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Molded and Filled Chocolates: Troubleshooting and Techniques


rookie
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I have had one absolutely fabulous cocoa butter sent to me by a bean to bar fellow who wanted me to figure out the best temperature to set the EZtemper - it smelled like the richest chocolate ever. Definitely not something you'd want to spread on your skin or you'd be hungry all day!

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Hi folks:  

 

Would anyone be able to help me diagnose the following (see pictures, empty mold, and turned out chocolates)

I sprayed the molds CB, they sat around for a good couple of days before I added tempered white chocolate. Filled them, capped them and you can see by the pictures, most of the cocoa butter stayed in the mold. I warmed the CB in the microwave, shook like mad, warmed some more, and then popped it into the sprayer. Any ideas? Thanks!2018-05-25_13-05-26_774.thumb.jpeg.9500624eadc09a4a7eb21a7b507bfd0a.jpeg2018-05-25_13-03-13_426.thumb.jpeg.1304f9a86966c62c1a2f85d9000eacec.jpeg

Edited by SweetandSnappyJen (log)
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2 hours ago, SweetandSnappyJen said:

Hi folks:  

 

Would anyone be able to help me diagnose the following (see pictures, empty mold, and turned out chocolates)

I sprayed the molds CB, they sat around for a good couple of days before I added tempered white chocolate. Filled them, capped them and you can see by the pictures, most of the cocoa butter stayed in the mold. I warmed the CB in the microwave, shook like mad, warmed some more, and then popped it into the sprayer. Any ideas? Thanks!

 

So many possibilities but I would hone in on the fact that you let it sit around a couple of days. You certainly can do that but if you room temperature is fluctuating during that time you're asking for trouble. Of course the either the cocoa butter or the white could have just not been in temper to begin with. I would start again and try to control the variables one at a time.

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The cocoa butter that did come out looks nice and shiny - so I'm suspicious that your white chocolate might have been too cold when you put it in the mold. 

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Thanks for the replies! They mostly dropped out, I did have to tap them a bit. I have a sneaking suspicion it was the temperature, that I tried to unmould them to soon. After those came out ruined, I tried my next mould of milk chocolate, and the two that came out, were also duds. But then I put them back in the fridge for a few hours and they came out perfectly. It *couldve* been the white chocolate, because my other mould of white, which did not have colored cocoa butter but did have a thin layer of brushed cocoa butter,  also came out dull. 

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  • 2 months later...

Ok... I’m now a convert. I decided to wash my molds with soap and buff the water out with a cotton ball (because of the calcium content in my water) and I have to say the chocolates do come out pretty shiny! Here’s a couple photos. And it cuts my cleaning time in half so I’m pumped!E64AA345-F916-42C9-864A-0D731DBD9783.thumb.jpeg.698c1bb6c35b3696cc16e7e014f374b3.jpeg00216C96-82AE-4DBB-B69A-440A3369177A.thumb.jpeg.2e34cd2bfb7431216755b209d0a6831e.jpeg

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Curious case that I could use some help with. So, I was getting ready to fill a decorated mold, and accidentally filled an empty mold (don't know where my mind was). The mold was clean - I had just washed, alcoholed and re-wiped with a dry new cosmetic pad. It was clean and dry. For sure. Realizing what I had done I ploughed ahead and filled it (cardamom caramel and Rawandan espresso ganache). When I popped them out, they released immediately and had an appropriate shine - the temper was spot on...so was the other decorated tray which came from the same piping bag. I don't do plain brown chocolates so I went for the save by doing a gold luster white chocolate button and texture sheet. But here's the thing...they're sticky. Every one of them.There's no seepage. They're completely solid and crisp (I ate one to perform r&d). My kitchen runs a dehumidifier 24/7 at is holding steady at 35% like it always does. So what do you think happened? Why would the exterior be sticky?

Goldbutton.thumb.jpg.43f549850bcb041cbf8b71664997e994.jpg

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I’ve had that happen before inconsistently. I think it has been caramels if I’m not mistaken.   And I think it has been dark chocolate.

Edited by Kerry Beal (log)
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10 minutes ago, Kerry Beal said:

I’ve had that happen before inconsistently. I think it has been caramels if I’m not mistaken.   And I think it has been dark chocolate.

 

Yes and yes in my instance. Why and more importantly how?

 

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58 minutes ago, understandingcocoa said:

@gfron1 Were these left to set in the fridge? I've had this on exposed chocolate i.e. bars when i've left them in too long, or truffles have sometimes developed a sticky sheen after tap out due to being left too long in the cold (I have the memory of goldfish) 

No. These didn't spend any time in the fridge. I keep my room colder than most (19º) but that's a far cry from my fridge.

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5 hours ago, Daniel D said:

@gfron1 are the shells on the plain bonbons significantly thinner than the shells on your other painted pieces? That’s the only thing I could think of since you said you didn’t refrigerate and hit the dew point.

They weren't. In fact, they were a bit thicker than normal. I'm glad I'm not crazy for not knowing what happened.

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  • 1 year later...

Hello everyone!

 

I was wondering if someone could give me a link to a thread where I could put my bon bon questions and troubleshooting.  I tried using the search engine, but only found forums with beautiful bon bon discussion.  I have questions from the other side of the spectrum, like where things don't turn out right.  If there isn't a place for it, should I just post my questions here?

 

Thank you!

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Hello everyone!  I've been having a similar problem as @SweetandSnappyJen.  I made 10 molds of these bon bons.  Four of the molds came out (or well, didn't come out) like the first picture.  The other six molds came out great like the second picture.

 

1) Molds were polished with alcohol and then once again with dry cotton rounds.

2) Cocoa butter colors were tempered and sprayed at 30C and allowed time to set properly.

3) Room temp was 17-18C.  Humidity was 65% constantly. 

4) My dark chocolate was tempered properly and tested.  My shelling/working temp was 32-34C.  I suspect this is where I went wrong .  The molds that didn't come out were shelled first closer to 32C.  I felt my chocolate was getting a little think and cold so I heated it closer to 34C with a heat gun and then proceeded to shell the other 6 molds what came out fine.

5) The temperature of my ganache was around 30-31C when I filled them and left to crystalize overnight.

6) I capped them the next day and put them in the refrigerator for 15 mins and then took them out at come to room temp before unmolding them.

 

I'm guessing that the reason cocoa butter has been sticking to my molds is because my tempered chocolate is too cold when I am making the shells and that the cocoa butter isn't able to adhere to the chocolate.  Can someone confirm this?

 

My next question would be.......For dark, milk, and white chocolates each(I mainly use Valrhona if that helps)  what is the ideal working temperatures to be making the shells for molded bon bons?  I'm always worried about too cold and cocoa butter will stick to the mold.....too hot and I'll be out of temper.

 

Any help or advice is appreciated.  Thank you!

 thumbnail_IMG_7216.thumb.jpg.ccfef3524c18b6e064d02311e0b42e4a.jpgWailua.thumb.png.07fb0c9a9d4d36bd69b53623da7d2599.png

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As you noted - the warmer chocolate yielded better results. Having the shelling chocolate as warm as possible increases the success rate I've found.

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1 hour ago, Kerry Beal said:

As you noted - the warmer chocolate yielded better results. Having the shelling chocolate as warm as possible increases the success rate I've found.

Hi Kerry!  May I ask what you feel is the ideal temperature range and/or maximum temperature you work with for each dark, milk, and white chocolates?  (Without the use of eztemper.  Unfortunately, I'm don't have it available at my work for now)

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1 hour ago, MoonChild said:

Hi Kerry!  May I ask what you feel is the ideal temperature range and/or maximum temperature you work with for each dark, milk, and white chocolates?  (Without the use of eztemper.  Unfortunately, I'm don't have it available at my work for now)

Kind of pushing it but 34.5 for dark 32.5 for milk

 

 

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8 hours ago, Kerry Beal said:

Kind of pushing it but 34.5 for dark 32.5 for milk

 

 

Hmm......that's really helpful to know.  Especially the milk chocolate maximum.......I've definitely been shelling that and white chocolate way too cold then.  At 31C for milk and 29C for white.  I've kinda been following the temperature guides on the Valrhona bag so far, but it's nice to know I have a little flex and can go warmer.

 

4 hours ago, Avachocolate said:

@MoonChild....17-18 is a bit cold for the room....personally I never get good results at those temperatures....try having the room at 20-22 °C and the humidity below 50 %

Always works well for me but your mileage may vary...

That's kinda interesting.  I can raise the temp in my chocolate room, but trying to get the humidity low might be difficult here in Hawaii.  I'm curious though........I've always been under the assumption that a colder room is better for working with chocolate.  Could you please elaborate on how a cold room can negatively affect my results?  Thank you! 

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