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Pepper and Salt Mills/Grinders


Fat Guy
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As far as I understand, the Magnum's come with a coaster, but the Magnum Plus does not. At least that's what it says on their website.

Marlene

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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  • 4 weeks later...

I've had a Peugeot for a few years now, and while it works great on smaller black and on white peppercorns, it is a PITA when it comes to larger black peppercorns. I've been getting Penzey's extra bold lately, and now I'm really ready for something else. (And, yes, I have a mortar, pestle, spice mill, etc.)

Does anyone get consistently excellent results from their mill using those big Penzey's 'corns?

Chris Amirault

eG Ethics Signatory

Sir Luscious got gator belts and patty melts

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Magnum: this would seem to be my first choice since the capacity is smaller and it's not such a behemoth sitting on my counter.

Magnum Plus: this is the one you all are raving about.  is there a difference between this one and the Magnum?

A

I have owned one of each. The Magnum Plus really is a big mill ... which also makes it trickier to handle and more likely to be dropped and broken . at least it did in my house. Then got a Magnum, which is truly ideal. Both grind beautifully.

The only real downside is the plastic body. As noted above, I dropped and broke my Plus. My poor Magnum was sitting on the stove (ok .. stupid) with the oven on and the hot hair from the vent melted the top parts together so I can no longer load it -- it's out of pepper and out of usefulness. (I have a Bluestar range coming in next week ... I won't be putting my next magnum anywhere near it!)

Richard W. Mockler

Seattle

I will, in fact, eat anything once.

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Does anyone get consistently excellent results from their mill using those big Penzey's 'corns?

I do!

Since Penzeys opened a store in my area recently, I've been using their peppercorns in my Magnum and have been very happy with the results. Just finished a small jar of their Whole Special Extra Bold, and am currently running a load of their black/white euro-mix.

The Magnum refuses to hang up on any of 'em. Could probably grind small rocks...

So we finish the eighteenth and he's gonna stiff me. And I say, "Hey, Lama, hey, how about a little something, you know, for the effort, you know." And he says, "Oh, uh, there won't be any money. But when you die, on your deathbed, you will receive total consciousness."

So I got that goin' for me, which is nice.

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This is probably heresy, but I bought the disposable sea salt and peppercorn filled grinder at Costco and they work amazingly well (better than the $25 one that I just threw away (sorry, don't know the brand name - I bought it at Bed, Bath & Beyond). I will continue to use until I can save up for the Magnum.

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I recently purchased the Peugeot 9.5" Chateauneuf pepper mill (picture). The pepper mill is not grinding the way I expected it to, the pepper seems to only really be grinding some of the time, while the rest of the time is spent grinding with nothing in the chamber. I am using Penzey's Extra Bold peppercorns, and while Tellicherrys in particular are large, I don't think that should be a problem for a pepper mill of Peugeot's caliber. Is it just Penzey's Extra Bold, or have any other Peugeot owners had a problem with the large peppercorns?

On a related note, how fast do you guys grind the pepper? Perhaps I am assaulting the poor pepper mill before it can reload.

P.S. I am well aware that the Magnum happens to be king at the moment, however, I just cannot get past its looks, and that is why I choose the Peugeot.

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I just got a Magnum Plus (to replace a borrowed Magnum) and it chews through my Penzeys Tellicherrys just fine. I think the Magnum and the Plus do the same job grinding, but the Plus is a wee bit harder to get started and maintain a grip on (due to the larger size.) In true dork fashion, I like to hum the Imperial March while hosing down my salads with freshly ground pepper.

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It is really amazing, isn't it Chris. Ugly, ugly plastic, but it does a great job. I replaced a 12 inch grinder (don't recall the brand) with the Magnum and relegated one Peugot to white pepper and one to table duty. If the maker would go to the trouble to mount the grinding mechanism in good wood bodies, it would make a fine combination and I think people would pay $50 to $150 just like they do for grinders in good wood with other mechanisms.

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I just got my Magnum delivered today after reading this thread. A question, please...how do you change the grind? I thought I had seen something before about twisting the center but it seems to just open to fill with the peppercorns. It's probably so easy, but the booklett that came with it simply shows the different peppermills, nothing about using it. Thank you for any help.

:raz: Okay, I see it is on the bottom. I was sure as soon as I asked, it would become clear to me. The tightest twist seems not very fine, but I guess I'll have to just use it to see. Maybe it was a different mill that you change grind by twisting the center of the mill.

Edited by toni (log)
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  • 2 months later...
Someone earlier mentioned a request for a good one-handed pepper mill.  I would like to renew that request.  Also, please NO electrics.  What do you suggest?

The Pepperball.

One handed useage, no batteries.

I have one but wasn't impressed with the output considering the effort used. Though if you like Popeye-like forearms this sucker is for you. :raz::laugh:

 

“Peter: Oh my god, Brian, there's a message in my Alphabits. It says, 'Oooooo.'

Brian: Peter, those are Cheerios.”

– From Fox TV’s “Family Guy”

 

Tim Oliver

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I prefer the Unicorn Peppergun for one-handed operation - tried the Pepperball, didn't like it as well as the Peppergun - and I think the mechanism on these is sturdier

I have the large size Unicorn Magnum. The output rocks.

So how is the output of the Peppergun?

 

“Peter: Oh my god, Brian, there's a message in my Alphabits. It says, 'Oooooo.'

Brian: Peter, those are Cheerios.”

– From Fox TV’s “Family Guy”

 

Tim Oliver

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if, by output, you mean speed of coverage - it's not quite as good as my regular size Magnum - but then I'm usually using only one hand, and often that is my weaker left one - as you know, with the Magnums, it's a two-handed operation which automatically gives faster coverage because of that. I think if I were using both hands on the Peppergun, I'd approach the Magnum. Is the only difference between the large and the regular Magnum a difference in capacity?

but if you didn't mean speed of coverage, I'm not sure how to answer

I just know that I'm glad I found the Unicorn models, and all my friends who succumb are satisfied - I was gifted with the mini-grinder to take along with me on excursions

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Yes, that answered my question. I was just wondering about the amount of ground pepper that's outputted per squeezing action of the handles. IMHO, the Pepperball fails to deliver a decent quantity of ground pepper per squeeze of the handles.

I rarely find that I have need of a one-handed use of a peppermill which is why it was so easy to give up using the Pepperball and switch to the incredible Magnum.

 

“Peter: Oh my god, Brian, there's a message in my Alphabits. It says, 'Oooooo.'

Brian: Peter, those are Cheerios.”

– From Fox TV’s “Family Guy”

 

Tim Oliver

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I now have a set of magum mills, salt and pepper. While I like the Supreme mills, I find that the battery seems to always need charging just when I need a lot of salt and pepper. The magnum has amazing pepper output. Now if it just wasn't so damn ugly!

Marlene

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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My impression of the pepperball is that it is poorly constructed with a small output-per-squeeze. The main reason I want a one-handed mill is to cover raw meat with pepper before cooking, while flipping the food with the other hand. I get worried about cross-contamination from raw chicken when I use the two-handed peppermill and flip the breast over with my fingers. I also find it annoying to have to wash my hands like 500 times during prep. Hence the need for a good, well-made and well-functioning one-handed peppermill.

I have looked at the Unicorn Peppergun. Looks good. I'm also considering the Chef'n BistroGrind.

I guess I'm torn between those two models. The Peppergun comes from a more reputable company, but the design looks awkward, while the BistroGrind seems like a better design, although it comes from the same company that makes the pepperball.

-James Kessler

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I may be missing some critical element here, but why not use a pair of tongs to turn the chicken (or whatever) and the magnum which will pour out a great quantity of pepper rapidly.

When I season raw meat, whether it's beef (usually a steak) or chicken, I like to rub the seasonings into the meat with my hand, turn the meat over and do the same with the back side. So one hand will be "contaminated" during the process. Perhaps this is what James is doing.

Another solution would be to do what many cooking shows do...pre-grind your seasonings right before you begin to prep/touch the meat. That way they'll be freshly ground and they'll be ready when you need them. Then there's no need for a one-handed peppermill.

 

“Peter: Oh my god, Brian, there's a message in my Alphabits. It says, 'Oooooo.'

Brian: Peter, those are Cheerios.”

– From Fox TV’s “Family Guy”

 

Tim Oliver

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****

Another solution would be to do what many cooking shows do...pre-grind your seasonings right before you begin to prep/touch the meat. That way they'll be freshly ground and they'll be ready when you need them. Then there's no need for a one-handed peppermill.

Right. This works well and saves some hand washings.

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We bought the black PepperMills Supreme 2000 back in December.... I'd had a battery powered pepper mill in the past, it took 6 AA batteries, and they needed pretty frequent replacing. The store had one of these PepperMills out on display and the first thing I noticed was the speed. It grinds a lot of pepper pretty fast, and it is powerful. We gave it a full charge (comes with an AC adaptor) overnight when we got home, and it is still going STRONG on that first charge, with near daily use.

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My PepperMills Supreme 2000 finally lost its charge last week. That's 7 months on 1 charge! It didn't slowly lose its charge the way some rechargeable appliances do. It pretty much went from full speed ahead to wimpy to dead in about one or two uses. I gave it another full charge so I'm probably good to go till 2007. For those who need one handed operation and/or want an electric pepper mill, I highly recommend this one. Link to their website above in quoted post.

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As an 'ordinary' (two handed) pepper mill, my Ikea one seems to do the job very well.

It grinds pepper consistently. I set the adjustment to my liking years ago and haven't touched it since. The adjustment simply doesn't wander. Its easy enough to fill, (without messing up the setting) and holds a fair handful of peppercorns.

It doesn't look at all special. (Unless you like bowling pins.)

Its been dropped at least a couple of times and survived totally unscathed.

It was pretty cheap and has been working well for me for years - six maybe.

I'm not sure I see any advantage in changing. Which makes me wonder why (apart from aesthetics or scale) people would choose anything different.

A couple of others upthread seem similarly impressed.

Are we missing something important?

It uses a ceramic mechanism visibly labelled "Crushgrind".

Has anyone compared this mechanism (in whatever styled mounting) to the Magnum so lauded in this thread? And I mean for enthusiastic home use, not 'production'.

"If you wish to make an apple pie from scratch ... you must first invent the universe." - Carl Sagan

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