you: a nave in this market is about a thousand square metres of space.  This is also missing the big trucks that come to trade fresh grains in the parking lot, because they couldn't make it through the roadblocks.  Most of the Mayorista is in the same situation - stocks are selling off fast.

       
      The supermarkets are even more dire.  The meat coolers are completely empty, and the produce shelves are diminishing quickly.



       
    • By Kerry Beal
      @Alleguede and I are in the lounge at Pearson awaiting our flight to Vegas for the IBIE (International Baking Industry Exhibition).
       
      I got the usually bomb sniffing swab done on my electronics - @Alleguede got the 3rd degree at customs. Anyone know what a carnet is? I believe I got that lecture the last time.
       

       
      Made myself a little cocktail, Maker's Mark, Grand Marnier, vintage port. I've had better! 
       

       
      Not a lot of choices to eat since it's rather late (not that earlier would have helped) - they also have pasta salad, Italian Wedding soup, Cream of mushroom soup, corn chips and salsa. There appear to be some cookies there as well. I'm trying to low carb as much as possible so I'm avoiding most of it.
       

       
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
    • By ElsieD
      Host's note: the initial title of this thread was "Swarvin' in ???"  as a teaser.  Once the destination was identified as Newfoundland, the title was changed to reflect this.  The initial comments were based on the ??? In the title.
       
       
      And we'll soon be off.......culinary adventures to follow.

    • By ElsieD
      Some of you may recall that in 2016 I had a blog about our trip to Newfoundland.  We are going there again tomorrow for a week, returning July 1 and I thought that since we are going to, and eating at, places different from that year, I would do another blog.  When I booked our flights and accommodations (7 places in 8 nights) last February, June 23rd seemed like a long ways away.  Yet here we are, about to leave.   I hope some of you will follow along as we travel through the province.    
    • By Smithy
      As times and available resources have changed, members have started their own food/travel blogs. These are not listed in the eG Foodblogs index below. You can find them, though, by searching with the tag "foodblog". The tag search box is near the upper right corner of the Forums Main Page. It looks like this:
       

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...