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njduchess

All About Gin, Generally

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We managed to do a tasting with Plymouth, Bombay Sapphire, Hendrick's and Junipero between what we had and what friends had. We tried them straight from the freezer. What I thought was my favorite (the Sapphire) came in dead last for pretty much everyone, including me. It really had a subdued flavor compared to the others and I'm surprised it's listed as a recommend for people who like a stronger flavored gin. I'm now drinking my words (instead of eating them) and hoarding the bottles I lugged from BevMo, where a bottle of Plymouth cost a cool $15 compared to the $33 here. We thought Plymouth and Junipero were the best for making cocktails, where Hendrick's was too perfumy for some of us, and the rest thought it would be good just drunk straight.

regards,

trillium

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Interesting. I'm a little surprised at Sapphire being described as a "more assertive spirit for cocktails" -- especially alongside Junìpero, which really is quite assertive. I have it on good authority that Sapphire was created specifically to be the "vodka drinker's gin" with a less assertive flavor profile than most gins around at the time.

Trillium, the comparative gin tasting sounds very interesting. I'd be especially interested to do a tasting first at room temperature and then later at a cold temperature to see what the difference would be.

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If you love gin and ever visit Vancouver you should check out the WaaZuBee Cafe on Commercial Drive. They have a gin list with over a dozen gins with detailed tasting notes. It is my understanding that it is the best gin list in Canada. The most interesting gin I tried was the Hendrick's from Scotland which is infused with rose petals and cucumber along with the usual botonticals.

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Interesting. I'm a little surprised at Sapphire being described as a "more assertive spirit for cocktails" -- especially alongside Junìpero, which really is quite assertive. I have it on good authority that Sapphire was created specifically to be the "vodka drinker's gin" with a less assertive flavor profile than most gins around at the time.

There were a couple of other strange comments in the article, leading me to wonder if Mr. Boyd had actually tried all the gins or was just reporting what others had told him (he's primarily a wine writer, incidentally). Lumping in Daresbury's Q (Quintessential) with Beefeater and Tanqueray as "fuller" was an oddity, too -- unless he's going by proof -- Q is 90 proof. But as for flavor, I'd put Q in with Tanq 10 or Bombay Sapphire; in fact, the blurb on Q at BevMo read something along the lines of "forget your father's gin that tasted of bitter juniper. . . this is the new generation. . ." Not that it's bad, but it doesn't fit the same profile as Beefeater and Tanqueray.

And to suggest that Tanquerey 10's being available would appease the lovers of Malacca was totally bizarre -- granted, it's been a while since I've tasted Malacca, but I don't remember it being anything like Tanq 10.

Still, god knows, it's nice to see a gin article, whatever its shortcomings.

By the way, does anyone have any opinions on Damrak? From other things I've read, it seems likely to be closer in flavor to Malacca than anything else on the market. But I haven't found it in mini-bottles, and hesitate to buy a 750-ml without a recommendation.

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I was pleased to see Citadelle mention - without the usual disclaimers about the "oddity" of a French gin. It's been my standard mid-priced option for a while ... though, unless I'm mistaken, the price has climbed and it's not that much of a savings over Plymouth.

Other gins that I'd like to hear people's opinions on:

Van Gogh

Broker's

I'm particularly interested in Broker's since it's almost in the bargain category ($14 a 750 when last I checked) yet it's been getting good press. From what I've heard it seems to be fairly botanical as opposed to being a "vodka drinker's gin" as I think the article put it.

Best,

Rien

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I was pleased to see Citadelle mention - without the usual disclaimers about the "oddity" of a French gin. It's been my standard mid-priced option for a while ... though, unless I'm mistaken, the price has climbed and it's not that much of a savings over Plymouth.

Other gins that I'd like to hear people's opinions on:

Van Gogh

Broker's

I'm particularly interested in Broker's since it's almost in the bargain category ($14 a 750 when last I checked) yet it's been getting good press. From what I've heard it seems to be fairly botanical as opposed to being a "vodka drinker's gin" as I think the article put it.

Best,

Rien

Hamilton, Montana one week ago I got Citadelle for $21.99 at the state store. Got a little left in my Martini kit ; Think I may have one. :laugh:

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so far i have used Beefeaters and Gordons and have had some nice results with these. I did not like the tanquray.

What do you use and do what gins do you reccomend?

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I always use Bombay Sapphire for gin and tonics. Some of the gin snobs will say that Bombay Sapphire is not for true Gin lovers, but I think it tastes plenty ginny, and the botanicals add a lot.

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rabidscottsman:

Although a search of "gin" is not permitted (crummy three letter rule) there are at least a dozen threads on the subject -- who prefers, side by side taste testings, etc.

One thing that eG'ers love is the flavoured vodka known as gin (moi being an exception -- I loath juniper). Scroll through the Fine Spirits forum and you'll see multiple gin threads. :smile:

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I've been using David Rosengarten's recipe for "The Frosty Plymouth Gin & Tonic" -- it's the best ever, imho. It's reproduced (among other places, I imagine) here.

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i have no objections to tanqueray. basically as long as i don't wake up the next morning with a taste/texture in my mouth that suggests i've been engaging in unlawful sexual congress with a wild ass i am fine. note: i don't object to tastes and textures that suggest lawful sexual congress with a wild ass; i just don't want to break the law.

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Gin and tonic is one of the few drinks I drink when I'm not drinking rum. a few months ago I drank some Danmark and liked it a lot.

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I always come back to Beefeater, but I haven't tried some in this thread. Plymouth has me intrigued.


Edited by mike k (log)

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I tried David Rosengarten's Frosty Plymouth Gin & Tonic last night, and oooh my, it was tasty. Nice and strong and clean, with plenty of lime, and the idea of making tonic water ice cubes is a great innovation. On a hot Seattle evening, it almost went down too easily, but oh, was it refreshing. Being a bit of a lightweight, though, I'll have to temper it next time--I think my head was floating about four feet above my shoulders when I attempted to start making dinner about a half hour later. :blink::unsure::biggrin:

[Disclaimer: I suppose I should admit that I'm a newcomer to the gin and tonic scene, having only been initiated into the circle a month or so ago. But nonetheless I can say with confidence that David Rosengarten has got himself a nice little formula here.]

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For a pleasant and inexpensive surprise try Rear Admiral Joseph's from Trader Joes.

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I have to confess that using something relatively delicate like Plymouth in a G&T seems like a waste of premium booze to me. If I were going to use an expensive gin, I'd want something like Junipero, which has an assertive flavor that's heavy on the juniper.

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I've been using David Rosengarten's recipe for "The Frosty Plymouth Gin & Tonic" -- it's the best ever, imho. It's reproduced (among other places, I imagine) here.

I haven't quite gone to these lengths mentioned, but I am a plymouth fan through and through. It's the only gin we ever have around and sadly I don't see it out that often. It's also good for cooking with occasionally as it has a very clean and spicy juniper flavour.

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I have to confess that using something relatively delicate like Plymouth in a G&T seems like a waste of premium booze to me.

I concur. I use Plymouth in martinis, but not in G&Ts, where I prefer to take out my rather large bottle of standard-issue Tanq.

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I'm a believer in Plymouth (nice and dry), with Tanqueray a close second. Recently I took my parents a bottle of Hendrick's, because it's distilled in Ayrshire (near where they live). You're supposed to garnish a Hendrick's + tonic with a slice of cucumber rather than lemon. We had a tasting (see, this is why I love my parents - they take their gin V-E-R-Y S-E-R-I-O-U-S-L-Y), and I found it rather like drinking bubblebath, which I suppose would be the rose petals in it.

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I'm glad to see that Mrs. T still has some beaux. When I was in Tokyo in 1985, I preferred it to Beefeater. Locating tonic water required sweeps of all liquor shops in about a 1 hour walking distance radius, and imported lemons were sold with large signs warning of dire risks to health from the wild overuse of chemicals on imported citrus (strangely silent on the question of domestic produce). Those were the days when friends of neighbor's cousins would ring up and say "I got your phone number off a friend, I don't know where I am, but it's somewhere in Tokyo, come and get me please!" In my tiny one-room flat, a bottle of Tanqueray seemed to be the only thing that would always find a place, no matter how many Kiwis and their suitcases turned up.

I don't think I've ever drunk G&T in NZ, where it would be so much easier to make - it seems like a hot climate drink to me.

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It depends on my mood.

If I'm looking for a good belt of juniper, Tanqueray it is.

Something more delicate, Bombay Sapphire.

As I've mentioned before, it frosts me no end to go to a friend's house, be offered a gin and tonic then have a drink handed to me with a smile and a "Sorry, we don't have any limes." :angry:

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I'm a believer in Plymouth (nice and dry), with Tanqueray a close second. Recently I took my parents a bottle of Hendrick's, because it's distilled in Ayrshire (near where they live). You're supposed to garnish a Hendrick's + tonic with a slice of cucumber rather than lemon. We had a tasting (see, this is why I love my parents - they take their gin V-E-R-Y S-E-R-I-O-U-S-L-Y), and I found it rather like drinking bubblebath, which I suppose would be the rose petals in it.

Hendricks and tonic is a very nice treat on a hot summer afternoon. I also have Bombay Sapphire and tonic occassionally but more often I drink the Bombay in a gimlet form.

A slightly different question is what brand of tonic water do you use? I find the big brands (Schweppes, Canada Dry) a bit on the sweet side. Are there boutique brands out there I should be trying? Can I make my own?

So many questions to answer before the hot weather is in retreat.

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For a pleasant and inexpensive surprise try Rear Admiral Joseph's from Trader Joes.

Coincidentally, I made gin and tonics just the other day at a friend's house using this gin for the first time. I was, indeed, pleasantly surprised!

Cheers,

Squeat

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