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hathor

eG Foodblog: hathor - Big Apple Blog

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Does anyone remember Adelle Davis' books about slowwww cooking of foods. I think she cooked turkey at like 175* for many many hours...I need to look her up.

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I don't think that the obese women who sued McD should have won, you would think that with all that's going on in regard to "Supersize", reduced market share, depressed profits, that just maybe someone would have a clue. Oh well. There was resurrected thread yesterday that talks about culture and obesity.

edited because I cannot proofread!

I think someone probably does have a clue.

Maybe he/she isn't not high enough on the food chain there to do anything,

and there's not enough others with clues, and maybe lots of company politics. Plus to try to get a company the size of McD's to do anything requires fighting through lots of institutional inertia.

Maybe something is in the works.

Not that I really care that much.


Herb aka "herbacidal"

Tom is not my friend.

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My husband took me to lunch...and I'm not telling you anything about it (execpt I did have some grilled octopus :biggrin: )

:shock: Right on. A blog isn't a guarantee that we get ALL the juicy details! :biggrin:

FWIW, I post photos using Safari (& ImageGullet) all the time & haven't had any trouble. I do create the JPEGs using Photshop's "Save for Web" function, which makes the downsizing seamless. That may make a difference.

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My husband took me to lunch...and I'm not telling you anything about it (execpt I did have some grilled octopus :biggrin: )

Are you implying that you had dessert first? :wink::biggrin:

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Do you ever take your lunch to Bryant Park and eat there? That was one of best parts of having an office on 40th & 5th in my corporate days.


"Some people see a sheet of seaweed and want to be wrapped in it. I want to see it around a piece of fish."-- William Grimes

"People are bastard-coated bastards, with bastard filling." - Dr. Cox on Scrubs

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We walked thru there this afternoon... :rolleyes: We wanted to check on the plantings as they really are spectacular, but it was a little early, there was lots of stuff in pots waiting to go in the ground. Where you around there when it was a seedy no man's land?? What an amazing transformation.

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We walked thru there this afternoon... :rolleyes: We wanted to check on the plantings as they really are spectacular, but it was a little early, there was lots of stuff in pots waiting to go in the ground. Where you around there when it was a seedy no man's land?? What an amazing transformation.

It was already an oasis in the middle of the city when I got there. Eating lunch there was a great way to recharge one's batteries in the middle of a stressful day. But I remember what the park was like in the 80s and it wasn't pretty.

The carousel is one of my favorite additions. Its so charming.


"Some people see a sheet of seaweed and want to be wrapped in it. I want to see it around a piece of fish."-- William Grimes

"People are bastard-coated bastards, with bastard filling." - Dr. Cox on Scrubs

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I went to a 1920s garden party wedding. It was perfect: carousel, lovely hats, everything. Though it was held at Chattanooga's waterfront park rather than in New York. I like the Mary Poppins idea... what a great party theme.


Victoria Raschke, aka ms. victoria

Eat Your Heart Out: food memories, recipes, rants and reviews

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I I like the Mary Poppins idea... what a great party theme.

Bear in mind, this is not so creative coming from someone who can say 'supercalifragilisticexpealidous' backwards...!! :laugh:

Right about now, a mint julep would be refreshing.... think I"ll check the beverage forum....

edited for spelling...


Edited by hathor (log)

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Went to the gym, but my trainer and I missed each, I thought he went to a fight...blah, blah. The upshot was I was able to head back over the bridge and to Chinatown before the shops closed.

I discovered Mecca. i6817.jpg. Its a large grocery store called Dynasty on the corner of Hester St. As you walk in..there is a wall of live Dungeness crab, cheap. Lobsters, live talapia, and groupers. Bins of dried oysters, violet colored sea cucumbers. Then the meat dept: goat legs, goat bellies, pork muscle, pork picnic (really, it was a cut called pork picnic, looked like an enormous pork chop), black skinned silkie chickens, partridge, ducks, flattened chickens and on and on. I was like a kid in a candy store. Bags of 'fried sea trout' pieces that looked like white curled styrofoam strips. And the best security guard, he looked like he was about 6 feet tall, black man, possibly Caribbean, he had that cool, island vibe going on, and he's chatting up the four foot high Chinese ladies is Cantonese. He was great!

This would be a great eGullet outing: everyone goes to Dynasty for ingredients and then have a pot luck dinner.

Speaking of..time for me to make dinner. Everyone's hungry.

Ciao!


Edited by hathor (log)

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Dynasty inspired dinner:

ginger, lime, chili, sesame, soy pork chops

pork/vegetable dumplings

sauteed pea shoots (really good)

lamb quarter salad...I wasn't so keen on it, but everyone else liked it, a little too 'chewy' without enough flavor for me.

And a very yummy Brutucao merlot!

i6841.jpg


Edited by hathor (log)

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Looks pretty good! Were those wine glasses already drained or were they simply primed?


John Sconzo, M.D. aka "docsconz"

"Remember that a very good sardine is always preferable to a not that good lobster."

- Ferran Adria on eGullet 12/16/2004.

Docsconz - Musings on Food and Life

Slow Food Saratoga Region - Co-Founder

Twitter - @docsconz

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My husband took me to lunch...and I'm not telling you anything about it (execpt I did have some grilled octopus  :biggrin: )

:shock: Right on. A blog isn't a guarantee that we get ALL the juicy details! :biggrin:

FWIW, I post photos using Safari (& ImageGullet) all the time & haven't had any trouble. I do create the JPEGs using Photshop's "Save for Web" function, which makes the downsizing seamless. That may make a difference.

I use a program I got off of the net thanks to Ronnie Suburban (I think) called pixresizer. It's free and it works. Even I can do this with something approaching seamless grace, so I am pretty sure that a world traveling, urban dweller such as yourself might find it a piece of cake. Pretty much the hardest part is clicking. The rest is more or less done automatically. As a general tool it might be kind of limiting, but for reducing stuff for web posting or insertion into web pages it is great.

What's up with the turkey? Any decisions yet?

Edited to say: What a fine repast. That stuff looks delicious!


Brooks Hamaker, aka "Mayhaw Man"

There's a train everyday, leaving either way...

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Hi, hathor... although the skin 'sticks' a little tighter on a wild turkey, are you going to slip some herbed butter up under it? That always helps with dry roasting. Or some good stock in the pan,and a tinfoil tent over to protect the easily burned parts? Don't mind my rambling, just trying to give you a lot of options.

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Hi, hathor... although the skin 'sticks' a little tighter on a wild turkey, are you going to slip some herbed butter up under it? That always helps with dry roasting. Or some good stock in the pan,and a tinfoil tent over to protect the easily burned parts? Don't mind my rambling, just trying to give you a lot of options.

Thanks! The more info the better. Once we nail down a date, I'll start giving it some serious thought...right now, I still haven't gotten beyond the brining bit.

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Okay, Okay, Hold On a sec!

ginger, lime, chili, sesame, soy pork chops

Ummm, this looks fantabulous so I have to make it. Hathor, if you could confirm/correct for me: did you marinate your chops in lime juice/soy/chili for a bit first? Cook at high heat w/fresh ginger +some marinade, finish in oven then drizzle sesame oil before serving???

Something like that? :rolleyes:


"I took the habit of asking Pierre to bring me whatever looks good today and he would bring out the most wonderful things," - bleudauvergne

foodblogs: Dining Downeast I - Dining Downeast II

Portland Food Map.com

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Bleudauvergne: thanks! I was thinking of you when I was in the Dynasty market...you would have gone on sensory overload! So much to puzzle over, like why were the sea cucumber violet? And what is a silkie chicken? It was about the size of a guinea fowl, but with black skin. I've been in plenty of Asian markets, but this one was very impressive. With all the strange cuts of meat, and all the bits and pieces that were there, you have to wonder, what was the stuff that they didn't translate???

Quick juice this morning. i6650.jpg

and then a ride in the fog. Its cool and misty out, quite nice after this week's sultry heat.

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And what is a silkie chicken?

A Silkie is a specific breed of chicken that is prized for its feathers. Here in TN where we actually have chickens shows it is one of the most prized breeds. The chickens are washed, feathers blown dry, then combed (similiar to a horse) and then presented for judging. There are various colors and subsets in the breed. One of my employees is very into show chickens so this information comes from him

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And what is a silkie chicken?

A Silkie is a specific breed of chicken that is prized for its feathers. Here in TN where we actually have chickens shows it is one of the most prized breeds. The chickens are washed, feathers blown dry, then combed (similiar to a horse) and then presented for judging. There are various colors and subsets in the breed. One of my employees is very into show chickens so this information comes from him

Right you are! I googled them up, and it seems they are docile and suitable for women and children.

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